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Old 05-16-2013, 10:31 AM
johnboy87 johnboy87 is offline
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What do you folks use as calorie filler?
I got some great ideas from this thread and I was making a mixed thirty day
Bucket with breakfast lunch and dinner, but I noticed allot of the instant stuff is pretty low in calories.
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Old 05-16-2013, 11:08 AM
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My stockpile contains quite a lot of pasta and a variety of dried beans, and I plan to purchase much more of both. These are pretty high in calories.

With these ingredients plus some herbs and a little mayonnaise or oil, I can make many permutations of pasta salad. (Yes, I know long-term storage of oil and mayonnaise is problematic, but I have a modest amount that should be good for a couple years. Plus, I'm going to plant a big patch of sunflower black oil seeds this year; the plan is to buy an oil press and make my own sunflower oil. Also, at the first sign of TSHTF, I'll be stocking up big-time on mayonnaise from the supermarket!)

I can also make good use of the pasta to create casseroles with some of the canned meats, poultry, and fish in my stockpile, as long as I have powdered milk (which I do), and butter (I have Red Feather canned butter), and flour (which I will) plus some seasonings and some canned veggies.

In addition, I can use the pasta to make mac & cheese. My stockpile contains canned Bega cheese plus all other ingredients required for mac & cheese.

I have about 15 pounds of herbs - mostly dill and anise seed, which I love. Hope to have an herb garden soon, too. And, I have a good supply of salt, salt substitute (low in sodium), and black pepper (I got the whole peppercorns that come in a jar with an integral grinder - my thought is that whole peppercorns will keep longer than ground black pepper).
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Old 05-16-2013, 08:03 PM
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If you're talking actual long term, here's mine:

1. Smoked moose
2. Smoked trout
3. Turnips stored in "icebox" (a hole cut in the ground next to the house)
4. Carrots stored in icebox
5. Beets (Mason jars or icebox)
6. Various roots/tubers/rootstalks/berries/etc. that I find in my local area (again, the icebox, and the Mason jars for the berries)

Small game and chickens get eaten shortly after they are killed (a few days at most).

Because of the climate here, we can't grow much. I taught myself some of the old methods because I just never wanted to go with canning. Mason jars are about as far as I'm willing to go in that department. I have enough mixed canned food in the basement to get started up with the above list.

Simple simple
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Old 05-16-2013, 09:26 PM
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Jim, about your "icebox" (hole in the ground) - I've been thinking of doing something like that. A trashcan root cellar or some semblance of that. I too am in a location with very cold winters. I've been concerned about the possibility that the foods near the top of the hole could freeze in winter. Do you put a lot of insulation over the top of the hole? If not, how do you deal with the cold so the veggies don't freeze?

Also - what, if anything do you use for a container (trashcan, plastic tote, bucket...)?
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Old 05-16-2013, 10:01 PM
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Jim, about your "icebox" (hole in the ground) - I've been thinking of doing something like that. A trashcan root cellar or some semblance of that. I too am in a location with very cold winters. I've been concerned about the possibility that the foods near the top of the hole could freeze in winter. Do you put a lot of insulation over the top of the hole? If not, how do you deal with the cold so the veggies don't freeze?

Also - what, if anything do you use for a container (trashcan, plastic tote, bucket...)?
Dig the hole deep and then do not put anything above the line where the soil freezes. My safety line is 2 feet and it's more than enough. Anything below the safety line will be safe.

There's no container. It's rocks down that deep. I had to cut it with a jackhammer. There's almost no topsoil here. I put a wood pallet on the top. It locks in nicely. Then I cover it with scrap wood. It's next to the log pile. I don't know what to tell you about using a container because I don't need one, but maybe you do because of your soil and your Winter conditions. I also must mention that there is a large overhang over my icebox and my house is on a convienient slope. Rain cannot get in.

It works fine and I've experienced no food loss to animals, mold, fungus, cold, etc.

My Grandfather taught me how to make an icebox because he grew up with one. His family was too poor to own a fridge.

I must tell you right now though that your veggies will get funky down there. Not bad funky, but dry and leathery.
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Old 05-16-2013, 10:34 PM
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This is all good information Jim - especially because the climate where you live is very similar to the climate where I live. Thanks for sharing.

Good to know 2 feet is deep enough. I was envisioning going down something like 4 feet because, around here, when somebody is pouring concrete footings for a building's foundation, they go down 4 feet.

Do you ever get water in the icebox (especially in the spring)?

Have you every had concern about falling into the hole when attempting to add something to the icebox or retrieve something from it?
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Old 05-16-2013, 11:00 PM
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Default Long-Term Storage of Special Survival Foods

After you have established your short-term stash, which should get your family through emergencies lasting from a week to several weeks, you may decide that you would like to store larger quantities of food in preparation for longer emergencies. In this section I will discuss a long-term food storage technique.

The following foods if stored properly have an indefinite shelf-life:
Whole Wheat Berries
White Sugar
Salt
Pure Sorghum Molasses
Pure Honey


Certain other foods, if stored properly, can keep for 5 to 10 years or even longer. All stored foods should be dated so they can be rotated out when the time comes to replace them.
Other cereals, such as oats
Dried Beans
Dried Corn
Rice
Couscous
Whole Spices

Before I discuss the best way to store these foods, lets take a brief moment to review the major reasons why stored foods spoil. Food is spoiled primarily by the growth of microorganisms. In order to grow and reproduce, most microorganism require two things, water and oxygen. When foods are canned they are preserved by killing all the microorganism in the food and the storage container by sterilization, and by keeping the container completely impervious to the entry of additional microorganisms. When foods are preserved by dehydration nearly all of the water is removed. The microorganisms that are in the food are not killed but without water they can not grow and reproduce. When foods are frozen the live microorganisms remain in the food, but the extremely low temperature stops their metabolism so they do not grow and reproduce. (Your refrigerator does not stop the growth of microorganisms, but their metabolism is slowed enough to prevent the food from spoiling before it can be consumed.) Pure honey and molasses are special because they naturally contain ingredients that prevent the growth of microorganisms.
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Old 05-17-2013, 01:30 PM
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Originally Posted by MyPrepperLife View Post
This is all good information Jim - especially because the climate where you live is very similar to the climate where I live. Thanks for sharing.

Good to know 2 feet is deep enough. I was envisioning going down something like 4 feet because, around here, when somebody is pouring concrete footings for a building's foundation, they go down 4 feet.

Do you ever get water in the icebox (especially in the spring)?

Have you every had concern about falling into the hole when attempting to add something to the icebox or retrieve something from it?
2 feet is the safety line. The hole is actually 6 or 7 feet deep. You do not put anything above the safety line. Just making sure I was being clear.

I've never gotten water in there, but I put a lot of thought into constructing it. It has to be placed perfectly. Use the slope of your property and the position of your home to place the hole (hole goes on the side of your house that is on the downslope) and make sure there is something over it to stop the rain, something big.

I'm fit enough to not fall in the hole, but I'm also the only person that accesses it. I keep the pallet and the scrap wood on top of it to prevent accidents.

This technique works well. It's old as the hills, but it can be screwed up very easily.
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Old 05-22-2013, 07:32 PM
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Keep the ideas comin folks.
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Old 05-23-2013, 04:50 AM
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http://www.healthaliciousness.com/ar...st-protein.php this is a site to find the nutrition of all kinds of beans. I never thought about what was on in them till recently. And here you can find the shelf life for anything. http://www.stilltasty.com/
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Old 05-23-2013, 05:03 AM
Mels thinkingitover Mels thinkingitover is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Glenda Sue View Post
http://www.healthaliciousness.com/ar...st-protein.php this is a site to find the nutrition of all kinds of beans. I never thought about what was on in them till recently. And here you can find the shelf life for anything. http://www.stilltasty.com/
www.stilltasty.com has some wrong information regarding shelf life of canned foods. It does not address foods packed for long term storage at all. Using those date ranges in a long term storage application will lead you astray. www.stilltasty.com tends to be a regurgitation of the "best buy" date system, not an estimate of actual storage shelf life.
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Old 08-24-2014, 02:13 AM
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bump to move to new Food & Water forum...
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