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Old 09-17-2011, 07:08 PM
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Old 09-17-2011, 07:20 PM
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Staples:

Rice of various types - with some "wild" rice which has better nutrition value than conventional rice, but is much more expensive (about 5 to ten times). Wild rice has quite a different flavor and takes longer to cook. I would mix it about one in ten with regular rice - gives it a nice flavor. By itself the flavor is too strong IMO. I would get various kinds of rice - white rice, brown rice, parboiled rice (cooks faster, a bit more expensive but can be more nutritious than white rice if you get the right kind).

Dry beans (various, but mostly red beans or maybe look closer at the nutrition value of each type), red, lentils, dried split peas and so on. Lentils are very nutritious and you can mix them with other foods and make lots of good meals with them. For the cost ($1 per pound various places), they are a pretty good value IMO.

Quinoa and some other "super" grains - preferably ones that don't need any
further processing. I want foods that I can prepare without processing.

Some canned meats.
Some dried meats.
Some canned fruit.
Some dried fruit.
Canned veggies.
Various vitamins depending on the needs of the family.
Hot Cereals: Grits, MaltoMeal, Cream of Rice, granola (boxes of granola cereal often have nuts and fruit in them and on sale they can be fairly affordable). Oatmeal.

Spices - I usually get most of mine at Costco. Pepper and salt of course - a lot of salt as it is cheap and can be used for a lot of things. Brown and white sugar. Cinnamon (the spice must flow!). Various other spices like curries and so on. Even if you don't use them, you can repackage them in smaller amounts and trade them. If you acquire or are a good cook wonders can be done with regular food and a variety of spices. I've heard from some Indians I work with that a little bit of saffron does wonders with rice - for aroma more than taste. It is expensive, but probably worth it.

I could go on and on - just walking through the store I can often find a lot of stuff I would buy if I had the room to store it properly (I do now). There actually is quite a bit of good stuff you can get in a regular grocery store.

Note: I generally do not buy food in loose bulk from bins. I have seen that the same amount in packages is usually about the same cost, it is easier to transport and most of that packaging actually does a better job keeping the food fresh and sealed.

Also, I generally buy stuff when on sale, and then I buy a lot of it. I don't have a budget, so sometimes I leave a store with $300 worth of groceries (I am single) and come home to find no place to put it all (I need to get a standalone freezer).
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Old 09-17-2011, 07:38 PM
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I see a lot about water storage. I suppose it depends where you live. I keep two 55 gal drums of water to flush with and a few cases of drinking water on hand. Rivers, bayous, ponds and lakes are on just about every corner. To me its more important to keep pool shock than store water.
$500 a month will nail down most all of the staples in the first year. The second year start working on Rx meds. Some MDs will write a scrip for extra blood pressure and heart meds but its hard to find one that will give you antibiotics. You will have to be creative on this , fish antibiotics, Canada or Mexico.
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Old 09-17-2011, 07:59 PM
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I see a lot about water storage. I suppose it depends where you live. I keep two 55 gal drums of water to flush with and a few cases of drinking water on hand. Rivers, bayous, ponds and lakes are on just about every corner. To me its more important to keep pool shock than store water.
Location plays a big part alright. But we tend to soon forget our lessons. Take a look back even at the blizzard earlier in the year. We even got frozen up down here in west Texas for a few days. There were a lot of places where you'd be hard pressed to even get to those outside sources of water for weeks or more. And during times like that they would be frozen over anyway. There could be other reasons too such as hostilities in the area, toxins or what have you. If you're going to get shot at trying to get water from the river, staying in and using out of storage makes a lot more sense until things calm down.

While having external sources to refill water storage is critical. That water storage itself is just about mandatory unless you have a seriously secure source such as a well in your basement. Water is just too critical to speculate about.

Adequate storage can take some thinking outside the box and some detective work to source tankage and such. But it doesn't have to be expensive. I put in 1,600 gallons worth for about $100 by keeping my eyes open and thinking outside the box.
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Old 09-17-2011, 09:19 PM
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i would buy $500 worth of trix bars. this has nothing to do with preppping or survival, i just really really like twix bars. if the end is gonna come, there is little i can do about it, but at least i can go out eating twix bars.
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Old 09-17-2011, 09:24 PM
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If not already shown, here it is. . . $440, nuf said.

http://beprepared.com/product.asp_Q_...%20&%20Legumes
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Old 09-17-2011, 09:38 PM
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Since prices are going up, your $500 in succeeding months could produce diminishing returns. I started with coupons and got twice as much (or better) for the same money. Since nobody knows how much time there is to prepare, a variety of things will serve you well. As for water, I use coupons to get soda and tea for free or cheap and then I refill the bottle with filtered tap water and put it in the freezer. The freezer is used for water and food with a shorter shelf life (like brown rice) so when the electricity goes, no worries about having to cook stuff right away.

I'd get the most bang for the buck by shopping loss leaders at every grocery store by taking the ads to Walmart and price matching. One stop shopping at the lowest price!
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Old 09-17-2011, 11:51 PM
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Lard will store almost indefinatly,
Jiff peanut butter is good for two years
Tang is good for two years
Dry beans and rice will store almost indefinatly if kept dry, tough task in michigan.
Canned meat is risky, if you get a bad batch in a survival situation, it could mean death.
Alan
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Old 09-18-2011, 02:38 AM
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Originally Posted by Texas_Red View Post
We were able to get long grain rice for 19 cents a pound with coupon
For sure! I worked those Mathama rice coupons right up until the day Kroger stopped doubling coupons.

If you have an Albertson's in your area, they publish mfg-coupon booklets every month and they're near the front door. I got 75 trial size Axe deodorant for free by using them at Walmart and Target.

By using coupons and price matching at Walmart you can easily turn $500 into $1000 or more. Don't bother with the TLC show.
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Old 09-18-2011, 03:01 AM
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Originally Posted by HikerDad View Post
Hello all,

Just to get an idea on what I should/could spend money on I'd like to pose a question to the forum.

You have $500 extra a month to spend on food but you can only shop at local stores [no online bulk can orders].
You can buy food from any grocery store [Meijer, Walmart, Whole Foods, Sam's Club, etc] but it has to be food [even freeze dried camp food is fine].

What would you buy and how would you store it for long term storage?
Also you have a small freezer and a dehydrator.

Thanks for your thoughts,

-HikerDad
Can we assume that local stores also includes local farmers markets? If so, then: 1) Get canning supplies and learn to use them 2) Buy in bushells when food is in season (healthier, cheaper, and better tasting).

Not everything can be frozen long, some has to be canned etc. Fresh fruit does okay for one year in the freezer (if vacuum sealed), but around here a bushell of peaches or two flats of strawberries will be gone before then.

Important: create a balanced menu for your entire household based on what you will actually be happy and healthy eating for one week. We all see folks that have 200lbs of rice on hand, but no vitC or whole milk for children.
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Old 09-18-2011, 08:12 AM
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I would hate to be without my online sources. The years supply albertjohnson linked to, Honeyvillegrains powdered eggs and bulk purchases of commercialy dehydrated vegetables are the heart of my long term stores.

However, if you don't want people seeing massive deliveries or whatever, I'd do this:

Buy big on the sale items. Grocery stores generally have a 10 week cycle with things going on sale every 10 weeks. Take advantage of this.

Dairy - powdered milk repacked into freezer storage bags and those put into a heavy duty tote. You need them to last until you are able to pack them long term. There are books on how to make dairy products from powdered milk. Buy one of those books.

Protein - figure 6oz a day per person as an amount to calculate with. each week try to get a months worth in. Watch for sales! A sale on tuna or canned hams should make you dance for joy.

Veggies. carrots, green beans are the cheapest , easiest base. Tomatoes also, they have vitamin C in them. You'll use the liquid in the cans too - don't pour those vitamins out! Use them to cook rice with. Again, figure out how much you need. One can a person a day? Way better to overestimate how much you need.

Fruit. My fruit stores are store brand fruit canned in fruit juice. Sweet, nourishing and easy to eat. Vitamin C is tremendously important.

Starches. Rice and white flour pasta can be stored for years if kept dry. Fill a good sized plastic tote with each. Buckets are better of course, but can be hard to find. Oatmeal, stored as I suggested the powdered milk be stored.

Oils. A gallon frozen in the freezer and a gallon in the fridge used for daily cooking. Tuna packed in oil. Peanut Butter. Spam. Commercially jarred spaghetti sauces. You can get the oil you need for nutrition by having fattier foods stored.

Sugar can be stored for years too. Fill another tote with that. Salt. Same deal.

Yes - I know plastics can leach into foods. Still, they can be useful. Have as a goal getting food grade buckets, but better food in a tote then no food. I have also read of people buying aluminum trashcans, washing them and then using them as rodent proof storage containers.
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Old 09-18-2011, 02:11 PM
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[Quote;Fruit. My fruit stores are store brand fruit canned in fruit juice. Sweet, nourishing and easy to eat. Vitamin C is tremendously important.

I tried some canned fruit, two years old, when I opened up the can the fruit, peaches, had turned to mush, it tasted ok but the consistancy was bad.

How long is your fruit good for storage?
Alan
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Old 09-18-2011, 06:52 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by HikerDad View Post
Great info so far guys.

I too never really thought about water storage as I live in Michigan and it's really hard not to find water.. but then I would have to filter.. etc. I think I'll store a barrel outside next to house just in case.

I do have a small garden and I've done ok this year [17qts of tomatoes, 14qt pickled cabbage, 13lb of cabbage becoming kraut right now and I still have to pick beets, carrots, more tomatoes and a bunch of hot peppers].

We have no food allergies and can eat just about anything.

I like the idea of rotation so I can eat what I buy, however I'd also like to have the long term storage but I don't like to rely on power [freezer, fridge] to keep it fresh.

Canned meats is a great suggestion and I'll be sure to stock up on them.

What about things like vinegar, salt etc?
As I'm canning this year I realize I would be a loss for these type of things if SHTF and w/o them I can't can many things.

What type of liquid vegetable oil lasts the longest in storage? I know olive is pretty short term.

Thanks again for your thoughts.

-HikerDad

just wait thats just the 1st year its going to take 3-5 years to be totally ready.



year 2

1st month: buy a hand gun (caliber of choice)
2nd month: buy ammo and 4 mags
3rd month: save up 3 months worth or buy a little every month
4th month: still saveing
5th month: buy solar equipement to run your water pump/frige/freezer. next year you can add to it to power the entire house, just get the main equipement that will allow you to expand
6th month: stock up canned goods and dry goods used (rotate)
7th month:buy 200 rounds of ammo for shotgun and pistol,weapons cleanning kits any misc stuff you want to add to any of your weapons
8th month: buy misc good quality non food items, flashlights, rechargable batteries,battery charger,lanterns,how to books...ect
9th month:buy misc good quality non food items,medicains,1st aid supplies...ect
10th month: restock misc hous hold items soape,shampoo,TP... ect
11th month: restock freezer with another 1/2 cow
12th month restock freezer with chichen and pork
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Old 09-18-2011, 06:57 PM
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Originally Posted by ol_hoot View Post
I was looking at the Mountain House Foods dehydrated meals at wally-world recently. They had a variety of meals and most were a little under $5.00 per bag.
I watched the vid where Kev had some Chili-Mac out at the river and he said it was pretty good.

I was considering that if I bought 1 or 2 of these a week when we go out there, pretty soon I would have a nice stack of them and have something edible put back.

What do y'all think about this brand for prep food ?
... and is this a good plan ?
Mountain House is great. I try to buy a meal or two evertime I go to Walmart. They add up pretty quick. They taste great. All mine have a best if used by 12/2018 so they aren`t going bad anytime soon. I take them camping also.
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Old 09-18-2011, 07:49 PM
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I won a chest freezer full of meat in a raffle when I was eleven years old ... Been a fan of buying direct from the slaughterhouse ever since.

I've noticed several comments along the lines of 'plenty of pool shock, no need to store extra water, have plenty, ect.', and to that I say "good for you!" - but - there are certain circumstances when it may not be safe to go out to get that abundent water, so having at least a one month supply in storage is always a good plan. Mine inhabits the lowest level of my stainless steel wire shelves ($50 each, walmart) so if one springs a leak, it wont spoil my other goodies. The shelves are a great way to have easy access to your supplies, and keep the critters (and occasional light flooding) from getting to your dry goods.

Tomatoes, pineapple, asperagus, and seasoned greens are good sources of vitamins. Pineapple makes a good desert item, and doesn't go mushy like peaches do (and are excellent with baked spam). Salmon in a can along with canned okra and a box of Tony Chachre's gumbo mix makes a great crowd pleaser, and the pantry moths have yet to attempt an assault on the gumbo mix.

Tuna, tuna helper, and some canned milk and peas are a good combination, with instant pudding for desert (gotta do something with the leftover milk before it spoils). The missus likes powdered milk, but I've gotta have that milk fat, or it just doesn't work for me. The oldest canned milk I've got on hand atm passed it's best by date four years ago, and yep, it's still good.

Spaghetti. Dry pasta is cheap, a good source of carbs, and lasts forever. Mix it up with a can of tomato sauce, a can of corned beef, and a cap full of garlic powder, and you'll get few complaints. I buy it in the 5 lb bags, and stack it on the shelves, cackling like a fiend.

Toilet paper and maxi pads. Store them in your attic, and save some money on heating costs. The pads will make you a hero with the ladies, and are also good for dressing wounds. Toilet paper makes you a hero with ... just about everyone.

There are tons of other prep items, and so little space, so I'll close with this: look for bargains, look for utility (can/will you use this stuff in everyday life, even if S doesnt HTF?), and look for nutritional value. Peas are cheap, but they don't bring much to the party, unless you just happen to like peas. You get the idea.
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Old 09-18-2011, 07:51 PM
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year 3 many of the items in the misc non house hold items can be found in yard sales and auctions,as well as camping and fishing items and you will get them very cheap

1st month: save
2nd month: buy your main battle rifle of your choice
3rd month:buy 6-10 mags and ammo
4th month: save
5th month: buy solar equipement to expand and power your AC/heating,stove and oven,microwave
6month: more misc non food items how to books,tools...ect
7th month: buy restock house hold items,medcains,1st aid supplies
8th month: restock canned goods and dry goods
9th month: restock anything that is low any left over buy silver bullion
10th month: buy ammo for all weapons
11th month: buy a 1/2 cow to restock freezer
12th month: buy chicken and pork and refill freezer

year 4

1st month: buy a .22 LR 4-6 mags,and ammo
2nd month:buy small conceal carry pistol and 3 mags (380 or 9mm) buy ammo
3rd month: buy ammo for all weapons (even the new ones) and go to the range
4th month:save money
5th month: finish buying all you need for solar equipement
6th month: buy some silver IF its less thn $55 per oz, if its to high buy bartering items like loose tobbaco,whiskey,...ect
7th month; buy canned goods and dry goods
8th month; restock house hold items,if any left over add more cann/dry goods
9th month: restock any items that are low, any cash left stash back
10th month: restock freezer
11th month: restock freezer
12th month: buy silver or bartering items

year 5 now that your on solar power and your saveing money from not spending it on electricity. spend the new found money on hardening your house up with hurrican window screens, better doors & locks.... ect

just keep everything restocked
buy more ammo until you got at least 2k-3k for each weapon
buy more silver and /or bartering items until you run out of storage area
buy hand tools, misc repair items for your home,car,and personel items (like eye glasses)
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Old 09-18-2011, 09:04 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Seraph035 View Post
I won a chest freezer full of meat in a raffle when I was eleven years old ... Been a fan of buying direct from the slaughterhouse ever since.

I've noticed several comments along the lines of 'plenty of pool shock, no need to store extra water, have plenty, ect.', and to that I say "good for you!" - but - there are certain circumstances when it may not be safe to go out to get that abundent water, so having at least a one month supply in storage is always a good plan. Mine inhabits the lowest level of my stainless steel wire shelves ($50 each, walmart) so if one springs a leak, it wont spoil my other goodies. The shelves are a great way to have easy access to your supplies, and keep the critters (and occasional light flooding) from getting to your dry goods.

Tomatoes, pineapple, asperagus, and seasoned greens are good sources of vitamins. Pineapple makes a good desert item, and doesn't go mushy like peaches do (and are excellent with baked spam). Salmon in a can along with canned okra and a box of Tony Chachre's gumbo mix makes a great crowd pleaser, and the pantry moths have yet to attempt an assault on the gumbo mix.

Tuna, tuna helper, and some canned milk and peas are a good combination, with instant pudding for desert (gotta do something with the leftover milk before it spoils). The missus likes powdered milk, but I've gotta have that milk fat, or it just doesn't work for me. The oldest canned milk I've got on hand atm passed it's best by date four years ago, and yep, it's still good.

Spaghetti. Dry pasta is cheap, a good source of carbs, and lasts forever. Mix it up with a can of tomato sauce, a can of corned beef, and a cap full of garlic powder, and you'll get few complaints. I buy it in the 5 lb bags, and stack it on the shelves, cackling like a fiend.

Toilet paper and maxi pads. Store them in your attic, and save some money on heating costs. The pads will make you a hero with the ladies, and are also good for dressing wounds. Toilet paper makes you a hero with ... just about everyone.

There are tons of other prep items, and so little space, so I'll close with this: look for bargains, look for utility (can/will you use this stuff in everyday life, even if S doesnt HTF?), and look for nutritional value. Peas are cheap, but they don't bring much to the party, unless you just happen to like peas. You get the idea.

thank you, thank you ,thank you.... i never thought about corn beef and spaghetti, or the salmon,okra and gumbo...


only thing about TP and pads in the attic is the possablity of mice nesting so it might be good idea to put them in tubs
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Old 09-18-2011, 09:17 PM
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Do you happen to have an online source for it?
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Originally Posted by Jerry D Young View Post
I've found that coconut oil is the longest storing oil. It is actually solid (a little soft) at room temps. One of the best of the oils for the body, too.

Just my opinion.
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Old 09-18-2011, 10:14 PM
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Here is a link. There are quite a few other places, too.

http://www.healthyharvest.com/search...nd=coconut+oil
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Old 09-18-2011, 11:05 PM
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Originally Posted by MikeK View Post
While having external sources to refill water storage is critical. That water storage itself is just about mandatory unless you have a seriously secure source such as a well in your basement. Water is just too critical to speculate about.
Agreed - you can be in a flood area surrounded by flowing water and you can't drink any of it because it is contaminated. It is quite common for floods to overwhelm sewage treatment plants (which are usually near a river) and cause any community downstream to have to abandon using water from that river.

That isn't even taking into account all the other stuff, including dead animals, that gets swept into flood waters.
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