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Old 06-01-2011, 05:38 PM
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As I think you can see it is different for everyone. How about a scientific approach. Save every receipt for a month or two would be preferable. See what you actually buy by quantity and in what ratio. Then do your preps in that ratio. If 40% by weight of what you buy is rice then have 40% of your preps be rice. If 20% by weight is fruit make 20% of your preps fruit.
JMHO
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Old 06-01-2011, 05:40 PM
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Ramen noodles?.

Seroiusly, imo it's the staple that your body tolerates the best.
Some have allergies/sensitivities to wheat, corn, soy etc so those wouldn't work for them. Beans- how many of y'all would be temporarily 'bugged out" by the rest of your group?
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Old 06-01-2011, 05:43 PM
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Originally Posted by Slats View Post
As I think you can see it is different for everyone. How about a scientific approach. Save every receipt for a month or two would be preferable. See what you actually buy by quantity and in what ratio. Then do your preps in that ratio. If 40% by weight of what you buy is rice then have 40% of your preps be rice. If 20% by weight is fruit make 20% of your preps fruit.
JMHO
Pretty much what we did. Bought what we eat and like the most that will give us best bang (nutrition) for the buck.
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Old 06-01-2011, 05:46 PM
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I'd say wheat. Whether people realize it or not, it's the staple of the western diet. And that's why traditional food storage routines such as the Mormons always depended on it as a staple. It's far more nutritious than the typical white rice that most of us store. It can be sprouted to provide live enzymes and nutrients that are hard to get in typical storage foods. I see a lot of people overlooking it because it requires a grinder to get the most benefit from, but that's a shame because grinders don't have to cost a fortune.
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Old 06-01-2011, 05:49 PM
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I'd say wheat. Whether people realize it or not, it's the staple of the western diet. And that's why traditional food storage routines such as the Mormons always depended on it as a staple. It's far more nutritious than the typical white rice that most of us store. It can be sprouted to provide live enzymes and nutrients that are hard to get in typical storage foods. I see a lot of people overlooking it because it requires a grinder to get the most benefit from, but that's a shame because grinders don't have to cost a fortune.
The very first thing we bought was 400# wheat.

The grinder we got with a few accessories http://www.mykitchencenter.com/Details.cfm?ProdID=1393
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Old 06-01-2011, 05:50 PM
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I go with beans and rice. In equal amounts because I haven't learned of the actual preferred ratio.
The ratio most often quoted for maximum utilization of amino acids is about 3 to 1 in favor of grain. You'll often see quotes of 270-300 lbs grain to 70-100 lbs beans.

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Something tasty that you don't mind eating... for a LONG time... over and over and over again....
Anything can be made tasty if you learn to cook with it. Rice for example. Who wants to eat plain white rice all the time? So don't so it! There are cultures all around the world that use rice as their staple grain and have developed entire cuisines around it. There are so many different things you can do with it that you could eat it a different way for each meal and never have the same meal twice in your life if you wanted to.

Even with the simple staples of rice and beans, there are tens of thousands of possible ways to make it. So there's no excuse for plain, boring food.

Last edited by MikeK; 06-01-2011 at 08:14 PM.. Reason: clarification
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Old 06-01-2011, 05:59 PM
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Agree with Wheat. It is just so versatile. For bread, of course, but also dumplings, pasta, hot cereal, pancakes, tortillas, thickening gravy, etc... depending what else we can scrounge up.

But, while it's an interesting question, variety is best for us, so we stock a moderate amount of many different items.
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Old 06-01-2011, 06:42 PM
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Fat. Without it we die.
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Old 06-01-2011, 06:45 PM
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I've always been told it's the Wheats, especially Einkorn, Spelt and Kamut .
If your allergic, then it would be brown rice, beans, oats, and suprisingly white and yellow corn.
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Old 06-01-2011, 06:50 PM
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Rice goes with everything. You can mix in beans, spices, gravies, cold or hot, it's tasty and keeps for 1 or 2 years in original packaging. Wrap it, flatten it, fry it, all kinds of recipes for rice. I always have at least 80lbs. of it white, dark and mixed.
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Old 06-01-2011, 06:55 PM
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The dandelions growing in my yard.
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Old 06-01-2011, 06:58 PM
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Barley.

Or oats
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Old 06-01-2011, 07:28 PM
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Fat of any type.
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Old 06-01-2011, 08:03 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MikeK View Post
The ratio most often quoted for maximum utilization of amino acids is about 3 to 1 in favor of grain. You'll often see quotes of 270-300 lbs wheat to 70-100 lbs beans.


Anything can be made tasty if you learn to cook with it. Rice for example. Who wants to eat plain white rice all the time? So don't so it! There are cultures all around the world that use rice as their staple grain and have developed entire cuisines around it. There are so many different things you can do with it that you could eat it a different way for each meal and never have the same meal twice in your life if you wanted to.

Even with the simple staples of rice and beans, there are tens of thousands of possible ways to make it. So there's no excuse for plain, boring food.
Thanks. That is valuable information. There is a reason why I follow your posts. Presumably you meant to say rice and beans there.
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Old 06-01-2011, 08:13 PM
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Originally Posted by gallon View Post
Thanks. That is valuable information. There is a reason why I follow your posts. Presumably you meant to say rice and beans there.
It applies generically to any grain and any bean. I just had wheat on the mind as I typed it since typical food storage recommendations are based on wheat rather than rice. But it works out the same regardless which grain you store.

Rice is rarely recommended as the sole staple grain unless someone can't tolerate wheat. To me, rice should compliment wheat rather than replace it entirely. But variety is important. I store corn, oats and lots of barley too. Barley is my favorite grain, despite not being as versatile as wheat or rice.
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Old 06-01-2011, 08:19 PM
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i agree with what everyone suggested rice and beans and the rest makes a good start .

the best way to prepare your food stocks is to sit down with the family and have each of them write down 14 meals that they like to eat. then make a list of all the ingediants for each meal now combine all the ingediants.(example lets say you need a total of 2 cups of milk for several of the meals) this will give you a list of what you must have to make 2 meals a day for 1 week now multiply those ingrediants with how many weeks you want to be covered for food.now lets say you want 1 years supply well then you know you need 2 cups of milk x 52 (52 weeks in a year) = 104 cups of milk is what your going to need ( i would add a little to it for spillage so i would get atleast 110 cups) so now you can look up canned or powdered milk and figure out how much you need


i would start with your most expensive items 1st and work down from there. the reason i say this is, lets say your most expensivest part is buying campbells chunky meals at $1.88 per can and you need 400 cans costing now $752 to help feed your family for 1 year. if you get all your rice ,beans,romain noodles ...ect 1st and inflation jumps up 30% before your able to get everything you need its going to make it extremely expensive to get those 400 cans at $977


if your stocking up for 4 ppl or .i wouldnt put all of one item in ea 5gal bucket(example 1 bucket of rice another of flour and another of pinto beans ...ect),i suggest you put a little of everything in each bucket instead all of one item in your buckets. reason being inorder to make one meal you dont want to open and break the seals on 5 buckets just for 1 meal when you could just break the seal of 1 bucket for several meals
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Old 06-01-2011, 09:15 PM
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My best friend's wife swears it's chocolate!! Says she can't live without it.. lol
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Old 06-01-2011, 09:20 PM
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Meat, and a lot of it.
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Old 06-01-2011, 09:25 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by PaulaMM View Post
I buy a lot of canned meat as we are big meat eaters. Every time I go to our Family Dollar, I buy a couple of canned hams and every can of barbecue chicken they have. In fact, I just got 3 hams and 12 cans of the chicken about an hour ago.
I second this one. Meat and Fat are essential the the diet. Both contains the essential amino acids for cells. Being a diabetic (not on the needle) I have discovered that the human body can live without carbohydrates. If you look at nomadic peoples through out of history you will see that they subside on extremely low carbohydrate intake with Inuits and Eskimos living on almost none (in history, since the introduction of sugers and flours in their life they have gotten heavy and their teeth have fallen out).

Ask any medical expert you know they will tell you (unwillingly) that there is no "absolute" need for carbohydrates in the diet but go without proteins and fat and you are going to die of malnutrition.
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Old 06-01-2011, 10:34 PM
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Beans and grains combined have the complimentary amino acids required to form complete proteins. But you still need a source of fat. That's why most food storage routines focus on them, plus an added source of fat. I hope people are remembering the fats in their food storage programs. They're a serious requirement.
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