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Old 12-02-2019, 04:42 PM
fordtrucksforever fordtrucksforever is offline
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I plan when cabin is far enough along with construction to use a rocket stove for winter. It will have to be made, but maybe use a regular wood stove until that happens.

These stoves require a draft to draw air so wood can burn and carry smoke out the pipe. But that air has to be replaced. If its cold outside, the reason to having stove in use, air gets pulled in thru cracks, openings, or windows and doors. That makes rooms, and outside walls feel drafty and cold where stove cant radiate the heat to.

I was planning to use double wall pipe like is mostly used these days to go thru the wall or roof. I have thin wall stainless tubing scraps to make what is needed. Actually a bunch of coke syrup containers. I cut the ends off and either weld together or crinkle to slip over each other. About 8 inches diameter.

Just feed the smaller 4 inch pipe thru this stainless pipe that will go thru wall to outside. The smaller pipe will be centered by whatever works the best. But with the large pipe left open when exiting cabin would act as a return air source to replace what is used by stove. It will also heat the outside air as it enters.

Possible to add a very small fan to cause a slight positive pressure inside cabin. This will help feed the draft and keep wood burning hot.

I dont have much time using wood burning stoves. They were just about obsolete when I was growing up. Before getting popular again. Any thoughts? Worthwhile or am I just wasting time?
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Old 12-02-2019, 05:14 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by fordtrucksforever View Post
I plan when cabin is far enough along with construction to use a rocket stove for winter. It will have to be made, but maybe use a regular wood stove until that happens.

These stoves require a draft to draw air so wood can burn and carry smoke out the pipe. But that air has to be replaced. If its cold outside, the reason to having stove in use, air gets pulled in thru cracks, openings, or windows and doors. That makes rooms, and outside walls feel drafty and cold where stove cant radiate the heat to.

I was planning to use double wall pipe like is mostly used these days to go thru the wall or roof. I have thin wall stainless tubing scraps to make what is needed. Actually a bunch of coke syrup containers. I cut the ends off and either weld together or crinkle to slip over each other. About 8 inches diameter.

Just feed the smaller 4 inch pipe thru this stainless pipe that will go thru wall to outside. The smaller pipe will be centered by whatever works the best. But with the large pipe left open when exiting cabin would act as a return air source to replace what is used by stove. It will also heat the outside air as it enters.

Possible to add a very small fan to cause a slight positive pressure inside cabin. This will help feed the draft and keep wood burning hot.

I dont have much time using wood burning stoves. They were just about obsolete when I was growing up. Before getting popular again. Any thoughts? Worthwhile or am I just wasting time?
The heat recovered by the outer jacket will cause its own draft and negative pressure, but if you attach a fan directly to the outer jacket to blow heat back in the room, you will have a heat recovery system.

The fan connection to the outer jacket, may be a little tricky, but not that difficult.
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Old 12-02-2019, 05:14 PM
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I have baseboard electric and some ceramic portables. On the wall a BlueFlame 3 burner propane heater no electric require. Have a portable propane IR heater/cooker plus lanterns. My 4 burner cook top is also propane.

My wood stove is flat topped, air tight, big door, brick lined, straight vertical stainless pipe. I should have had the chimney exit at the peak of the metal roof. Had to build a 100# steel roof jack after loosing 3 of the cheaply made 3# ones from the store. First cheap one lasted like 14 years before ice ripped it off. Put on another one lasted a few years then ice. Repeat and it was ripped off the next year so I built my own.

The stove will burn anything. Coal, tires, waste oil...

I want to build a rocket mass heater. The wood feed hole will be on the porch, the mass and heat dome will be in the house. They burn long stuff like limbs and sticks.

I can get a 50 cubic yd (about 10 cords) load of board ends for about $350 delivered. Usually lots of little blocks (I bag them and burn them in the wood stove) and had to set up the chop saw to deal with the long stuff. With a rocket it will be just sorting; stacking or bagging.

I have cooked a lot of fine meals with cast iron skillets and dutch ovens on the wood stove. I have 3 big pots of water on the stove. I like the stainless turkey fryer because it has a valve to drain the hot water right into the solar shower bag. I use the bag to do dishes or take a shower - hook in the ceiling at the kitchen sink and the tub
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Old 12-02-2019, 06:52 PM
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Feed the firebox with outside air.
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Old 12-02-2019, 07:25 PM
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Feed the firebox with outside air.
By plumbing in a vent.
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Old 12-02-2019, 08:07 PM
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Charlie, do you have eyes on stove for cooking?
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Old 12-02-2019, 08:15 PM
arleigh arleigh is offline
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I have been using a wood stove since i was a kid and even then I worked with my dad building fire places for a living .
the secret is using a dogleg in the stove pipe , .
If the pipe goes strait up, so does the heat. if there is an L in the configuration the horizontal portion puts out more heat.
I go through less wood that all my neighbors and had a bigger house and smaller stove.
And I can put my hand on the stove pipe at the ceiling while the stove it's self is at about 500-600 degrees.
2' vertical ,elbow.2' horizontal, elbow vertical to the double wall :required" going through ceiling. I use sheet metal screws to secure pipe and have no issues.
My stove is a shepherds cook stove with an oven. the fire box is slightly bigger than a large loaf of bread.
I also made an adaptor for using propane gas for cooking during the summer months ,but i rarely use it. Gas is a lousy heater compared to wood. but during the summer I don't want to add more heat to the house, so gas works out good for that.
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Old 12-02-2019, 08:30 PM
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No eyes on the stove, but I do have a rack for grilling over coals inside the stove. There is a stainless steel flap that swings down covering about 1/3 of the door opening to help keep the smoke in. It pivots up out of the way allowing me to load in logs a little over 12" in diameter and up to about 2' long.

I have both leg and legless dutch ovens.
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Old 12-02-2019, 10:40 PM
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Most modern air tight wood stoves can be outfitted with a outside air kit. Rocket stoves will not give you anymore BTU or efficiency than one of these. Double and triple wall chimney pipe is not designed to act as a source of combustion air. The biggest reason would be that it would cool off the flue gas in the chimney making draft difficult.
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Old 12-03-2019, 12:58 AM
fordtrucksforever fordtrucksforever is offline
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That makes no sense. Your typical rocket stove removes all of the heat way before it even makes it outside.

Rocket stoves are way more efficient. They bun gas and most of the ash at a lot higher temp than conventional wood stove or fireplace. When working properly there is no sign of smoke coming out of chimney.
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Old 12-03-2019, 07:14 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by fordtrucksforever View Post
That makes no sense. Your typical rocket stove removes all of the heat way before it even makes it outside.

Rocket stoves are way more efficient. They bun gas and most of the ash at a lot higher temp than conventional wood stove or fireplace. When working properly there is no sign of smoke coming out of chimney.
Rocket stoves are snake oil. You will not match or beat a engineered air tight wood stove for efficiency. The addition of large heat sinks such as stone also add nothing to the amount of BTU available. Wood only has so much in it. I liken the rocket stove enthusiasm to the old 100 mile per gallon carburetors that were always talked about but somehow never became available.

The insulation and amount of heat transfer surface in your home dictates the flow of heat (BTU). It is not rocket science.
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Old 12-03-2019, 07:24 AM
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Originally Posted by fordtrucksforever View Post
That makes no sense. Your typical rocket stove removes all of the heat way before it even makes it outside.
The BTU's produced from the wood remains the same.
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Old 12-03-2019, 12:14 PM
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Tagged with interest.
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Old 12-03-2019, 08:51 PM
fordtrucksforever fordtrucksforever is offline
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The BTU's produced from the wood remains the same.
But there is a more complete burn from a rocket stove. Smoke produced from typical fireplace is wood ash that isnt completely burned. Rocket stove burns most of the ash so very little is left to clean out.

The riser pipe in rocket stove is well insulated which holds the heat in. This makes for much higher temps to burn most of that ash instead of being carried out as smoke. You dont loose a large percentage of the potential heat this way. Then the hot exhaust travels in to a larger chamber where it is absorbed and used for radiant heat. By the time exhaust leaves pipe it is nearly ambient temperature.
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Old 12-03-2019, 09:02 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by fordtrucksforever View Post
...That makes rooms, and outside walls feel drafty and cold where stove cant radiate the heat to.

Any thoughts? Worthwhile or am I just wasting time?
I believe "make up air" is best done with a pipe that provides air to a location near the stove. One can even heat the air to prevent any possibility of cold draft. An easy method is to simply run the pipe near the stove. By the time the air comes out, it's warmed.

Stoves that have directly plumbed make up air, can experience significant problems on gusty/windy days. As the pressure and therefore burn rate, can change markedly.

Another reason for make up air that flows into the home is to exchange the air in the home. People may not know that airtight homes are known to have terrible indoor air quality and very high CO2 levels.

While it seems a good idea to insulate the stovepipe, you do get some heat from it. The suggestion above with a "dogleg" is a valid one, as it helps increase the surface area of the hot pipe, at a low level, inside the room.
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Old 12-03-2019, 09:04 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by charliemeyer007 View Post
I have baseboard electric and some ceramic portables. On the wall a BlueFlame 3 burner propane heater no electric require. Have a portable propane IR heater/cooker plus lanterns. My 4 burner cook top is also propane.

My wood stove is flat topped, air tight, big door, brick lined, straight vertical stainless pipe. I should have had the chimney exit at the peak of the metal roof. Had to build a 100# steel roof jack after loosing 3 of the cheaply made 3# ones from the store. First cheap one lasted like 14 years before ice ripped it off. Put on another one lasted a few years then ice. Repeat and it was ripped off the next year so I built my own.

The stove will burn anything. Coal, tires, waste oil...

I want to build a rocket mass heater. The wood feed hole will be on the porch, the mass and heat dome will be in the house. They burn long stuff like limbs and sticks.

I can get a 50 cubic yd (about 10 cords) load of board ends for about $350 delivered. Usually lots of little blocks (I bag them and burn them in the wood stove) and had to set up the chop saw to deal with the long stuff. With a rocket it will be just sorting; stacking or bagging.

I have cooked a lot of fine meals with cast iron skillets and dutch ovens on the wood stove. I have 3 big pots of water on the stove. I like the stainless turkey fryer because it has a valve to drain the hot water right into the solar shower bag. I use the bag to do dishes or take a shower - hook in the ceiling at the kitchen sink and the tub
Do you have plans for that stove? I wouldn't mind building something like that for myself. Thanks
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Old 12-03-2019, 10:00 PM
fordtrucksforever fordtrucksforever is offline
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I believe "make up air" is best done with a pipe that provides air to a location near the stove. One can even heat the air to prevent any possibility of cold draft. An easy method is to simply run the pipe near the stove. By the time the air comes out, it's warmed.

Stoves that have directly plumbed make up air, can experience significant problems on gusty/windy days. As the pressure and therefore burn rate, can change markedly.

Another reason for make up air that flows into the home is to exchange the air in the home. People may not know that airtight homes are known to have terrible indoor air quality and very high CO2 levels.

While it seems a good idea to insulate the stovepipe, you do get some heat from it. The suggestion above with a "dogleg" is a valid one, as it helps increase the surface area of the hot pipe, at a low level, inside the room.
What you are saying is exactly what I am trying to accomplish and was asking anyone that may be in the know.

The dogleg is what I am using to surround with a larger pipe where penetration is thru the outer wall. I dont want to cut hole in the floor or a remote pipe running out somewhere else.

But using the same opening where pipe exits, also allows for make up air to return in. It in no way affects the exhaust from stove. But uses the stove pipe to heat incoming air. To me this seemed to be the easiest way so warm inside air is not sucked out with the draft.
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Old 12-04-2019, 11:12 AM
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I would suggest buying a section or two of insulated double wall pipe where it goes through the roof. I would be concerned about having lots of joints in my pipe. The more joints the more that can go wrong.

I don't know that there is a whole lot to be gained by adding a fresh air intake on a stove, It is mostly for modern nearly air tight homes where the house is so air tight you can't get a draft in the chimney and end up with a poor smokey fire that chokes you out of the house.

I have seen pictures of air intakes being put on the front bottom of stove that look very dangerous, If hot embers were to fall in there they could cause a fire danger with combustible materiel too close to the intake pipe.
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Old 12-04-2019, 11:18 AM
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Originally Posted by MattB4 View Post
The addition of large heat sinks such as stone also add nothing to the amount of BTU available. .
I disagree. The large amount of mass allows you to burn a very hot, clean fire where the heat gets absorbed into the mass. Once the fire is out that mass continues to radiate the heat into the room.

In a typical wood stove you need to keep a fire going for as long as you want heat and often to get the amount of heat you want it requires choking the fire way down. When you choke a fire down it usually produces smoke which is unburned gasses being wasted going up the chimney, creating smell and pollution.
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Old 12-04-2019, 11:59 AM
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The rocket stove idea dose have some merit , but for a well insulated cabin I really see no point
I would just forget every thing you read and shoot down to Lowe’s and pick up a 6” vent kit for a wood burner .
I use a damper in the flue pipe instead of the bend as stated above,
I like a Jotel 602 Dosent take up much space burns real good .
They can be had for thin money.
I see Russian stoves for sale on creagslist all the time this could be a good fit for a cabin.
My cabin has a insulated concrete tile floor , if I start burning hot it takes days to heat up the floor but with a ceiling fan spinning on slow in reverse the place warms in 12 hours , at this point I can just burn 3 splits every 4/5 hours or so .
I let the fire go out over night with coals left in the morning.
This past week the out side temp where 15/25o in side was 68/75 o with a small fire .
You could add a outside vent kit but my stoves are in the center of the house , you have enough air sneeking in to vent the stove .
I see 0 temps almost all winter and my cabin is 2500sf
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