commuting long distance for work and shtf - Page 2 - Survivalist Forum
Survivalist Forum

Advertise Here

Go Back   Survivalist Forum > >
Articles Classifieds Donations Gallery Groups Links Store Survival Files


Notices

Urban Survival Urban survival and disaster preparedness including hurricanes, earthquakes, floods and anything else.

Advertise Here
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
Old 11-13-2019, 06:47 AM
IndMechanic's Avatar
IndMechanic IndMechanic is offline
Prepared
 
Join Date: Jun 2018
Posts: 290
Thanks: 0
Thanked 382 Times in 167 Posts
Default



Advertise Here

Quote:
Originally Posted by lasers View Post
Have you ever walked or biked 54 miles?

The most I have ever walked because of a broken down vehicle was about 20 miles. It took about 6 or 7 hours. By the time I was done my feet were quite sore, I don't know I could have done another 24 miles. Since then I had a job that I walked nearly 20 miles every day, that same hike when I had that job would have been no problem.

The most I have ever rode a bike was about 25 miles, it took maybe 3 hours. The next day I could barley get out of bed I was so sore. Yet with some training others could do that same 25 miles without breaking a sweat.

If you plan to cover that distance either of those ways it may be a good idea to make sure you are in shape to be able to do it.


Is there a way to make the distance less? Change jobs? Move? Those may sound like extreme solutions but living close to work can have lots of benefits especially if you don't much care for the job you have now or don't really care for where you live now. Being 54 miles from work adds two hours to every work day.

I used to have a 35-45 minute drive to work and now have a 10 minute drive. With a short drive it costs less in fuel, don't have to leave as early or get home as late, if I have vehicle problems it is easier to get a 10 minute ride from a friend than a 45 minute ride, in bad weather a short ride is less stress and probably safer than a long ride to work. Obviously if I need to walk home from work I could do the 10 minute drive in a couple hours, the 45 minute drive probably couldn't be done by me in a day.
My job has me on my feet all day long and my pedometer says I have anywhere from 8-11 miles. Granted, that’s not going to touch a 54 mile on foot commute, but I think it has me up to the challenge should it arise. I’m certain that a bike of some sort will be a huge asset too.
Quick reply to this message
Old 11-14-2019, 11:23 AM
Hiker72's Avatar
Hiker72 Hiker72 is offline
Hiker
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Location: South Central Ohio
Age: 47
Posts: 626
Thanks: 766
Thanked 627 Times in 404 Posts
Default

I have a 120 mile round trip. Going home from work will be the biggest challenge - it's all urban. If there is a civil disturbance or some other major catastrophe that forces me to walk I think the biggest advantage I have currently is that I work nights.

I maintain some supplies at work in the event I have to wait there. And there are plenty of other supplies there as it's a huge office/warehouse facility. Being the security supervisor gives me the keys to the kingdom and access to anywhere.

Another plus is we have a 24/7 emergency operations center - it also serves as a back up EOC for the city/county if needed. We have 24/7 special duty law enforcement on site as well. Basically during an event I'd utilize all this as additional information sources to go/no-go.

Vehicle itself I have basic supplies and an overnight bag - just some clothes and hygiene items. Mainly in case of weather emergencies.

Then I have my dedicated GHB for when it really goes to crap and I'm walking. It's fairly typical I think of the variety. I check the gear a few times a year and set it up for warm/cold weather as needed.
Quick reply to this message
Old 11-14-2019, 12:50 PM
boomerweps boomerweps is offline
The Lieutenant
 
Join Date: Aug 2011
Location: North western PA
Posts: 1,470
Thanks: 19
Thanked 1,936 Times in 802 Posts
Default

A folding bike in the vehicle OR a standard mountain bike or folding bike stashed at work.
Quick reply to this message
Old 11-14-2019, 08:21 PM
Goodwrench708's Avatar
Goodwrench708 Goodwrench708 is offline
SBs Resident Non Prepper
 
Join Date: Jan 2014
Location: Dominican Republic-Georgia
Age: 56
Posts: 5,551
Thanks: 5,299
Thanked 8,776 Times in 3,374 Posts
Default

Something that some folks don’t think about.
Those with long commutes

I know everyone likes all the survival gear and ghb...bobs....etc

But how about keeping a spare change of regular clothes and personal hygiene gear in case of an unexpected need to stay overnight close to work..etc
Quick reply to this message
The Following 3 Users Say Thank You to Goodwrench708 For This Useful Post:
Old 11-14-2019, 08:39 PM
Madoc Madoc is offline
Target Shooter
 
Join Date: Sep 2016
Posts: 441
Thanks: 665
Thanked 993 Times in 332 Posts
Default

My short list at work / in the trunk, on top of the BOB's contents

- broken-in walkin'-dude footwear and poncho

- a folding kick-scooter (fast enough to be useful, slow enough to not get into too much trouble too fast)

- plastic-laminated terrain maps (terrain either side of the highway)

Previously

- caches every 20-30 miles, 10,000 cal plus meds & another water filter and water container and spare socks and underwear and specs
Quick reply to this message
The Following User Says Thank You to Madoc For This Useful Post:
Old 11-16-2019, 08:33 AM
IndMechanic's Avatar
IndMechanic IndMechanic is offline
Prepared
 
Join Date: Jun 2018
Posts: 290
Thanks: 0
Thanked 382 Times in 167 Posts
Default

I haven’t really given much thought to a scooter. I’ll be researching this as well. I would be more limited to pavement on one though.
Quick reply to this message
The Following User Says Thank You to IndMechanic For This Useful Post:
Old 11-16-2019, 11:32 AM
PromptCritical PromptCritical is offline
Junior Member
 
Join Date: May 2015
Location: Michigan
Posts: 233
Thanks: 266
Thanked 399 Times in 144 Posts
Default

If SHTF and transportation was down I don't think I'd be afraid of scavenging some wheels (bike, cart, etc.) along the way. Most people are honest and it is difficult for them to think outside of that box, but if SHTF to this degree...
Quick reply to this message
Old 12-02-2019, 06:48 AM
IndMechanic's Avatar
IndMechanic IndMechanic is offline
Prepared
 
Join Date: Jun 2018
Posts: 290
Thanks: 0
Thanked 382 Times in 167 Posts
Default

The wife has bought me a new maxpedition Sitka Gearslinger for my anniversary gift and I am putting together the contents as we speak. I am also looking at a change of job locations possibly in the next two months as well so I am gearing the bag for that because it will be a night and day difference in its setup when compared to my current get home bag. My current job is literally right off the interstate 54 miles from home and is 98 percent highway miles from home. My new job “fingers crossed on getting it” is 40 miles from home, but will carry me through some bad neighborhoods and slums for the most part with not very much highway miles at all. So like I said it’s basically opposite of what I have setup wise in the packs. A well stocked ifak with chest seals and quikclot is first on my list as well as fire water shelter etc.
Quick reply to this message
Old 12-03-2019, 01:14 PM
Steve_In_29 Steve_In_29 is offline
Semper Fi
 
Join Date: Oct 2012
Location: St John's, AZ
Posts: 5,915
Thanks: 7,387
Thanked 10,394 Times in 3,759 Posts
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by IndMechanic View Post
The wife has bought me a new maxpedition Sitka Gearslinger for my anniversary gift and I am putting together the contents as we speak. I am also looking at a change of job locations possibly in the next two months as well so I am gearing the bag for that because it will be a night and day difference in its setup when compared to my current get home bag. My current job is literally right off the interstate 54 miles from home and is 98 percent highway miles from home. My new job “fingers crossed on getting it” is 40 miles from home, but will carry me through some bad neighborhoods and slums for the most part with not very much highway miles at all. So like I said it’s basically opposite of what I have setup wise in the packs. A well stocked ifak with chest seals and quikclot is first on my list as well as fire water shelter etc.
You might want to investigate a longer trip that routes you away from the above instead of trying to get through it. Especially if you need to do it on foot. Even a vehicle would be iffy as those areas will be some of the first to start looting and a nice car is a prime target.
Quick reply to this message
Old 12-03-2019, 01:17 PM
Steve_In_29 Steve_In_29 is offline
Semper Fi
 
Join Date: Oct 2012
Location: St John's, AZ
Posts: 5,915
Thanks: 7,387
Thanked 10,394 Times in 3,759 Posts
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Hiker72 View Post
I have a 120 mile round trip. Going home from work will be the biggest challenge - it's all urban. If there is a civil disturbance or some other major catastrophe that forces me to walk I think the biggest advantage I have currently is that I work nights.

I maintain some supplies at work in the event I have to wait there. And there are plenty of other supplies there as it's a huge office/warehouse facility. Being the security supervisor gives me the keys to the kingdom and access to anywhere.

Another plus is we have a 24/7 emergency operations center - it also serves as a back up EOC for the city/county if needed. We have 24/7 special duty law enforcement on site as well. Basically during an event I'd utilize all this as additional information sources to go/no-go.

Vehicle itself I have basic supplies and an overnight bag - just some clothes and hygiene items. Mainly in case of weather emergencies.

Then I have my dedicated GHB for when it really goes to crap and I'm walking. It's fairly typical I think of the variety. I check the gear a few times a year and set it up for warm/cold weather as needed.
Sounds like there is plenty of room at work to keep a bike, so you should never need to "walk" home.

If the warehouse is large enough, perhaps you could talk your employer into providing a bike as part of doing your job.
Quick reply to this message
The Following User Says Thank You to Steve_In_29 For This Useful Post:
Old 12-03-2019, 07:38 PM
IndMechanic's Avatar
IndMechanic IndMechanic is offline
Prepared
 
Join Date: Jun 2018
Posts: 290
Thanks: 0
Thanked 382 Times in 167 Posts
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Steve_In_29 View Post
Quote:
Originally Posted by IndMechanic View Post
The wife has bought me a new maxpedition Sitka Gearslinger for my anniversary gift and I am putting together the contents as we speak. I am also looking at a change of job locations possibly in the next two months as well so I am gearing the bag for that because it will be a night and day difference in its setup when compared to my current get home bag. My current job is literally right off the interstate 54 miles from home and is 98 percent highway miles from home. My new job “fingers crossed on getting it” is 40 miles from home, but will carry me through some bad neighborhoods and slums for the most part with not very much highway miles at all. So like I said it’s basically opposite of what I have setup wise in the packs. A well stocked ifak with chest seals and quikclot is first on my list as well as fire water shelter etc.
You might want to investigate a longer trip that routes you away from the above instead of trying to get through it. Especially if you need to do it on foot. Even a vehicle would be iffy as those areas will be some of the first to start looting and a nice car is a prime target.
Already considered it, but it adds almost 40 minutes to the overall travel time and with traffic rush I wouldn’t make it to work on time at all unless I left two hours early.
Quick reply to this message
Old 12-03-2019, 11:38 PM
Steve_In_29 Steve_In_29 is offline
Semper Fi
 
Join Date: Oct 2012
Location: St John's, AZ
Posts: 5,915
Thanks: 7,387
Thanked 10,394 Times in 3,759 Posts
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by IndMechanic View Post
Already considered it, but it adds almost 40 minutes to the overall travel time and with traffic rush I wouldn’t make it to work on time at all unless I left two hours early.
I was talking about a route for your shtf escape plans, not for the daily commute during the good times.

Take the alternate route on your way home every so often to keep updated on anything that might be a problem.
Quick reply to this message
The Following User Says Thank You to Steve_In_29 For This Useful Post:
Old 12-04-2019, 07:06 PM
IndMechanic's Avatar
IndMechanic IndMechanic is offline
Prepared
 
Join Date: Jun 2018
Posts: 290
Thanks: 0
Thanked 382 Times in 167 Posts
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Steve_In_29 View Post
Quote:
Originally Posted by IndMechanic View Post
Already considered it, but it adds almost 40 minutes to the overall travel time and with traffic rush I wouldn’t make it to work on time at all unless I left two hours early.
I was talking about a route for your shtf escape plans, not for the daily commute during the good times.

Take the alternate route on your way home every so often to keep updated on anything that might be a problem.
Ahh dually noted friend.
Quick reply to this message
The Following User Says Thank You to IndMechanic For This Useful Post:
Old 12-05-2019, 10:34 AM
Steve_In_29 Steve_In_29 is offline
Semper Fi
 
Join Date: Oct 2012
Location: St John's, AZ
Posts: 5,915
Thanks: 7,387
Thanked 10,394 Times in 3,759 Posts
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by IndMechanic View Post
Ahh dually noted friend.
Wrote it on your DRW truck? LOL

"duly"
Quick reply to this message
Old 12-07-2019, 10:02 PM
Jim from 28DaysLater's Avatar
Jim from 28DaysLater Jim from 28DaysLater is online now
....
 
Join Date: Nov 2017
Posts: 1,161
Thanks: 1,709
Thanked 1,501 Times in 704 Posts
Default

The furthest I ever walked was 20 miles round-trip. I was pretty young, and I did the first 10 miles at night, then did the other 10 during the day. I did it without any kit, and walked continually, and it was pretty tough.

At least it says something about how likely the hordes could make it far from the cities. I was not in a survival situation... if people are motivated right it's very likely a lot of people could put at least 10 or 20 miles behind them in two or three days. 10 or 20 miles puts them in reach of a lot of places.

And many people could probably make it a lot further after more time passes.

When I think of the get-home situation, the most interesting thing to me is always the possibility that SHTF could slow you down or cause you to have to take a detour. That sounds very plausible to me, based on my experiences in life. Some people like to write about a high rate of travel, but I think problems could add on a lot of time, like maybe an entire day.

People already do zombie movie stuff
or Clockwork Orange stuff sometimes today, even without SHTF. Think how easily they could decide to do it if SHTF. Although it won't necessarily happen immediately.
Quick reply to this message
Old 12-08-2019, 01:38 PM
Uncle Billy's Avatar
Uncle Billy Uncle Billy is offline
In the woods
 
Join Date: Jun 2010
Location: The Lowcountry and Maine
Posts: 503
Thanks: 377
Thanked 452 Times in 224 Posts
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by IndMechanic View Post
Do you guys/gals commute for work? If so, what preps do you have in place should the shtf while you are at work?

I ask because I am always looking to better my preps and foresight with my commute and always hoping for the best while preparing for the worst.

My situation and preps in place: I have a 108 mile round trip drive to work 5-7 days a week. I keep a ghb that is setup for a possible(worst come to worst) 54 mile walk home. The majority of my drive is highway with no city miles. I plan on hand railing on the trek home and then breaking off and cross cutting in areas that are fully wooded and unsettled that I have researched over time. I have multiple ways of obtaining water as well as good foot wear and If unimpeded, I feel that my time until I get home will be approximately 24-40 hours. The time frame will obviously be up in the air and it’s mostly my confidence speaking.

I have considered strategically placing caches along the way, but haven’t made up my mind on that yet. We each prep for different reasons from one another for the most part so my reasons may be different from yours and my loadout is tailored as such.

What concerns do you have for a shtf situation when your far away?

IndMechanic,

Looks like you have a pretty good plan in order, now it's time to make a practice run or two. I don't know where you are, but terrain will dictate how many miles one can travel in a day, generally speaking. Hiking the Swamp Fox Trail in SC I was able to put a good 15-22 miles a day because it's flat trail. Hiking the 100 Mile Wilderness in ME there were days where I could only put 8-9 underfoot because the trail basically runs over mountains. If you're going to be blazing your own trail (bushwhacking) you can cut those distances in half. I'm no pro athlete, but I don't consider myself out of shape either, 6'1" @ 185 Lbs.

I think what you're in search of is a good solid 72 Hr setup. This will be built in different ways for different parts of the country and seasons. Check out my 72 hour bag for hunting and compare it to my INCH bag when I did my first practice run in the middle of winter. Big difference in the amount of gear. I can't really elaborate any further because of so little info was offered. What I can say is you seem to be ready for a practice run. Take two days and see how far you can get on foot while keeping a low profile. That'll give you an idea as to what you need to do going forward.
Quick reply to this message
Old 12-08-2019, 01:55 PM
johnmcd johnmcd is offline
Trapper
 
Join Date: Nov 2014
Posts: 850
Thanks: 349
Thanked 1,300 Times in 504 Posts
Default

There was recently a 5-part article published on SurvivalBlog.com that might provide some useful information for your situation:

https://survivalblog.com/planning-escape-part-1-jmd/
https://survivalblog.com/planning-escape-part-2-jmd/
https://survivalblog.com/planning-escape-part-3-jmd/
https://survivalblog.com/planning-escape-part-4-jmd/
https://survivalblog.com/planning-escape-part-5-jmd/
Quick reply to this message
Old 12-08-2019, 02:06 PM
goat daddy goat daddy is online now
Survivor
 
Join Date: May 2012
Location: California
Posts: 3,358
Thanks: 3,416
Thanked 4,827 Times in 2,063 Posts
Default

When 9-11 went down I drove 35 miles to work in Fresno,CA. each day. I loaded my 9mm and slipped in an a Tyvek suit with respirator into a pack, in the trunk. My thoughts were the suit would protect from debris and whatever. It would also offer some minor protection from the elements. If I had to walk home it would not take over two days. Sometimes less if more. I met a guy backpacking one time. He had a fold up camp cot with a couple of ropes as his back. His camping stuff was sandwiched in the folding cot.. We were in backcountry so it obviously worked. I never had to bug out but I did have to make detours around accidents when the bridges were closed. Make sure you know your area and are flexible.
Quick reply to this message
Old 12-08-2019, 04:32 PM
arleigh arleigh is offline
Survivor
 
Join Date: Oct 2010
Location: southern california
Posts: 11,833
Thanks: 6,807
Thanked 11,245 Times in 5,751 Posts
Default

Each time ai leave the house I contemplate something happening ,
The greater the distances the more interest I take in the area I am passing along the way to note as to where water might be found and where to avoid others.
I have maps of the area and the state.
There are no bodies of water that are an issue, however if there were I'd carry trash bags for floatation and preserving my stuff. trash bags work well as a poncho in a pinch however having a poncho is best and retaining the bag integrity is best .
Under normal circumstances I can walk 4+ MPH, EDC pack and all , however speed may vary due to circumstances and in all practicality tra=vell be done at night using a red lens on my flashlight to maintain stealth.
I have been on over night searches all night long it'a no big deal but maintaining stealth is a big deal. any movement can attract unwanted attention. If things have decayed significantly I expect there will be those in fear taking pot shots and any thing that moves.
It is easier to snipe something going a consistent speed than when the speed is irregular.
While groups have their advantages they will also demand you share your assets'.e. knowledge and food and gear. some may even fallow you to your BOL .
I have thought of caches' but these are only valued if you CAN fallow the prescribed route. both ansan advantage and disadvantage if you must barter for your survival.
I recommend that what is put away be completely expendable , cheap ammo cheap knife ect..
If found by some one else it's not that much lost. Not having all your eggs in one basket so to speak.
Keep a journal so that those a part of your group can find these cache' . even create a code if necessary.
I plan to cache' my stuff before reaching the BOL in the event some one else has taken it I cannot over come. At least I can return to my remaining assets and move on or gather the gear it takes, to take back my BOL.
I have alternatives to my primary BOL with friends but that is not my primary plan.
During the winter months I wear appropriate clothing , so there is not need to pack extra.
Energy bars and water primarily and the usual preparedness gear. I plan to dump the electronics I usually cary if there is no EMP/CME that fries them, which brings me to LED lights will fry as well so having an incandescent light is advisable. Hopefully batteries and solar panels will stand up to the event if not I have spares put away in faraday containers.
Keep in mind that even Diodes can fry in generators especially inverters and their fine electronics .
Quick reply to this message
Old 12-08-2019, 10:33 PM
williammandella williammandella is offline
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2019
Posts: 171
Thanks: 29
Thanked 177 Times in 92 Posts
Default

When I'm headed out of town I throw a dirt bike into the back of my truck. You can also buy a rack that plugs into your receiver, but I don't want to take the risk that someone will hit the back of my truck and destroy the bike. If the roads are clogged with people fleeing, you can ride on the shoulders. For me it's mainly for if I hit a deer and my radiator gets damaged.
Quick reply to this message
Reply

Bookmarks



Quick Reply
Message:
Options

Register Now

In order to be able to post messages on the Survivalist Forum forums, you must first register.
Please enter your desired user name, your email address and other required details in the form below.
User Name:
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.
Password:
Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.
Email Address:
Gender
Insurance
Please select your insurance company (Optional)

Log-in

Human Verification

In order to verify that you are a human and not a spam bot, please enter the answer into the following box below based on the instructions contained in the graphic.



Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 03:15 PM.


Powered by vBulletin®
Copyright ©2000 - 2019, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Search Engine Optimisation provided by DragonByte SEO (Lite) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2019 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.
vBulletin Security provided by vBSecurity v2.2.2 (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2019 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.
Copyright © Kevin Felts 2006 - 2015,
Green theme by http://www.themesbydesign.net