SHTF Food - Ramen vs. Rice vs. Corn vs. Freeze Dried - Page 2 - Survivalist Forum
Survivalist Forum

Advertise Here

Go Back   Survivalist Forum > >
Articles Classifieds Donations Gallery Groups Links Store Survival Files


Notices

Food and water Discussion on food and water storage, water purification and related topics.

Advertise Here
Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
looking for a yr of freeze dried food so.cal.eric Looking for - want to buy 7 01-13-2017 10:44 PM
Premade freeze dried meals vs separate freeze dried ingredients. bestfriendroo Food and water 21 10-08-2016 10:21 PM
DIY freeze dried food jay47544 Food and water 5 11-09-2015 11:37 PM
Best Freeze Dried Food? Leo77 Food and water 39 04-10-2015 07:30 PM
Freeze dried food roadranger Food and water 59 12-07-2014 04:48 PM
MRE vs Freeze Dried Food Kinetic Urban Survival 28 05-11-2012 08:04 PM
Freeze dried food? Sgt Berlyak Food and water 8 01-03-2011 02:07 AM
Freeze Dried Food MMgoose Food and water 10 12-20-2009 01:09 AM
Freeze dried food cloak-n-dagger Polls and Surveys 12 12-15-2009 05:38 AM
Has anyone freeze dried their own food? crazy Farming, Gardening & Homesteading 2 07-13-2009 02:09 PM

Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
Old 02-07-2010, 02:47 PM
JC Refuge's Avatar
JC Refuge JC Refuge is offline
Crisis Preparedness Pro

 
Join Date: Dec 2008
Location: Two steps ahead
Posts: 4,408
Thanks: 197
Thanked 1,604 Times in 519 Posts
Default



Advertise Here

Honestly--generally speaking, 2000 calories a day is the bare minimum you need to figure per adult to sustain yourself at a fairly sedentary level. Most everyobody will lose weight at that caloric intake level. If you need to engage in any physical activity, you WILL lose weight at 2000 calories a day, but you should survive for quite a while before things get critical.

Check the Mayo Clinic Calorie Calculator to figure out what amount of calories you need to maintain your current body weight: http://www.mayoclinic.com/health/cal...ulator/NU00598

On a related note--what is it you are going to store to keep you alive at a later date? That later date is obviously going to be a difficult time--are you going to be cutting corners here now and hoping that you'll be able to figure out to make do with whatever bulk foods, surplus foods, or questionable-quality foods that may not last more than a year or two on the shelf?

Regardless of budget--in fact especially if your budget is limited, do not waste your money on trying to do things cheaper than what is advisable. Store what you eat. If you don't eat what you store (and rotate through it--which most people really don't do), then make sure the food will be good years from now and that it is something you know how to prepare and that your family will not balk at eating.

Psychologically, food is perhaps going to be the highlight of your day in those tougher times. Will the food you have on hand be a positive thing or another disappointment that breaks the camel's back?

Get ready seriously, if you're going to do it at all.
__________________
Safecastle's Preparedness Buyers Club www.safecastle.com
Deep thinkers dig their bunkers. Got shelter? http://www.safecastle.com/sheltershome.aspx
Like Us on Facebook
Quick reply to this message
The Following 4 Users Say Thank You to JC Refuge For This Useful Post:
Old 02-07-2010, 02:54 PM
Phoenixdadeadhead's Avatar
Phoenixdadeadhead Phoenixdadeadhead is offline
Hunter
 
Join Date: Jun 2009
Posts: 1,133
Thanks: 418
Thanked 856 Times in 394 Posts
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by JC Refuge View Post
Honestly--generally speaking, 2000 calories a day is the bare minimum you need to figure per adult to sustain yourself at a fairly sedentary level. Most everyobody will lose weight at that caloric intake level. If you need to engage in any physical activity, you WILL lose weight at 2000 calories a day, but you should survive for quite a while before things get critical.

Check the Mayo Clinic Calorie Calculator to figure out what amount of calories you need to maintain your current body weight: http://www.mayoclinic.com/health/cal...ulator/NU00598

On a related note--what is it you are going to store to keep you alive at a later date? Figuring that later date is obviosully going to be difficult times--are you going to be cutting corners here now and hoping that you'll be able to figure out to make do with whatever bulk foods, surplus foods, or questionable-quality foods that may not last more than a year or tow on the shelf?

Regardless of budget--in fact especially if your budget is limited, do not waste your money on trying to do things cheaper than what is advisable. Store what you eat. If you don't eat what you store (and rotate through it--which most people really don't do), then make sure the food will be good years from now and that is something you know how to prepare and that your family will not balk at eating.

Psychologically, food is perhaps going to be the highlight of your day in those tougher times. Will the food you have on hand be a positive thing or another disappointment that breaks the camel's back?
While Hiking the Appalachian trail, I regularly ate about 1000 calories a day, despite hiking in full gear from sunrise to sunset. I never felt any ill effects. I did lose about 10 pounds in the first 14 days, but it leveled off and my weight stayed steady. I also would pig out about once a week when I would hit a town.
While back country hiking in Montana I ran out of food my last week. Our group had some noodles, tuna and mustard, but 3 days before we made it out we had nothing. After about a day i wasn't even hungry, and when we came out I filled up on a half of sandwich a few crackers and a juice.
Your body will adapt quickly to what ever calories you provide it.
Quick reply to this message
The Following User Says Thank You to Phoenixdadeadhead For This Useful Post:
Old 02-07-2010, 02:57 PM
JC Refuge's Avatar
JC Refuge JC Refuge is offline
Crisis Preparedness Pro

 
Join Date: Dec 2008
Location: Two steps ahead
Posts: 4,408
Thanks: 197
Thanked 1,604 Times in 519 Posts
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Phoenixdadeadhead View Post
While Hiking the Appalachian trail, I regularly ate about 1000 calories a day, despite hiking in full gear from sunrise to sunset. I never felt any ill effects. I did lose about 10 pounds in the first 14 days, but it leveled off and my weight stayed steady. I also would pig out about once a week when I would hit a town.
While back country hiking in Montana I ran out of food my last week. Our group had some noodles, tuna and mustard, but 3 days before we made it out we had nothing. After about a day i wasn't even hungry, and when we came out I filled up on a half of sandwich a few crackers and a juice.
Your body will adapt quickly to what ever calories you provide it.
True, it takes a LONG time to starve to death. Is that what we are talking about? In my preparedness plan, I aim to keep my family alive and thriving indefinitely, not simply prolong their suffering.
__________________
Safecastle's Preparedness Buyers Club www.safecastle.com
Deep thinkers dig their bunkers. Got shelter? http://www.safecastle.com/sheltershome.aspx
Like Us on Facebook

Last edited by JC Refuge; 02-07-2010 at 03:11 PM..
Quick reply to this message
The Following User Says Thank You to JC Refuge For This Useful Post:
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
Old 02-07-2010, 03:26 PM
homesteader1's Avatar
homesteader1 homesteader1 is offline
Free Mason
 
Join Date: Sep 2009
Location: Spartanburg County South Carolina
Age: 68
Posts: 1,100
Thanks: 1,333
Thanked 944 Times in 501 Posts
Default

The people have covered just about everything. I started over two years ago with the idea of three months for my wife and I. After lots of research I extended to 12 months and increased amount for my extended family of 10. Around Christmas I decided to add a young couple and there three children. I buy a variety of food for the storage every week. I can my own meat and meat sauces as previously mentioned in this thread. For the month of January my wife and I ate only stored food. We enjoyed the food so much we now eat most meals out of storage.

Try to find a LDS (Mormon) cannery. They have the best quality and price for staples anywhere. You package it yourself in #10 cans.

My storage cost me about $1200.00 per person.

Good luck and keep us posted
Quick reply to this message
Old 02-07-2010, 04:14 PM
Carne Frio's Avatar
Carne Frio Carne Frio is offline
Survivor, so far
 
Join Date: Aug 2008
Location: Way Up North, Near Fairbanks
Age: 73
Posts: 30,889
Thanks: 67,399
Thanked 244,359 Times in 29,736 Posts
Default

This site had much info on shelf life:

http://www.stilltasty.com/
Quick reply to this message
The Following User Says Thank You to Carne Frio For This Useful Post:
Old 02-07-2010, 04:15 PM
Lono's Avatar
Lono Lono is offline
Long Trump
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
Location: Globalist Occupied America
Age: 67
Posts: 4,428
Thanks: 8,112
Thanked 10,194 Times in 3,324 Posts
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by GlorytoChrist View Post
I got the hashbrowns at
http://www.thereadystore.com/dehydra...otatoes-10-can

24 servings per can, 20-30 year shelf life (thats what they CLAIM). And great backcountry breakfast. Cheesy hashbrowns are my favorite.

Can dimensions are :6.25" x 7" x 6.25"

There's a sale on them right now too, as well on all the #10 canned food. Ends Feb 16
Them's some mighty expensive calories partner!

Servings Per Container about 24 and 70 calories per serving equals 1680 calories per $11.25 can not including shipping. I would have a hard time stocking a years worth of food for 2 active people at that price. Even without shipping the price for 2 people for one year would be $8212 (or to compare to grocery shopping, $685 for a months supply). The one real good thing is the shelf life, that is where the value comes in - very nice if you can afford it!

As a triathlete I have years of calorie calculation experience. In round numbers you need around 1500-2000 calories a day for normal activity. If it gets to the situation that you need this food, your daily activity will soar. I wouldn't want less than 2000 calories minimum per person to feel safe in a SHTF situation. An example of calories used during extreme activity: my hilly 114 mile bike rides used up around 7200 calories in 8 hours. We'd carry energy gels/bars with us and 8 20oz water bottles each which we stashed on a loop route.

For me to maintain my weight in a moderately active environment I need 1500 calories using the Harris Benedict Formula:

http://www.bmi-calculator.net/bmr-ca...dict-equation/

To get your BRM:
http://www.bmi-calculator.net/bmr-ca...mr-formula.php
Quick reply to this message
The Following 2 Users Say Thank You to Lono For This Useful Post:
Old 02-07-2010, 04:18 PM
kate kate is offline
 
Join Date: Dec 2009
Posts: 1
Thanks: 0
Thanked 1 Time in 1 Post
Default

Emergency Essencials is running a special on hash brown potatoes $5.99
Quick reply to this message
The Following User Says Thank You to kate For This Useful Post:
Old 02-08-2010, 08:29 PM
Crash2 Crash2 is offline
Trapper
 
Join Date: Nov 2009
Location: Midwest
Posts: 906
Thanks: 556
Thanked 741 Times in 333 Posts
Default

For some while when I was in my former career, I frequented a discount grocer and bought up cases of various food items and essential Items to last for several months. The signs were there several months ago, so my action has made our transition into a different line of work somewhat less painful and more comfortable. I saw the demise of my job coming and dealt with an economic disaster.
Quick reply to this message
The Following User Says Thank You to Crash2 For This Useful Post:
Old 02-08-2010, 11:02 PM
metrowash metrowash is offline
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Posts: 193
Thanks: 32
Thanked 145 Times in 92 Posts
Default

I agree with some here. TSHTF is not a good time for me to go on a crash diet. It's OK to be 300-500 calorie deficient per day. At that rate I could last a looooonng time and feel no ill effects. But we will already be under emotional and some physiological stress. Why compound problems by being severely calorie deficient?


JoeyMac, consider some dietary fiber in your diet
Quick reply to this message
The Following User Says Thank You to metrowash For This Useful Post:
Old 02-09-2010, 03:42 AM
lanahi lanahi is offline
Survivor
 
Join Date: May 2009
Location: Northcentral Idaho
Posts: 4,805
Thanks: 7,362
Thanked 5,909 Times in 2,481 Posts
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by MikeK View Post
I'm not a fan of freeze dried prepared meals at all, for a number of reasons. Expense being just one. Now freeze dried individual ingredients can be exceptional, depending on which ones.

Since you're stocking on a budget, I'd suggest focusing on inexpensive staples to start with. Beans and grains makes a good place to start. They're cheap and provide protein and carbs. If you sprout the beans, they provide a considerable boost in vitamins also. Remember variety! No sense laying in several hundred pounds of the same kind of beans and plain ol' white rice when there are so many different types available. Popcorn is cheap in bulk and makes better cornmeal and grits than you could buy. Stores longer and is cheaper too.

Also, start doubling up on the foods that you use now. Buy 2, use one, repeat. This gives you foods that you're familiar with and adds variety. The beans and rice will help stretch that out.

Later on, as you get farther in, you might look into dehydrated foods. They have several bonuses over freeze dried. They're less costly. Bought in bulk, they're less costly per serving than wet canned foods even. They're far less bulky since they shrink as they dry, unlike freeze dried. And the quality is good. Most of them are fresher tasting and more nutritious than the canned version. They're closer in taste, texture and nutrition to frozen than canned.

Another big cost saver is being able to can your own foods. There's a bit of investment to get started, but it's not that bad. You can find meats and veggies on sale, grow your own, etc., and put them away. You can make your own meaty pasta sauces that are way better than anything you can buy. Boil up some pasta and dump on a jar of your home canned sauce...yum!

Most importantly though. Don't overlook water! I can't count the number of "I have 6 months worth of food and 1-2 cases of bottled water" type posts I've seen. Realistically, since water is FAR, FAR more important than food, it should be addressed first. Store way more than you think you need, and try to plan alternate sources also.
Remember you've also got water in your hot water tank and back of the toilet tank. Without water you should really not eat anything because digestion requires water. Dehydration is a killer sooner than starvation will ever be. Within a week of not having water, you will be in bad shape. You can melt snow and ice in the winter, of course.

Among the canned goods I would stock are vegetables packed in water. It would help for awhile, though it wouldn't be enough for long. There are some vegetables that have more calories than others because of their high starch, like corn and potatoes. I have different kinds of vegetables packed in water to make stews, but mostly sliced potatoes and corn. I've got them freeze dried or dehydrated too, but I'm trying to cover all my bases for different situations that might come up. I've got a stream nearby and filters but I may be in a situation where it isn't safe to go out for water right then.

Other threads cover cisterns and collecting rain off the roof.
Quick reply to this message
Old 02-09-2010, 03:57 AM
lanahi lanahi is offline
Survivor
 
Join Date: May 2009
Location: Northcentral Idaho
Posts: 4,805
Thanks: 7,362
Thanked 5,909 Times in 2,481 Posts
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Phoenixdadeadhead View Post
Ramen is easy to make from scratch.
Stick to the basics
Flour
rice
powdered milk
eggs (fresh and powdered) Live chickens are even better if you have the area
sugar
salt (lots of salt)
canned vegetables
canned fruit
dried or canned meat
dried oats (oat meal)
corn meal
COFFEE!!!!!!!!!
Some people might think of sugar as useless junk food, but it isn't if you have any sour wild fruits around. The sugar makes it possible to eat them without it being too bitter. It also preserves food and helps pectin solidify in jams. Sugar or other sweetener is also a good comfort food, which can be important in a time of crisis.
Brown sugar mixed with just enough water to cover, can be simmered down until the consistency is right for syrup...it's just as good as what is in the store as pancake syrup.
Unsulfered molasses is a good source of iron and can be used for gingerbread or over hot cereals.
Honey never spoils because it is too acid for germs to grow in (although it doesn't SEEM acid). Honey was used in many wars when antibiotics were not available, and it did the job on wounds. It is soothing for sore throats and helps medicine go down too. Darker honey is more nutrient rich...the color comes from the pollen (honey would be clear as water without pollen). If there is no dark honey in grocery stores, a local beekeeper would have it probably.
Quick reply to this message
The Following 2 Users Say Thank You to lanahi For This Useful Post:
Old 02-12-2010, 10:35 PM
JoeyMac JoeyMac is offline
 
Join Date: Feb 2010
Posts: 12
Thanks: 1
Thanked 13 Times in 6 Posts
Default

reposted elsewhere
Quick reply to this message
Old 02-14-2010, 06:40 PM
MikeK's Avatar
MikeK MikeK is offline
Walking methane refinery
 
Join Date: Jul 2009
Location: Texas
Age: 56
Posts: 63,940
Thanks: 129,389
Thanked 152,741 Times in 44,507 Posts
Awards Showcase
Outstanding Member 
Total Awards: 1
Default

Sugar might just be empty calories, but as you said, it's an important ingredient for comfort food. We're not normally dessert eaters here, but I bet we'd be making them during a SHTF crisis. Not only for the added calories, but for the comfort aspect. Even little pleasures like that will go a long way in a stressful world that has few of them to offer.
Quick reply to this message
The Following 3 Users Say Thank You to MikeK For This Useful Post:
Old 02-14-2010, 09:35 PM
KaBar67's Avatar
KaBar67 KaBar67 is offline
Survivor
 
Join Date: May 2008
Location: New York
Posts: 8,153
Thanks: 9,571
Thanked 7,428 Times in 3,474 Posts
Default

JoeyMac:
I think if you are going to do this for the long term, you need a majority of your preps to be in everyday food. If you eat rice weekly, stockpile rice, but get like 50-100 boxes of Rice A Roni too. If you eat beans, store dried bean in mass, but get cans too. Ramen Pride are good if you throw away 1/2 the salt package, but get like 100 boxes of regular pasta, or whatever suits your needs.

i eat and store oatmeal. If you are just storing for yourself, get what you will eat, b/c you very likely will have to eat it all yourself either way!
Quick reply to this message
Old 02-14-2010, 11:02 PM
Roguetoad Roguetoad is offline
 
Join Date: Feb 2010
Posts: 5
Thanks: 0
Thanked 4 Times in 1 Post
Default

I store rice/beans/pasta for extended periods, and MH for camping. MH is just to expensive for long term storage.
Quick reply to this message
Old 02-14-2010, 11:51 PM
lanahi lanahi is offline
Survivor
 
Join Date: May 2009
Location: Northcentral Idaho
Posts: 4,805
Thanks: 7,362
Thanked 5,909 Times in 2,481 Posts
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Roguetoad View Post
I store rice/beans/pasta for extended periods, and MH for camping. MH is just to expensive for long term storage.
Most could probably afford a can of MH every few months. There are a couple of foods that are good to have, such as powdered butter, powdered sour cream, or powdered eggs, that can be used for baking or other ways. If you don't have a goat and chickens, it's kind of hard to keep these around any other way.
I don't think their prepared meals are worth it, but single food in FD or dehydrated surely can be, and when you consider their price per serving, it is very reasonable and even cheap. In many cases, if you figure the cost per serving of dehydrated versus grocery can, the MH will be less expensive and take up less room in storage.
I have #10 cans of different kind of vegetables and a few FD meats so that I can make a variety of dishes from them, stews and casseroles, and every other way you usually use them.
Once they are opened, if kept free of moisture, most dehyrated or FD foods will last over a year without spoiling, so it is easy to mix ingredients together from opened cans to give much variety, and the taste is often better than grocery store cans.
Do a cost comparison per serving and see what you come up with.
One other thing I like about FD or dehydrated #10 cans is that we might not have refrigeration available in certain scenarios and by using only what you need at the time from the #10 cans, you can always have fresh foods instead of the problem of food spoiling if you only want a little of it instead of a whole can of something.
Quick reply to this message
The Following User Says Thank You to lanahi For This Useful Post:
Old 02-15-2010, 12:06 AM
Cryptkeeper's Avatar
Cryptkeeper Cryptkeeper is offline
Survivor
 
Join Date: Dec 2007
Posts: 8,228
Thanks: 5,657
Thanked 6,661 Times in 3,314 Posts
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by JoeyMac View Post
I've recently become interested in survival (beyond guns & ammo) and have been doing some research into food/water solutions.
After some research here are three of my strategies for having enough food & water to last my family around 12 months.
Keep in mind I am not very well off and plan on adding to my SHTF storage a little at a time with my weekly grocery trips.
Do any seem viable for short and intermediate term SHTF situations? Are my assumptions valid? Suggestions?

Assumptions:
Minimum 1300-1500 calories & 50g-70g protien per day along with all the necessary nutrients.

Ramen: 380 calories per pkg would require about 4 pkgs per day providing ~1500 calories and 40g protein.
Obviously sodium is 2 times too high but that is optional as the msg and salt is contained in the packets.
I have a gut instinct that surviving on ramen might give me cancer or some terrible disease.
Pros: At $0.15/pkg Ramen would cost about $4/week to survive or about $200 for a 1yr supply per person.
Cons: Ramen provides nearly no nutrient content. Nutrient supplementation is required. Only ~3yr shelf life.

Enriched Long Grain Rice: 2 cups (dry) provide almost 1300 calories and 24g of protien as well as a couple of useful nutrients.
Many eastern nations use rice as a staple... I'm confident that with nutrient supplementation this plan is viable.
Pros: Buying in bulk would cost about $5/wk to survive or about $260 for a 1yr supply. I assume shelf life is long.
Cons: Nutrient supplementation is required. Requires water and decent amount of preparation.

Corn (grits/cornmeal/maize...): 2.25 cups (dry) provide about 1350 calories and 38g of protien as well as a few useful nutrients.
Very similar to rice for all practicle purposes. Shelf life might be less, but it's also packaged in cardboard from the store.
Pros: Cost would be about $6/wk to survive or about $310 for a 1yr supply per person. I assume shelf life can be improved.
Cons: Nutrient supplementation is required. Requires water and decent amount of preparation.

Freeze Dired Prepared Meals: Stores like Costco provide prepackaged freeze dried meals enough for a 1yr supply.
Basically, it's real food except freeze dried. Lots of variety, lots of nutrition... as close to regular eating when SHTF as it gets.
Pros: Excellent nutrition & variety, 25yr shelf life, very little prep time/effort to reconstitute.
Cons: Cost about $1000/yr per person but easily the best value. Takes up a lot of physical space.

Nutrients: Bottled vitamins generally have 100% of daily nutrients required plus they only cost $20/yr/person in bulk.
Despite the chosen plan, nutrient supplementation via vitamins will be utilized - it is too cheap given the benefits to overlook.
I figure I will just crush them up and add them to meals to aid absorption. Do vitamins have lengthy shelf lives?

I have not thought of a solution for water.
If SHTF tomorrow, aside from freezing to death, I guess I'd rig up some sort of cisturn with my downspouts and boil the water.
Maybe run the water through a crude particulate filter to get out the bigger stuff.
I have a whole-house water filter/softener... but it's computerized and requires water pressure to operate.


this is more of teaching you how to make up 1yrs worth of food but its also a great and cheap way to make MRE's







just look up homemade MRE's on youtube there are several

the best thing to do is stockup on what you eat and eat what to stock up on is isnt goign to do you any good if you buy $500 worth of spam and you dont really like spam. get what you and your family will eat. and DO NOT TELL ANYONE your stocking up ,not even your best friends.

vitamins once you open the bottle the vitamins start to lose their potency. so get vitamins in small bottles like no bigger than around 100-150 count (3 bottles will be over a 1 yrs supply)
Quick reply to this message
The Following User Says Thank You to Cryptkeeper For This Useful Post:
Old 02-15-2010, 04:06 PM
rifleman87's Avatar
rifleman87 rifleman87 is offline
striving for perfection
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
Location: Somewhere in Michigan's LP
Age: 57
Posts: 113
Thanks: 62
Thanked 71 Times in 41 Posts
Default Ramen noodles

I just tried Ramen noodles for the first time last weekend, after I finished eating them I thought they were not too bad, I will take them on a camping trip. Then within 3 minutes after finishing I vomited them, I could not eat anything for about 4 hours after that. I am not sure if I just got a bad bag or if I am alergic to something in them, anyway I will not buy them again.

I too just brought a few #10 cans of hash browns from Emergency Esstentials for $5.99( http://beprepared.com/Default.asp?bhcd2=1266271253 ).
Quick reply to this message
Old 02-15-2010, 04:10 PM
Indiana_Geoff Indiana_Geoff is offline
Prepared
 
Join Date: Feb 2010
Posts: 255
Thanks: 0
Thanked 252 Times in 116 Posts
Default

The US elcheapo ramen noodles always make me feel like crud. Go to a Chinese/japanese market. They don't cost a lot more and they are a LOT better.
Quick reply to this message
Old 02-16-2010, 08:43 PM
MikeK's Avatar
MikeK MikeK is offline
Walking methane refinery
 
Join Date: Jul 2009
Location: Texas
Age: 56
Posts: 63,940
Thanks: 129,389
Thanked 152,741 Times in 44,507 Posts
Awards Showcase
Outstanding Member 
Total Awards: 1
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Indiana_Geoff View Post
The US elcheapo ramen noodles always make me feel like crud. Go to a Chinese/japanese market. They don't cost a lot more and they are a LOT better.
They cost quite a bit more in my area. I can buy a case of the cheapo kind for what 2 packs of the good stuff costs. Even at that, I won't buy the cheapo stuff because it tastes like a salt lick to me. The real asian ramen is very good and the variety is amazing.

Quote:
Originally Posted by rifleman87 View Post
I too just brought a few #10 cans of hash browns from Emergency Esstentials for $5.99( http://beprepared.com/Default.asp?bhcd2=1266271253 ).
I like the dehydrated hashbrowns so much that I buy the bulk bag now and repackage them into buckets. Dang good eatin'! Supposedly Costco sells them in large boxes too, but my local one doesn't stock them.
Quick reply to this message
Reply

Bookmarks

Tags
calories, calories after shtf, corn, counting calories, food after shtf, food supply, freeze dried food, ramen, ramen noodles, rations, rations after shtf, rice, shtf, shtf food, shtf foods, stockpiling food



Quick Reply
Message:
Options

Register Now

In order to be able to post messages on the Survivalist Forum forums, you must first register.
Please enter your desired user name, your email address and other required details in the form below.
User Name:
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.
Password:
Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.
Email Address:
Gender
Insurance
Please select your insurance company (Optional)

Log-in

Human Verification

In order to verify that you are a human and not a spam bot, please enter the answer into the following box below based on the instructions contained in the graphic.



Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 06:39 AM.


Powered by vBulletin®
Copyright ©2000 - 2019, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Search Engine Optimisation provided by DragonByte SEO (Lite) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2019 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.
vBulletin Security provided by vBSecurity v2.2.2 (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2019 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.
Copyright © Kevin Felts 2006 - 2015,
Green theme by http://www.themesbydesign.net