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Old 08-25-2019, 02:18 AM
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I live in Arizona near Phoenix. I haven't started to prepar my family in case of a national disaster. I'm ready and would like advice on how to get started. I'm feeling like Arizona isn't a good place to bug out. Would it be best to move on the coast closer to water in the event that SHTF?
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Old 08-25-2019, 03:04 AM
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What sort of disaster are you worried about?

Otherwise the boring stuff is unfortunately the most useful. So fill your car before you buy a survival knife. That sort of thing.
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Old 08-25-2019, 03:17 AM
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Moving to salt water might no be the best idea.
Head towards water that you can drink.

There are jobs in Payson
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Old 08-25-2019, 04:28 AM
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If you are thinking about moving, there are so many options people could, and have written books about them.

But in general, what you are looking for is low population places.

The coasts of this country really do not qualify, virtually all of them are highly populated.

I am in Montana, so not an Arizona expert, but I suspect there are probably good places in AZ to head to, as long as you are avoiding the cities, heading into the hill where there is water and shelter perhaps.

A lot of us would like to give advice, but knowing nothing about you its hard for US to know where to start.
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Old 08-25-2019, 06:35 AM
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People have survived in most every locale. What has happened is that modern technology (water supplies, air conditioning, transportation, shipping food, etc has distorted the basic concept of survival in certain areas. Phoenix being a perfect textbook example.

Phoenix has about a million and a half more people in it now than could be supported naturally because of the various technologies (plus many others) mentioned above.

Depending on your circumstances, family, job, age etc, you may or may not wish/need to move. Arizona (and every other state) does have areas that are well suited for survival (not the large population centers) generally speaking.

Not a bad idea to move away from Phoenix if you wish to have the greatest chance of survival in the event of a disaster but like Aerendel said, not enough background information. Despite popular belief, there are places in Arizona with plenty of water and basic survival needs (but they might be over run by other Phoenix refugees).
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Old 08-25-2019, 07:21 AM
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I think I kind of get what the OP is trying to say. Arizona is one of the "portal states" where people will pass through either to get into or get out of the U.S. This was what happened during the Great Depression when people moved through Arizona to get to California in those days. The strain on supplies and water resources hurt that state for a long time even after the Depression was over. Imagine a city like Phoenix with a 1 million population suddenly jumping up in size to a city of over 10 million people trying to live off of what's presently in place. It wouldn't be pretty at all. I think that the OP's concern is very valid.

Another thing along the way that happened to hurt states like Arizona, New Mexico and Nevada was when California blocked its state's borders to open admission. At one point in the Depression the State of California had troopers block off access to California "to keep out the Okies." While this action was frowned upon by the neighboring states around California, those neighboring states suffered as a backlog of people waiting to get into California sat it out all along the roads leading up to the borders going into California. Imagine that happening all over a second time. I think that the OP might be on to something here because history is known to repeat itself.

To the OP, if you are planning to abandon Arizona I would head north and west and not towards California. I would be looking at Washington State and Oregon for my final destination in some fashion. We're talking about fresh water, salmon and being able to scoot right up into Canada, if need be, to head up the Alcan Highway and towards Alaska if need be. If you head towards California you'll probably end up being another face among all those other faces who have rushed out there to get away from whatever has befallen our nation or the world. In the Pacific Northwest you'll have all sorts of room to hunt, fish and avoid people. Sure, it rains a lot up there and if you sit still longer than 5 minutes moss will grow on you because of all the wet weather but at least you'll have food, water, shelter and be free.
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Old 08-25-2019, 07:43 AM
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A few ideas.
1- If you can collect rain water, that would be an inexpensive step, that could have a big impact.
2- And having a 50 lb bag of rice is an inexpensive prep.
3- Whole kernel corn is cheep and east to store, so learning how to turn whole kernel corn into tasty food would be a hand skill.
4- If the cost of new containers is an issue, start collecting used food grade containers like buckets and drums.
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Old 08-25-2019, 08:47 AM
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Phoenix metro area is close to 5 million these days
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Old 08-25-2019, 10:02 AM
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Don't 'try' to get started, just get started. There are some very basic things that you can do right away even though there are bigger, long-term questions in play. I don't know much of anything about Arizona, but I think that water storage and purification would be way up there on my list. When you go to the grocery store, buy a few extras (e.g., batteries, canned goods, etc.). Make an emergency use kit for each car (FAK, cash, small flashlight, energy bar, etc.).
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Old 08-25-2019, 10:16 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Tryingtobeready View Post
I live in Arizona near Phoenix. I haven't started to prepar my family in case of a national disaster. I'm ready and would like advice on how to get started. I'm feeling like Arizona isn't a good place to bug out. Would it be best to move on the coast closer to water in the event that SHTF?
I'd suggest starting with four things, probably in this order:

1- Don't advertise or talk about what you're doing with anyone. If you do, you'll have people trying to come take your supplies during an emergency. When you unload supplies you buy from your vehicle, do it in a closed garage so people can't see that you're stocking up or unloading barrels.

2- Water. Get some food-safe barrels for storing water. Search the forum to find suggestions for how to best store the water to avoid mildew, etc. Store more water than you think you'll need. Personally, I would be unhappy with less than a 50 gallon barrel for each person whom you think might be with you in an emergency. That's really only about a month or so of water, IF you ration it.

3- Food. Practice "opportunity shopping." That means, take advantage of deal opportunities that cross your path. When you go grocery shopping, if a food you would normally eat (suitable for long-term storage) is on sale, buy as much of it as you can afford while it's on sale. Up to a year's worth, perhaps. More if it's food that will last a long time, like canned food.

Keep shopping like normal but the non-perishable foods you buy get put into your long term storage. Rotate those long-term storage foods. When you run out of something in the kitchen, restock your kitchen from your long-term storage. That way your stored food gets rotated and stays fresh, and in the long run you'll pay less for your groceries since you'll only be buying most things when they're on sale.

Eventually you'll probably end up buying some bulk staple foods, like rice and/or wheat. But read the forum to learn how to properly pack them away for long term storage so they don't spoil or be ruined by vermin. There are proper and proven ways to do it.

4- Buy a defensive firearm, take classes to learn to use it, practice with it and keep plenty of magazines and ammo for it. In a serious emergency, people will try to take what you have.


* There are other things you can do to prepare. It's a lifelong process, but these steps should at least give you a good start and greatly improve your odds.
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Old 08-25-2019, 10:32 AM
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My recommendation as to how to get started is to start small. You can't buy your way to survival in an event.

Don't get me wrong. You can buy some food and weapons which will probably get you past 30 days. If that is your desire then you can easily buy some things to get you started.

If you want to prepare for something longer term you will need to focus on skills. Skills will be the greatest tool to acquire to get you past 30 days.

Can you grow your own food - anything event longer than a year will require you to grow your own.

Can you purify your own water? - anything longer than 30 days and you will most likely need to purify your own water.

Can you preserve the food you grow? - if you live in a short season (yes I know AZ probably has a longer growing season than the PNW) but the harvest usually all comes at once. Unless you plan on eating 10lbs of tomatoes in a week then you probably should think about how you preserve it.

etc etc.

Now you should mix in some fun things with your preps. It will keep you engaged. I am a gun guy and enjoy all calibers & types. It's the easiest part of my preps. The rest requires more dedication and planning.

Hope this gives a little more than what to buy. Some of the things you can do without the others. ie - you can buy farm vegetables and preserve them different ways before you grown your own.

Enjoy - This endeavor will definitely help you feel more confident and it is rewarding if you focus on self-reliance more than survival.

SF
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Old 08-25-2019, 11:00 AM
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Great comments for you to reflect on OP, don’t turn into a one post wonder. Never do get the point of those folks.

Moving will likely be dependent upon what you all do for work.

The Pacific Northwest is outstanding country IMO, however most standard well paying work is along the crowded section of the I5 corridor (WA & OR), and sections of the I84 (Idaho). Outdoors fun is abundant, just outside most of these concentration areas with ease tho.

Be mindful of the “Cascadia subduction zone” however, if planning a move for WA/OR, and just plan your future preparedness accordingly...
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Old 08-25-2019, 12:20 PM
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Haven't been there in many years but the Rim east of Flagstaff seemed vacant. Trouble with Washington is the population on the coast, and rainfall in Seattle is around 35 inches. Going south to Chehalis is around 50 inches. I lived on a big island on the coast for 25 years so I know conditions pretty well. Northeast Washington has wildland fire problems and my buddy in Washington is always concerned about losing his firearms, though concealed carry permits are very easy to obtain. Gun regulations are a bit rough in Oregon. Lots of vacant country in eastern Oregon but it is a high desert plateau and cold in the winter.

Idaho is good in the Panhandle but south of that sees more population and drier conditions, but lots of fresh water with big rivers and many lakes in some regions. Good gun laws and some counties have populations under 20,000 and rarely grow because they are not on an interstate.

Find an active Mormon in your area and ask them about preparation. They are famous for preparing and their religion tells them to help people in bad times and they can help you learn to prepare and do it at no cost! When you reach their church number with a real person behind it, ask to talk to a Relief Society President. There is one in each unit and she will either know or be able to find someone who can help you. I used to be Mormon and know the system well.
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Old 08-25-2019, 12:22 PM
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I typed a long response and a glitch erased it.

I'll summarize. Write down what are the most serious and most likely SHTF events. These will probably not be a meteor strike or sun flares caused EMP, etc. For most people it's health, finances, and social unrest (violence, urban decay, competition for resources {water, food, land} which requires good financial mobility and self defense.

Hence, focus on health, fitness, finances, and living away from social unrest and where you can legally own guns and defend yourself (e.g. far better in red states than blue states). Coasts are subject to severe weather and severe liberals and their dumb laws.
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Old 08-25-2019, 12:34 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Herd Sniper View Post
I think I kind of get what the OP is trying to say. Arizona is one of the "portal states" where people will pass through either to get into or get out of the U.S. This was what happened during the Great Depression when people moved through Arizona to get to California in those days. The strain on supplies and water resources hurt that state for a long time even after the Depression was over. Imagine a city like Phoenix with a 1 million population suddenly jumping up in size to a city of over 10 million people trying to live off of what's presently in place. It wouldn't be pretty at all. I think that the OP's concern is very valid.

Another thing along the way that happened to hurt states like Arizona, New Mexico and Nevada was when California blocked its state's borders to open admission. At one point in the Depression the State of California had troopers block off access to California "to keep out the Okies." While this action was frowned upon by the neighboring states around California, those neighboring states suffered as a backlog of people waiting to get into California sat it out all along the roads leading up to the borders going into California. Imagine that happening all over a second time. I think that the OP might be on to something here because history is known to repeat itself.

To the OP, if you are planning to abandon Arizona I would head north and west and not towards California. I would be looking at Washington State and Oregon for my final destination in some fashion. We're talking about fresh water, salmon and being able to scoot right up into Canada, if need be, to head up the Alcan Highway and towards Alaska if need be. If you head towards California you'll probably end up being another face among all those other faces who have rushed out there to get away from whatever has befallen our nation or the world. In the Pacific Northwest you'll have all sorts of room to hunt, fish and avoid people. Sure, it rains a lot up there and if you sit still longer than 5 minutes moss will grow on you because of all the wet weather but at least you'll have food, water, shelter and be free.

Actually, it only rains a lot on the Olympic Peninsula. Seattle gets about 35 inches, Anacortes gets 25 inches, Friday Harbor gets around 22 and Sequim, on the peninsula, gets around 15. Most places east of the Mississippi River get over 50. The coast gets a little snow in the winter, just enough to cause major pileups in Seattle due to few people who know how to drive in snow. Lots of people along the I-5 Corridor.

Salmon use to be easy to get in Washington when commercial fishermen caught fish in net boats, but no more. Last time I went to Newport, Oregon, I visited with fishermen on 3 remaining boats, and in Anacortes, 5 years ago I saw no fishing boats in the harbor.

Eastern Washington is OK but you need to be near the mountains for water and such country is prone to fire.

The only part of Alaska with a climate similar to the Washington coast and with low population cannot be reached by road. And interior Alaska could be rough for a beginner prepper.
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Old 08-25-2019, 12:42 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Tryingtobeready View Post
I live in Arizona near Phoenix. I haven't started to prepar my family in case of a national disaster. I'm ready and would like advice on how to get started. I'm feeling like Arizona isn't a good place to bug out. Would it be best to move on the coast closer to water in the event that SHTF?
Its impossible to help you out unless we know exactly what you want to prepare for. In some cases, the advice for one is the complete opposite than for other possible scenarios.

Its like:
"Say, should I cut my leg off?"
"No dude, I dont think thats a good idea."
"Oh, I have gangrene and if I dont amputate it right now I'll die."
"ok, then sure, go for it!"
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Old 08-25-2019, 12:42 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Tryingtobeready View Post
I live in Arizona near Phoenix. I haven't started to prepar my family in case of a national disaster. I'm ready and would like advice on how to get started. I'm feeling like Arizona isn't a good place to bug out. Would it be best to move on the coast closer to water in the event that SHTF?
Go on Amazon and buy the LDS Preparedness Manual for $25 and you will find out about everything you need. This book used to be exclusively for Mormon Church members but is now for the public. You won't find any publication anywhere that will be better, especially for a beginner. I still have mine.
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Old 08-25-2019, 02:08 PM
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Go on Amazon and buy the LDS Preparedness Manual for $25 and you will find out about everything you need. This book used to be exclusively for Mormon Church members but is now for the public. You won't find any publication anywhere that will be better, especially for a beginner. I still have mine.
The 2011 version is available online for free, it literally says it "may be sold at cost only"
https://thesurvivalmom.com/wp-conten...ess-Manual.pdf
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Old 08-26-2019, 12:21 PM
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I lived and worked in a similar desert for over 30 yrs. I believe that a sustained loss of electrical power, and a disruption of food and fuel deliveries is a likely result of many large scale crisis events.

But the desert climate and the lack of free flowing water make it very hard to prepare for a worst case event. So if you were to remain living in Phoenix, you will first have to solve the problem of summer cooling, and how to store enough food and water.

I never really solved the problem of surviving a long term loss of the power grid, during our 115F summer temps. After several short term power outages, I decided to move to an area with abundant rain, and much lower summer temps. I bought a small ranch in Eastern Oklahoma, then retired and moved in 2015.

My advise is to leave the desert. Figgure out a way to find a new job during our current favorable economy. Sell out and move before any major crisis events happens.
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Old 08-27-2019, 08:45 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Tryingtobeready View Post
I live in Arizona near Phoenix. I haven't started to prepar my family in case of a national disaster. I'm ready and would like advice on how to get started. I'm feeling like Arizona isn't a good place to bug out. Would it be best to move on the coast closer to water in the event that SHTF?
Hmmm.... How about in the mountains nearby?

I have a different idea than many here, of what disasters seem likely to come Down the pike, but Generally agree that access to drinking water and ability to grow / scrounge up munchies is likely to be important.

I personally want to be where it's warm, living is simply easier there than someplace that requires elaborate precautions to avoid freezing to death.

I'm used to living without air conditioning or even a fan in the heat.... I have shade trees, and am perfectly comfortable taking a sponge bath in rain water when temps go above 100...

If you aren't prepared to live like that, might be something to consider in preparation for a grid down event.

Where would you like to live? In a perfect world, what climate, what geography most appeals to your sense of etiquette?

Even if nothing happens in your lifetime.... Wouldn't it make sense to live someplace that you enjoyed?
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