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Old 08-24-2019, 11:47 AM
Herd Sniper Herd Sniper is offline
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One of the things that I have noticed is that there are two kinds of mindset in play when it comes to prepping as well. One is based on military training and experiences while the other is based upon civilian training and experiences. Both mindsets and experiences have value.

Within the military mindsets are those who have actually been in combat and those who trained for combat but never made it I into combat. While not having gone into actual combat is a little different than training for it, people who have been through the training and combat have (a.) the actual experience for having been through the combat scenarios and (b.) the knowledge gained from learning how real combat differs from the training for it. While the experience itself is valuable, learning the difference between what you were taught and what really happens in combat is worth more than anybody can explain to most other people.

I'll give you an example... Military rifle ranges and training. For most combat you really don't need to be able to shoot over 500 yards. Any enemy dumb enough to attack you over a clearing or open area that's over 500 yards in length deserves to be shot to death any way. The overwhelming and vast majority of your shooting scenarios will be close range engagements with some of them being darn near arm's length contact distances. That means you need to be able to react with speed and accuracy with instinctiveness and not be wrong.

So instead of setting you up with a realistic rifle training format, the military gives its people general training which covers shooting distances that run from zero to 900 meters or 1,000 yards. Same thing for preparing rucksacks and backpacks too.

On the old web gear, soldiers had a butt pack which allowed them to carry about 2 days of rations and other goods if they wanted to do so. Most guys carried snacks or energy bars/candy in the butt packs for emergency situations. With the old ALICE packs you could, depending on how you loaded them, rig them for 4 or more days so that you could comfortably live out of them. The butt packs were kind of thought of as being for patrols and short recon missions. So the ALICE packs were for long term use and the butt packs were for a couple of days. The old mountain packs were for really long term use or for cold weather operations because they were a lot heavier and held a whole lot more stuff than the other 2 packs did. Think of a mountain pack as being like a dresser that you humped on your back for miles and miles. They were ungainly and weighed a ton.

Those of us who have been in combat or who have been on repeated police tactical operations understand the importance of good tactics. We use cover and concealment to get close to engage a potential target or to spy upon that target depending on our goal. We know that the closer we get to our target the greater that we increase our accuracy of fire and the effectiveness of our firepower. This is why so many people think that the 100 yard mark is a sort of unofficial reference mark for many of them. Couple this line of thought with the idea that police involved shooting distances tend to back up the idea of shorter shooting distances this would explain why so many people look at the 100 yard mark with a degree of certainty.

One other thought mindset that also comes into play is the negative mindset group. These are the people who know, for a fact, that you can not prepare for every situation no matter how well you plan and no matter what all you buy and store. To these people, you do a minimalist approach to prepping and getting ready then hope or forage for other stuff that you might want or need. To a certain degree, these people aren't too far from wrong in their general approach. If you study old Army training manuals, there used to be a whole section in many of those old tomes on the "art of foraging."

Foraging was when troops would spread out across a town or area and seek foodstuffs or supplies useful to military troops. Imagine searching through a small abandoned village and coming across some medical supplies. You know that your own troops can probably use those medical supplies so you confiscate them. Further in you spot a chicken coop with a dozen chickens with nobody around and you also take those chickens to feed your fellow soldiers. This is what foraging is all about: making use of abandoned supplies that your group needs. This is kind of what some of the people using the smaller rucksacks may have in mind: augmenting their supplies, in some fashion, to extend what they have.

This may kind of explain some of the reasons behind what some of the different people here are thinking. When you think about the different ways that people prepare for situations we have a unique way of doing things based off of our individual situations and beliefs. It really is kind interesting to see how different minds work.
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Old 08-24-2019, 12:01 PM
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My thought is that if I bug out everything I left behind including my home will be lost forever. Since I can think of no scenario to re-establish a life with what I can carry with me I plan to bug in. I know it's a gamble but so is a bug out, in both cases I am facing an unknown situation where mistakes can kill me. So I choose to remain with neighbors I know and trust in a rural neighborhood.
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Old 08-24-2019, 01:10 PM
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Thanks for the post! I noticed some key words mentioned...study...learn...most of my friends who are into prepping (to be honest, I don't know many who are openly prepping) focus on acquiring things, and spend little to no time on acquiring skills (the one exception to that being using their firearms). I think having skills can make a big difference in prepping needs. If you are not planning to garden as part of a mid to long range scenario, for example, you are doomed to dried and freeze dried foods. If you can acquire the tools and skills needed to garden then you have a new set of options - most more flexible than not having a garden. Having advanced first aid skills will help you be a smart shopper of materials. If you do not have this kind of knowledge you will end up buying a lot of things you might never use.
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Old 08-24-2019, 01:32 PM
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Great thread.

I'm reminded of the following...

1. "You don't know what you don't know." Meaning that lack of imagination/experience can cause you to ignore critical planning factors, because you aren't even aware those needs exist.

2. "There are things we know that we know. There are (also) known unknowns. That is to say there are things that we now know we don't know. But there are also unknown unknowns. There are things we do not know we don't know." - Former US Secretary of Defense Donald Rumsfeld

3. "It's hard to teach an Old Dog new tricks..."

4. Hope is not a viable Course of Action. - US military aphorism

5. Stay flexible, like Gumby's d* (*male anatomy part) on a hot afternoon... - Astronomy


Part of the art of survival preparation is to continuously expand your awareness of the Unknowns. And then take actions to mitigate them. Rather than resting easy inside of a self-constructed box of inflexible thinking.
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Old 08-24-2019, 01:54 PM
arleigh arleigh is offline
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Most of us have been peppers for years , and in the beginning we feared the inevitable at any time to see degree hoping for a few more weeks to better our resources. After a thousand weeks or so and sorting through all you've acquired certain realities are understood.
The probabilities of needing stuff always exist. having skills to think out side the box becomes more an more important.
How will you fix your boots ?
What if your shot/cut in your back ?
And a number of other realities one might face .leading to ,"you can't do it all alone."
Establishing friends you trust. not can trust, but that you do trust.
In this day and age this is not easy to find .
In some ways I can understand how people in the old days were manipulated by wealth.
Some manipulated by fear and some manipulated by other things .
Some level of control will be the way things are post apocalyptic society .
will you be in control ,or be under some one else's control .
Most people not having been in the service value their selves more than others ,it's human nature . You want me to ""WHAT ""
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Old 08-24-2019, 01:59 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Aerindel View Post
One of things that I see posted fairly often are vast declarative statements bookending a survival scenario.

"I will only ever need to shoot out to 100 yards"

"Its okay my BOB is so light because its only designed for 2 weeks"

"I won't ever need 4WD"

"I'll only ever need to fire a couple shots"
I live in the woods. There's no reason to shoot over a hundred yards because I can't SEE a hundred yards.

My bug out bag is light because it has everything I need to survive. I don't need a silcock key because there's nothing around here that it will fit. Same thing for most of the other crap I see in most bobs.

I haven't owned a vehicle that DIDN'T have 4wd since 1987.

I'll fire as many shots as needed.
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Old 08-24-2019, 03:13 PM
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Don't even know if S will HTF even in my lifetime anymore. Remember the topic discussed in the 70's and still hasn't happened. The way it was presented back then it could have been any day. Now days I worry less about it. Come what may at this point.

I'm more prepped for local events, hurricanes, floods, snow, power outages, riots, etc.
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Old 08-24-2019, 03:22 PM
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I no longer even try to prepare for a specific event, I prepare for likely challenges, which repeat through human history.

Challenges like interruptions of electric power, fuel, food, water, medicine, and basic services. Rioting, violence, pandemics, and oppression and corruption by Government.

The best preparation is to store some food and water, avoid living in big cities, extreme environments, or at ground zero of high impact events.
And dont forget to keep your big mouth shut.
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Old 08-24-2019, 03:44 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Aerindel View Post
One of things that I see posted fairly often are vast declarative statements bookending a survival scenario.

In short, I feel like there is an enormous amount of things we don't know about SHTF....things we can't know about it, and that its almost never possible to say "I won't need X" for SHTF because most of what makes SHTF, SHTF, is that its not normal in anyway and so extraordinary amounts, ranges, capabilities are probably going to be needed.

Now obviously, everything ends up being a compromise so its not as simple as just having the best of everything but the whole idea of thinking you know the upper limit of what you need seems to be antithetical to prepping.

IMO, there are are lot of questions for which there is no answer but which none the less, people should be asking themselves.
Any declarative statement is likely as absurd as is the futility trying to prepare for every scenario or situation.

There are budget limits, training limits, physical limits, basic struggles of prioritization, and likely the most important, how to truly assess the most probable SHTF and associated threat vectors for your environment.

Everyone could and should be able to "what if" themselves to death; however, most also have to balance with a certain amount pragmaticism. Any declarative statement without any semblance of statistical analysis, experience, or training is simply moronic. While "anything" is a possibility, you likely don't have enough resources or time to invest in less-probable events or situations. Experience just has to be applied to determine how your resources and time should be invested.

As a simple analogy, let's take long-range shooting. It takes more effort and skill to be a competent and consistent long-range shooter. For me, that's anything beyond 500 meters. That may be a common range for others, but it's highly dependent on the individuals skill and ability to train at those distances. Historically, most combat ranges have been around 100 meters. Just about all deer hunting in my area is within 100 meters. Most self-defensive shootings (by far the most common events) are vastly closer as well (I'll just take a semi-wild-a$$-guess/SWAG) like inside 25 meters.

Given I don't have easy access to ranges beyond 500 meters, and considering my environment doesn't really provide those types of shot-ranges, I also know my personal skill limitations which (for me) concludes that type of distance shooting is not high on my priority list. I'm not discounting it, I'm just not applying the probability, resources, and skill necessary to prioritize it higher, and I don't.

I could do this for any number of situations, skills, or investments in specialized gear. I don't discount the value, but their priority is much lower based on my personal application, resources, skill-limitations; and more importantly, how to assess levels of risk and probability. Everything involved with SHTF will likely end up a compromise. No one is going to be prepared for everything. It's not feasible or practical.

I don't plan, prepare, and invest for the "exceptions", but I do for the most likely or probable. After that, it's all about adapting, improvising, and dealing with Mr. Murphy. As a distance backpacker, you can't pack all your fears or carry every "what if" piece of kit. You can use your experience to cover the most likely and most probable situations and adjust from there.

It's great question and should make everyone reassess their own plans, skills, and priorities of effort. Making any declarative statement is stupid at face value, but it's also easy to get caught up in one particular focus and ignoring the dozens of others that may be just as or more important for the most probable SHTF situation.

ROCK6
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Old 08-24-2019, 03:57 PM
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`

I don't have to worry about any of that, as all my guns were lost in a tragic boating accident.

.
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Old 08-24-2019, 04:04 PM
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I look closely into mankind's historical SHTF events and extrapolate them into today's world. Of course, I see potential technological nightmares in the face of severe disasters because we have stupidly built a society so fragile that long-term widespread power outages can cripple it.

For decades, I have been getting my mindset and skills in sync with several possibilities based on worse-case scenarios. But, honing my skills, forward thinking, and continuous spiritual growth has given me peace of mind knowing that I have done all I can to prepare for the possibility of history repeating itself, which it has often done since the dawn of man.

In the meantime, I don't let possibilities get in the way of my day-to-day *joie de vivre.



*Joie de vivre = joy of life
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Old 08-24-2019, 04:51 PM
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I think part of the "problem" with the questions OP has here is that being a "prepper" can mean a lot of things. We all have our preconceived ideas of what we think necessary to prepare for. And our limitations to how well we can prepare will also dictate how we prepare.

I myself see two main full blown SHTF events that would lead to a complete collapse of our society as the top of my list. EMP/Solar Flare and collapse of the US dollar. Both would lead to a WROL scenario. Both would make it so that you should have more ammo and be able to shoot way further than 100 yards. Both would also make it so that you should be able to grow and preserve your own food and have at least a bare minimum of 1-2 years supply of food and many other things depending on your location and skills. If someone is prepping they should be prepping for worst case scenarios. Forget about Aliens and pole flips and whatever else in the weird category and prep for things that really have a strong potential of happening.

After EMP & dollar collapse I also see that we could have a biological out break and a civil war that would leed to a complete collapse of our society. Then there are the further things on my list like Russia's Poseidon torpedo that could wipe our our entire cost line from Maine to Washington state with like 8 or 9 of them. And other such events that could make for a complete collapse. But EMP is the worst case scenario.

If someone is prepping for a complete collapse they will think outside their own box and not just buy and build skills on firearms, though I have more than most. They will also have more money spent on long term food than guns and garden and preserve food and then come up with all kinds of other things that they need for long term. Yes it is a difficult road and there will always be something but keeping balanced is best.
Keeping with the basics of Guns/Ammo, Seeds, Food/Water/Shelter, Medical, Gear is important. Have all bases above covered within your budget and then add to it EVENLY. For example, I have 10 buckets of seeds, but I also have a lot of medical supplies. While gear and guns are fun to buy and I'll admit it is hard to not become unbalanced in this regard, having a lot of gear and guns but not enough food WILL be the downfall of many preppers and prepper groups.

I'm to the point now where I just need one more gun and another 30 years supply of food and I'll be all set!
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Old 08-24-2019, 04:56 PM
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Originally Posted by Herd Sniper View Post
One of the things that I have noticed is that there are two kinds of mindset in play when it comes to prepping as well. One is based on military training and experiences while the other is based upon civilian training and experiences. Both mindsets and experiences have value.

Within the military mindsets are those who have actually been in combat and those who trained for combat but never made it I into combat. While not having gone into actual combat is a little different than training for it, people who have been through the training and combat have (a.) the actual experience for having been through the combat scenarios and (b.) the knowledge gained from learning how real combat differs from the training for it. While the experience itself is valuable, learning the difference between what you were taught and what really happens in combat is worth more than anybody can explain to most other people.

I'll give you an example... Military rifle ranges and training. For most combat you really don't need to be able to shoot over 500 yards. Any enemy dumb enough to attack you over a clearing or open area that's over 500 yards in length deserves to be shot to death any way. The overwhelming and vast majority of your shooting scenarios will be close range engagements with some of them being darn near arm's length contact distances. That means you need to be able to react with speed and accuracy with instinctiveness and not be wrong.

So instead of setting you up with a realistic rifle training format, the military gives its people general training which covers shooting distances that run from zero to 900 meters or 1,000 yards. Same thing for preparing rucksacks and backpacks too.

On the old web gear, soldiers had a butt pack which allowed them to carry about 2 days of rations and other goods if they wanted to do so. Most guys carried snacks or energy bars/candy in the butt packs for emergency situations. With the old ALICE packs you could, depending on how you loaded them, rig them for 4 or more days so that you could comfortably live out of them. The butt packs were kind of thought of as being for patrols and short recon missions. So the ALICE packs were for long term use and the butt packs were for a couple of days. The old mountain packs were for really long term use or for cold weather operations because they were a lot heavier and held a whole lot more stuff than the other 2 packs did. Think of a mountain pack as being like a dresser that you humped on your back for miles and miles. They were ungainly and weighed a ton.

Those of us who have been in combat or who have been on repeated police tactical operations understand the importance of good tactics. We use cover and concealment to get close to engage a potential target or to spy upon that target depending on our goal. We know that the closer we get to our target the greater that we increase our accuracy of fire and the effectiveness of our firepower. This is why so many people think that the 100 yard mark is a sort of unofficial reference mark for many of them. Couple this line of thought with the idea that police involved shooting distances tend to back up the idea of shorter shooting distances this would explain why so many people look at the 100 yard mark with a degree of certainty.

One other thought mindset that also comes into play is the negative mindset group. These are the people who know, for a fact, that you can not prepare for every situation no matter how well you plan and no matter what all you buy and store. To these people, you do a minimalist approach to prepping and getting ready then hope or forage for other stuff that you might want or need. To a certain degree, these people aren't too far from wrong in their general approach. If you study old Army training manuals, there used to be a whole section in many of those old tomes on the "art of foraging."

Foraging was when troops would spread out across a town or area and seek foodstuffs or supplies useful to military troops. Imagine searching through a small abandoned village and coming across some medical supplies. You know that your own troops can probably use those medical supplies so you confiscate them. Further in you spot a chicken coop with a dozen chickens with nobody around and you also take those chickens to feed your fellow soldiers. This is what foraging is all about: making use of abandoned supplies that your group needs. This is kind of what some of the people using the smaller rucksacks may have in mind: augmenting their supplies, in some fashion, to extend what they have.

This may kind of explain some of the reasons behind what some of the different people here are thinking. When you think about the different ways that people prepare for situations we have a unique way of doing things based off of our individual situations and beliefs. It really is kind interesting to see how different minds work.
INTERESTING..

DUE to certain life choices.. I was in an environment where on irregular basis I found myself getting shot at and also engaging and returning fire. This irregular basis covered a span of over 30 years. WEll, kinda regular at first then when I started PD work it got irregular.
Bottom line.. no matter how you slice it and dice it... EVERY TIME... is a FIRST TIME when gut check time. I knew cops who had more blood on their guns then Wild Bill Hickock, who almost died because the last one they came up against hit a different cord for some reason. Who knows why? I found when the action was over I was breathing just as fast the last time as I was the first time. You can train for everything but when those rounds are incoming all that past experience can go right out the window if you aren't mentally prepared for it. I am still here because of speed and training with 2 different incidences that were over with before I had time to get ...excited. Something clicked the GO button and reflex took over almost without conscious thought. THAT is what training does. I mean.. who really practices at 100 yards regularly with a handgun? When I was a cop I did.

People talk about prepping and I have made no secret of my great love of "tools" with LEGS because I found that it was much harder for people to kill me if I was out of their range but they were in mine. And who knows what scenario you will face when the balloon goes up and you are sitting there with your favorite .22 as your OPFOR is hiding behind a barricade you can't shoot through with your chosen weapon but a bigger bore could.

I live in the woods and surrounded by forest. It is 3 miles through the trees before the next house out my back door. But, if you look, there are long shooting lanes in the woods, if the bad thing happens can you take advantage of them or are you just a 100 yds shooter because that is pretty much how far you "figure" you will need?

You can prep for pretty much everything but the unknown. Someone said something about needing an imagination.
The other value I have never seen discussed is PATIENCE, and along with that the discipline to NOT MOVE. PATIENCE will keep you alive, movement can get you noticed and get you killed. It is probably one of the hardest things to make part of your life but when things are going weird around you.. sitting and watching and waiting will get you intelligence you might not otherwise get. I learned patience early on because I grew up hunting. It kept me alive in a lot of places.

When I was on my days off from the PD in my 20s I would get to my place up north, camo and face paint up and go out into the woods and just sit, maybe take a book to read and then just remain in the same place for hours the only movement being turning a book page. I had birds land on me, had squirrels and chipmunks run up my legs. Had deer go by close enough to touch.(but don't..really, you do NOT want to reach out and slap a deer's butt as it is walking by you..trust me on this one.)

I see people writing about they BOB or GHB and how they plan to get going and get home as soon as possible... I see no one saying I am going to find a hole and dive in and watch the madness and let it roll by and then move. PATIENCE will save your life if you can have it.
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Old 08-24-2019, 05:56 PM
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I hope I never have to find out how much I need
But if I do ?
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Old 08-24-2019, 06:01 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by NW GUY View Post
INTERESTING..

DUE to certain life choices.. I was in an environment where on irregular basis I found myself getting shot at and also engaging and returning fire. This irregular basis covered a span of over 30 years. WEll, kinda regular at first then when I started PD work it got irregular.
Bottom line.. no matter how you slice it and dice it... EVERY TIME... is a FIRST TIME when gut check time. I knew cops who had more blood on their guns then Wild Bill Hickock, who almost died because the last one they came up against hit a different cord for some reason. Who knows why? I found when the action was over I was breathing just as fast the last time as I was the first time. You can train for everything but when those rounds are incoming all that past experience can go right out the window if you aren't mentally prepared for it. I am still here because of speed and training with 2 different incidences that were over with before I had time to get ...excited. Something clicked the GO button and reflex took over almost without conscious thought. THAT is what training does. I mean.. who really practices at 100 yards regularly with a handgun? When I was a cop I did.

People talk about prepping and I have made no secret of my great love of "tools" with LEGS because I found that it was much harder for people to kill me if I was out of their range but they were in mine. And who knows what scenario you will face when the balloon goes up and you are sitting there with your favorite .22 as your OPFOR is hiding behind a barricade you can't shoot through with your chosen weapon but a bigger bore could.

I live in the woods and surrounded by forest. It is 3 miles through the trees before the next house out my back door. But, if you look, there are long shooting lanes in the woods, if the bad thing happens can you take advantage of them or are you just a 100 yds shooter because that is pretty much how far you "figure" you will need?

You can prep for pretty much everything but the unknown. Someone said something about needing an imagination.
The other value I have never seen discussed is PATIENCE, and along with that the discipline to NOT MOVE. PATIENCE will keep you alive, movement can get you noticed and get you killed. It is probably one of the hardest things to make part of your life but when things are going weird around you.. sitting and watching and waiting will get you intelligence you might not otherwise get. I learned patience early on because I grew up hunting. It kept me alive in a lot of places.

When I was on my days off from the PD in my 20s I would get to my place up north, camo and face paint up and go out into the woods and just sit, maybe take a book to read and then just remain in the same place for hours the only movement being turning a book page. I had birds land on me, had squirrels and chipmunks run up my legs. Had deer go by close enough to touch.(but don't..really, you do NOT want to reach out and slap a deer's butt as it is walking by you..trust me on this one.)

I see people writing about they BOB or GHB and how they plan to get going and get home as soon as possible... I see no one saying I am going to find a hole and dive in and watch the madness and let it roll by and then move. PATIENCE will save your life if you can have it.


Great post. Probably the best and most sensible one I have ever seen.

I don't plan on moving or evacuating if and when the balloon goes up. I have hiked alone in the wilderness in summer to realize that few people could try to survive in the back country in any season but summer and unexpected weather, falling on sharp sticks, trying to eat the wrong wild food, breaking a limb or running into a bad four-legged predator, could ruin more than you're day.

Most of the folks around me aren't into radical survival, but most store food, hunt, and preserve food from their gardens and from scrounging, so I don't have a lot of fear from them. I have my own gun range of sorts so I practice often, but my age and not-so-good knees has put a damper on refresher tactical courses. Remembering the pressure from the several courses I took just helps me realize what a real gunfight might be like, but I doubt I could ever be ready. Some I talk to say they are, but I am realistic.

I read about folks who think life in a SHTF would be simple, though they know little about trying to live off the land, and will depend on their knowledge from a book. I've had 2 blood clots and almost died twice as I am on a blood thinner until I die. From my extensive study of herbs, I have found no solution to my problem, but I've had a good life and if things go south, I'll last as long as I can and help others. And how I love to walk, especially in the early morning hours, along my trails and stop and gaze at the pine and fir trees.
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Old 08-24-2019, 06:27 PM
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Aerindel Aerindel is offline
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Lot of good posts here, some I will probably come back to.

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I live in the woods and surrounded by forest. It is 3 miles through the trees before the next house out my back door. But, if you look, there are long shooting lanes in the woods, if the bad thing happens can you take advantage of them or are you just a 100 yds shooter because that is pretty much how far you "figure" you will need?
Overall I'm talking philosophy rather than tactics but I want to reply to this because I very much agree with it. I am also in fairly dense woods where in generally 50 yards is about as far as you can see.

But there are many roads, clearcuts, etc in the area where you can get very long sight-lines as well, not to mention, the whole rest of the state which includes a lot of open country. Anyone who has a road to there place probably has 100+ yard sight-lines....on what is also the most likely direction a threat would come from.

And honestly, If I know I'm going to have to shoot something that could be shooting back, I want to be doing that shooting from as far out as I can manage and would be using those sightlines to my advantage.

I really can't think of any outdoor environment where you truly never have long range sight-lines. And while it starts getting expensive and hard to shoot and train past about 500 yards....500 yards is still a good long way and the equipment and skill to shoot that far is not expensive or difficult to acquire. (if you're already into guns)

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. Someone said something about needing an imagination.
Indeed. I think lack of imagination is a big problem in a prepper, and historically, its gotten hundreds of thousands of people killed when its generals and leaders who are lacking in it.

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Given I don't have easy access to ranges beyond 500 meters, and considering my environment doesn't really provide those types of shot-ranges, I also know my personal skill limitations which (for me) concludes that type of distance shooting is not high on my priority list. I'm not discounting it, I'm just not applying the probability, resources, and skill necessary to prioritize it higher, and I don't.
Which is a perfectly rational way to look at it. I've said this once before on this thread but I will say it again because I want to be really clear on it. I'm not telling people to prep for everything or to invest a great deal of effort into unlikely situations.

But what I do hope is that people don't just let themselves put too narrow of brackets on what SHTF could be and become overly specialized.

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Just about all deer hunting in my area is within 100 meters.
Indeed....but...

My first deer was about 350 yards just because that was where it happened to be and that was the only deer I had a tag for that season.
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Old 08-24-2019, 07:07 PM
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Mast3rBlast3r Mast3rBlast3r is offline
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I had a frustrating conversation with a coworker once about shtf. I told him unless the situation demanded it, I planned on bugging in. I planned on moving somewhere less populated, connect with other peppers, start a homestead, and try to be as self sufficient as I could. I have a large family and I know I dont have the skills to provide for my family off the land.

He said when the shtf he would just grab his family and head out into the Kisatchie national forest and live off the land. He said all he would need is a pellet gun because it is quiet, and he could harvest game without drawing attention. I asked him if taking his family out in the wilderness with no supplies and no training a good idea. Did he really think it would be that easy? Was he really that sure he could provide enough food for his family out in the wild for an extended period of time? What if he ended up in a situation where he needed more than a pellet gun? How would he purify water? What if his kid got sick? What would he do on the winter? Louisiana might not be as cold as other places, but many people who die of hypothermia do so in moderately cold weather. And lastly, wouldnt a hundred thousand other boneheads have the same idea?

He acted like I was an idiot an just said he grew up hunting and knew how to live off the land. We went back and forth for a little while, but he was a know it all, and further discussion was pointless.
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Old 08-24-2019, 07:21 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mast3rBlast3r View Post
I had a frustrating conversation with a coworker once about shtf. I told him unless the situation demanded it, I planned on bugging in. I planned on moving somewhere less populated, connect with other peppers, start a homestead, and try to be as self sufficient as I could. I have a large family and I know I dont have the skills to provide for my family off the land.

He said when the shtf he would just grab his family and head out into the Kisatchie national forest and live off the land. He said all he would need is a pellet gun because it is quiet, and he could harvest game without drawing attention. I asked him if taking his family out in the wilderness with no supplies and no training a good idea. Did he really think it would be that easy? Was he really that sure he could provide enough food for his family out in the wild for an extended period of time? What if he ended up in a situation where he needed more than a pellet gun? How would he purify water? What if his kid got sick? What would he do on the winter? Louisiana might not be as cold as other places, but many people who die of hypothermia do so in moderately cold weather. And lastly, wouldnt a hundred thousand other boneheads have the same idea?

He acted like I was an idiot an just said he grew up hunting and knew how to live off the land. We went back and forth for a little while, but he was a know it all, and further discussion was pointless.
YOUR BUDDY... is neither a prepper nor a survivalist.
He is a statistic... and unfortunately so will be his family.
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Old 08-24-2019, 07:44 PM
ebjr1967 ebjr1967 is offline
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Decisions, decisions.

Funny thing is that we can toil and toil, trying to cover every possible scenario, only to make a snap decision when the time comes.
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Old 08-24-2019, 08:11 PM
Eagle Scout Survivor Eagle Scout Survivor is offline
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It is all about helping oneself sleep better at night.

If you declare what ever item or skill you currently have is good enough then it is no longer a stress item.

No one likes addmitting they fall short.

As far as the BOB there was the fad a year or two ago about being as light weight as possible. A lot of people took it to the extreme. On the other hand carrying the 100lb pack is just as foolish.
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