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Old 08-18-2019, 04:52 AM
Bearsclaw 73 Bearsclaw 73 is offline
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I would like to see a section of the forum dedicated to everyday survival stories. Like the story of the guy who had engine trouble in a Cirrus SR-22 and went down in the Canadian forest. Cirrus aircraft have parachutes that are attached to the frame of the airplane and are deployed when the engine fails.
The pilot documented the incident and made a comment about adding more survival gear in case he goes down again. I think he was referring to insect repellent for one thing.
I see where the pilot made a youtube video documenting the incident. Youtube video-- Plane Crash and Rescue from the Quebec wilderness.
He says he plans to make follow up videos that might help other pilots survive similar incidents.
I know that a lot of people think that a survival forum should be for only when the SHTF-- end of things as we know it.
But when you escape a serious incident in your life then you will know that you just survived after your SHTF.
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Old 08-18-2019, 09:04 AM
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Here in canada bug spray or bug netting is a must for survival. I remember watching a movie about a guy crashing in the northwest territories... he got sick and delirious from the thousands of mosquito and blackfly bites and would have died without the help of his native american passenger.

The movie is The Snow Walker.

I have property in the bush in southern Ontario... you cannot live there in June/July without something to repel or keep away bugs (blood suckers). I have sustained over one hundred mosquito and blackfly bites in a few hours of bush work... because I did not apply deet thoroughly and/or failed to reapply... I cannot imagine not having any protection... I don't know how deer or bears make it through early summer...

A smokey fire works to keep away blackfly and day time mosquitoes, but it does little to keep away night time mosquitoes, which come out by the hundreds.

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Old 08-18-2019, 09:14 AM
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Here in canada bug spray or bug netting is a must for survival. I remember watching a movie about a guy crashing in the northwest territories... he got sick and delirious from the thousands of mosquito and blackfly bites and would have died without the help of his native american passenger.

The movie is The Snow Walker.

I have property in the bush in southern Ontario... you cannot live there in June/July without something to repel or keep away bugs (blood suckers). I have sustained over one hundred mosquito and blackfly bites in a few hours of bush work... because I did not apply deet thoroughly and/or failed to reapply... I cannot imagine not having any protection... I don't know how deer or bears make it through early summer...

A smokey fire works to keep away blackfly and day time mosquitoes, but it does little to keep away night time mosquitoes, which come out by the hundreds.

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I THINK you are being kind and understated about the bugs

I started my Ontario adventure life when I was like 6 and we spent the summer in Chapleau. That was early 50s and real bush.
then
My folks had a place in Ontario for years and OH BOY, you better slather up with something if you are going into the deep.
and
They didn't come out by the hundreds at night, more like, as Carl Sagen used to say "Billions and billions".
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Old 08-18-2019, 09:43 AM
Outpost75 Outpost75 is offline
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http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn...l?hpid=topnews

Bowie Student Trapped 8 Days Details Pain, Survival Tactics

By Avis Thomas-Lester
Washington Post Staff Writer
Tuesday, September 11, 2007; Page A01

As Julian McCormick recalls it, he lay in and out of consciousness for eight days and seven nights, hot, sticky and bloody with not a clue as to what day it was or how he ended up trapped in his overturned car at the bottom of a steep embankment in Prince George's County.

To survive, he ate a fish he caught with his hands and used his high-top sneaker to drink water from the creek, the 18-year-old Bowie State University student told his parents.

Julian McCormick's wrecked car, lying in a ditch near an overpass of the Baltimore-Washington Parkway in Beltsville. He doesn't recall how the accident happened. (By Al Schwartz -- Beltsville Volunteer Fire Department)

Julian McCormick was found alive Saturday near a creek his car had flipped into. McCormick disappeared Sept. 1.

When he finally was able to muster the strength, he cut his seat belt using a small knife he had in his car, forced his door open and then dragged himself by his elbows, his body racked with pain, 30 feet up to the shoulder of the road hoping that someone would see him and rescue him. Someone did.

"We've got him back, and we are so glad!" his ecstatic mother said yesterday in an interview. "He's doing great."

As their son recovered at Washington Hospital Center yesterday, Peggy and James McCormick tried to piece together the circumstances of their son's disappearance and recovery and questioned why police had not done more to search for him. They said doctors have told them that their son's injuries are consistent with someone who had been exposed to the elements for days without food or water.

But what had happened to the Laurel teenager? Why did his Honda Civic leave the roadway and land in a creek bed that runs under the road where he was found, near the Beltsville Agricultural Research Center? And why did police wait days to look for McCormick and then conduct just a 1 1/2 -hour search -- at night, when visibility was limited?

Sgt. Robert Lachance of the U.S. Park Police, which is investigating the accident because it occurred on federal land, said investigators were waiting to interview McCormick, who was sedated yesterday. He was in fair condition and being treated for malnutrition, dehydration, abrasions and an injured hip.

"We really don't want to ask him too much about what happened," James McCormick said. "The doctors predict that he will be 100 percent healed. . . . We're just trying to be there for him."

Mark Brady, a spokesman for Prince George's County fire and rescue, said McCormick's injuries were similar to those of a person who had been trapped in a car.

The McCormicks reported their son missing Sept. 1, a few hours after he left a band practice at Bowie State on his way to the University of Maryland at College Park, where he was meeting his girlfriend but never showed.

His parents and friends posted fliers and searched for him around Bowie State. His girlfriend, Flor Orellana-Diaz, called his cellphone 127 times.

Police categorized McCormick as a "non-critical missing person" because there were no signs of foul play.

They conducted an aerial search for him Friday night from 9 to 10:30 -- well after dark, according to the helicopter squad's aviation log. He was discovered by a motorist Saturday evening.

"I don't think it was a priority," Peggy McCormick said.

Julian McCormick's wrecked car, lying in a ditch near an overpass of the Baltimore-Washington Parkway in Beltsville. He doesn't recall how the accident happened. (By Al Schwartz -- Beltsville Volunteer Fire Department)

Added James McCormick: "He's been there the whole time, less than one mile from home."

According to his parents, Julian McCormick was on Powder Mill Road near the on-ramp to the Baltimore-Washington Parkway when he lost control of his car. It ran off the road and down the steep ravine.

He told his parents that he was not sure how long he was unconscious in the car. He woke to find his seat belt strapped across his chest and his breathing labored. After he cut the seat belt, his parents said, he waited to be rescued. James McCormick said it took more than a week for his son to get his driver's-side door open and get out. The McCormicks said their son was able to keep time on his watch, but the days got away from him and he could not use his cellphone because its battery was dead. The McCormicks also said their son does not recall how the accident occurred.

Julian McCormick told them the car was upside down in the ravine and that at first, he couldn't get out.

His mother said he told her that he was able to get to the creek for some water.

"He told me, 'Thank God for these size 13 shoes, Mom, because I was able to drink out of them.' "

Her son managed to tell her that he was very hungry so he grabbed a fish and ate it. He felt he needed to eat to survive, his mother said.

"He said: 'Mom, I just knew I had to see you again. Mom, I was so afraid that I was going to die,' " she recounted.

It wasn't until days after he landed in the ravine, Peggy McCormick said, that her son was able to drag himself up to the road. He doesn't know how long it took to climb the 30-foot embankment. His timing was good, though: Just before 6 p.m. Saturday, Leigh Ann Hess, who was riding in a car with her mother, noticed the soaking wet and muddy teenager lying on the side of the road, wiggling his fingers in an attempt to flag down help.

She jumped out to help him, and about a half-dozen other drivers eventually stopped. Rescue workers arrived within minutes. He was able to give his name and address but didn't know what day it was.

McCormick's survival story, remarkable as it is, is similar to others told across the country: the 83-year-old Florida woman who survived three days while her car was suspended in mangrove trees in a swamp, an elderly San Jose couple who were in a steep ravine for four days before they were rescued.

Doctors say survival depends on many factors, including age, the weather and access to water. People react to dehydration differently, depending on their health and physical condition, and usually they can survive days, even weeks, without food, said Eric Glasser, assistant chief of service for the emergency department at Georgetown University Hospital.

Family members said yesterday that they did not know when Julian McCormick would be released from the hospital.

"He's got no breaks or fractures, no internal injuries," his mother said. "If something had happened and he'd had internal injuries, they would have found the car, but he would have been gone. God was with him."

Staff writer Jenna Johnson and staff researcher Meg Smith contributed to this report.

-----------------------------------------------------
The Associated Press
Friday, September 28, 2007; 2:45 AM

MAPLE VALLEY, Wash. -- A woman who had been missing for eight days was found alive Thursday in her car at the bottom of a steep ravine after searchers traced a signal from her cell phone.

Tanya Rider, 33, responded to her name when her car was found along a highway in suburban Seattle, State Patrol Sgt. Dave Divis said.

King County sheriff's investigators used a cell phone signal to recheck a segment of the highway, State Patrol spokesman Jeff Merrill said. On Thursday afternoon, they noticed some matted brush, and below it they found her Honda Element, smashed on its side.

"She looks very pale, very dehydrated. She didn't have a lot of cuts but had difficulty breathing," Merrill said.

Rider was taken to Harborview Medical Center, where she was in critical condition, hospital spokeswoman Susan Gregg-Hanson said. Her husband, Tom Rider, said she was "fighting for her life," suffering from kidney failure and sores from lying in the same position for a week.

Tanya Rider, of Maple Valley, was last seen Sept. 19 after leaving her shift at a Fred Meyer grocery store in Bellevue.

Her car tumbled about 20 feet down the ravine and lay buried below heavy brush and blackberry bushes. Rescuers had to cut the roof off to get her out.

Tom Rider said he was sitting down to take a lie-detector test at the sheriff's office so officers could exclude him as a suspect in his wife's disappearance when officers told him the car had been found.

"I wanted to make sure they weren't focusing on me, that they were focusing on Tanya," he said.

Tom Rider had offered a $25,000 reward for any information leading to his wife's return.

2007 The Associated Press

More Stories of Survival:

2005: A 58-year-old Hawaii woman survived five days after she slid down a 600-foot hillside along the Hau'ula Trail and fell 25 feet into a stream. She had no serious injuries.

2001: A San Jose couple survived four days after their car plunged more than 100 feet into a ravine. The woman, age 79, was legally blind, and her husband, 81, was blind in one eye and a lung cancer patient.

2000: An 83-year-old Fort Lauderdale woman survived three days in a car suspended in mangrove trees over a snake-infested swamp. She drank rainwater and ate a cough drop, peppermint candy and chewing gum.

1997: A 41-year-old Connecticut woman survived for nearly two days after her car crashed into a ravine. To draw rescuers' attention, she set some of her clothes on fire.

1994: A 25-year-old Texas woman with several broken bones survived 2 1/2 days pinned inside her pickup after crashing into a wooded ravine. She used a folded Victoria's Secret catalogue as a funnel to catch rainwater.
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Old 08-18-2019, 09:51 AM
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I THINK you are being kind and understated about the bugs



I started my Ontario adventure life when I was like 6 and we spent the summer in Chapleau. That was early 50s and real bush.

then

My folks had a place in Ontario for years and OH BOY, you better slather up with something if you are going into the deep.

and

They didn't come out by the hundreds at night, more like, as Carl Sagen used to say "Billions and billions".
I've worked in Wawa and visited Chapleau... yeap, the skeeters are like Carl Sagan's description: by the billions. Just like the trillions of snowflakes one gets in winter!

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Old 08-25-2019, 01:49 PM
Idaho Survivalist Idaho Survivalist is offline
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Some people might be in what they called a survival situation but others were there and saw no problems. I think a lot of it has to do with experience. In the 60's as a 19-year old college student, I got the opportunity to spend two weeks a a commercial trolling boat 50 miles off the coast of Alaska. My job was to clean the salmon or halibut coming aboard the 44-foot troller, and then take them to the hold where I would ice them down. I came up from the hold once and the skipper said to finish the cleaning and icing because we were heading to port (actually just a big bay because there were almost no ports along the Gulf of Alaska. I asked why because the ocean was so calm except for the rolling seas. I was told that as soon as the breeze stopped we had to go. I iced down the fish and when I got on deck the wind was blowing and there was a bit of a chop on the sea. Within 30 minutes the wind was at about 60 knots, a gale.

The trolling poles were dropped to almost level with the water and at the end of each of two poles was a stabilizer of fairly heavy weight. We had a lot of weight from ice in the hold. As instructed I had tied everything, including the 300-pound trap weights usually used for everyday steadying the boat. Inside the cabin, I jammed screwdrivers into the galley window that slid up and down for ventilation.

The skipper sat on a sort of connected stool and steered the boat. I couldn't sit at the galley table because I would keep getting tossed around. No seatbelts on a fishing boat. The waves would slop clear over the top of the cabin and I had by then lost the seasickness I had had for the previous 10 days and replaced that with fear. I was scared and I had grown up around the ocean. Finally we got to Lituya Bay. The skipper seem to have had no fear but then he had a lot of experience. I later heard of many stories in such weather when the entire cabin was take off. Over the course of 7 summers I would have several such stories.
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