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Old 03-19-2016, 10:56 AM
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So this week I had a major score. I found 5 patches of wild onions all within 2 miles of my BOL. All in all I would estimate around 3/4 to one acre of onions total. Anyone have any experience with these?
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Old 03-19-2016, 11:07 AM
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My great grandmother planted a patch of wild onions back in the early 1900s and they're still going strong. They don't grow very big - the biggest I've picked being about the size of a quarter - but they make up for it in flavor. We don't have enough to use on a regular basis so I haven't really done much other than dice them up and throw them in a potato soup or something.
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Old 03-19-2016, 11:21 AM
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Field Garlic:


Around here the fields are full of it. When the farm ground looks like it's turning green, it's the garlic that is coming up. Almost looks like pasture grass coming up.
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Old 03-19-2016, 11:22 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by KHos View Post
So this week I had a major score. I found 5 patches of wild onions all within 2 miles of my BOL. All in all I would estimate around 3/4 to one acre of onions total. Anyone have any experience with these?
Are they actually onions or are they leeks AKS ramps? Just curious. We had over a full acre of them deep in our woods that we'd pick every Spring. We dug a bunch up last year and transplanted to our new place in northern Michigan. We have no idea if they will take, or not. Allium tricoccum is what we have.
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Old 03-19-2016, 11:30 AM
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Where I live, we get a good amount of "Ramps" in the spring.

It can be an acquired taste, some people like em and some don't.

My favorite way to eat them is this way:

EGGS AND RAMPS

Wash ramps well (as you do for leeks)
Fry up your bacon till crisp, set bacon aside.
Add large pat of butter in bacon grease and add cleaned ramps (no need to chop)
Cook ramps until well wilted, set on plate with your bacon.
Drain most of the grease from pan and cook your eggs.
Once eggs are done, set them either on the side or on top of the ramp. I personally like them on top.

Mighty fine eating.
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Old 03-19-2016, 11:43 AM
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Around here they are called wild onions or field garlic or wild garlic. I know these aren't leeks or ramps. They are all about the size of a quarter or so and have a very strong onion smell to them.
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Old 03-19-2016, 11:49 AM
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I have transplanted in both wild onions and garlic chives.

I tend to chop up both the root and the "green onion" and add to soups snd stews.
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Old 03-19-2016, 11:57 AM
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There's a few wild chives in my back yard but not near enough to harvest regularly. These onions however.... I don't think I could ever eat them all
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Old 03-19-2016, 12:00 PM
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In the area where I live there is a creek that runs through the subdivision and into a flood control reservoir. On my past walks up and down the creek, I have spotted wild onion. For some reason this year however, they are really noticeable. Rains must have come at just the right time.

On my walk down the creek this year, there were patches over about a quarter to half mile. Another section has wild carrot, not quite a quarter mile. And all up and down the creek is curled dock.
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Old 03-19-2016, 12:04 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by KHos View Post
Around here they are called wild onions or field garlic or wild garlic. I know these aren't leeks or ramps. They are all about the size of a quarter or so and have a very strong onion smell to them.
Our wild leeks AKA ramps also have a strong onion smell and are the size of a quarter. These come up in the early Spring in our woods where moderate sunlight comes in (central NY). Leaves die and disappear by early summer. In NJ, we used to have wild scallions that grew all summer and were larger.

Here are some photos taken in early May of Eastern Leeks in NY.
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Old 03-19-2016, 12:09 PM
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These aren't leeks they looks exactly like creek walker's picture above.
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Old 03-19-2016, 12:23 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by KHos View Post
These aren't leeks they looks exactly like creek walker's picture above.
If you are referring to the photos I posted, they are indeed eastern leeks.
Technical name is "Allium tricoccum."
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Old 03-19-2016, 12:50 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Creek Walker View Post
Field Garlic:


Around here the fields are full of it. When the farm ground looks like it's turning green, it's the garlic that is coming up. Almost looks like pasture grass coming up.
I was referring to this photo posted by creek walker. Hence I said they look like creek walker's photo above.
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Old 03-19-2016, 12:55 PM
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Tall pencil thin leaves, round and hollow in the middle-- onions.
Shorter leaves, flat and a little wide but not round and hollow-- ramps or leeks.
Tall pencil thin leaves, flat and not hollow, no bulb-- chives.
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Old 03-19-2016, 01:28 PM
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I gathered a bunch of wild onions last year. Chopped them up, dehydrated them and been using them all year in different dishes.
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Old 03-19-2016, 09:34 PM
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If they are growing wild then consider some companion planting to see if they will set and thrive wild together.

Carrots, parsnips, salsify, celeriac, turnips, beets, and burdock all grow well beside the wild onion family and the the various wild onions and ramps will deter pests that go after these food plants. The smell deters insects and foraging animals from the area.

If you can get one more root veggie from the above list to take hold wild there then you have a pretty decent nutrition combo going that won't need to be tended or be found in a garden by thieves.

A bit of useful guerilla gardening that already has part of the work done for you already.
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Old 03-19-2016, 10:33 PM
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I'll be sure to try that! I'm thinking carrots, then all is have to do is shoot or trap a rabbit and I got the start of a great stew!
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Old 03-19-2016, 10:37 PM
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Default Create your own wild onion patches

A prep that anyone can do is to plant some onions in a place that they will or might bug out to in a SHTF situation. They will come back year after year if they are left to grow and not interfered with. I come from a rural area and there are wild onion patches close to some abandoned farms and farmhouses.

I have wondered about planting some other vegetables to see if they will become wild. Maybe carrots, parsnips, and other root vegetables. In my experience of growing potatoes, every year, when I think I have them all dug up, I must leave some behind because they too will come back.

I also think it would be good to have more than one patch. Buy some starts in the spring, take a trowel or shovel out and plant your patches. Someone else may come across your patches and may harvest some, but a bag of 200 onion starts would certainly be a great resource to have planted in a place where you could potentially harvest them.
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Old 03-20-2016, 07:43 AM
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Recently I cooked my wife some wild rabbit with wild onions, mashed potatoes, gravy and biscuits. We had a bottle of red wine to go with it. A meal fit for a king. My mom used to cook them with eggs.
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Old 03-20-2016, 08:08 AM
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As has probably been said elsewhere, there are kinds of plants that look a lot like onions that are mildly to very toxic. The big clue is the smell. If they smell like onions or garlic, that's probably what they are. If they smell musty or don't smell at all, better find out what they are before making a pot of "onion" soup...
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