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Old 04-16-2014, 10:33 PM
LindaLou LindaLou is offline
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Any ideas best way to store the herbs that I'm starting to pick?

Rosemary, garlic chives, cilantro, basil, flat leaf parsley, bay leaf.
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Old 04-16-2014, 11:26 PM
Mels thinkingitover Mels thinkingitover is offline
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I leave my herbs in the largest pieces possible, dehydrate them and store them in canning jars with O2 absorbers (for the ones I am storing beyond a few months) and keep the jars in the dark.

I grind them or powder them just a couple of months worth at a time, leaving the herbs in the largest pieces possible until then. The larger the piece the longer it lasts with the maximum amount of flavor.
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Old 04-16-2014, 11:26 PM
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Any ideas best way to store the herbs that I'm starting to pick?

Rosemary, garlic chives, cilantro, basil, flat leaf parsley, bay leaf.
I'd just run 'em through the dehydrator, but I'm no expert.
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Old 04-16-2014, 11:32 PM
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Dehydrate at a lower temperature for a longer period of time for long term storage. Dehydrating too fast/hot can cause the outside to dry but leave a kernel of moisture in the center of the food which will cause it to ruin in storage.
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Old 04-16-2014, 11:36 PM
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We're harvesting asparagus and storing it in our tummies

I've got to put up some oregano, too!
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Old 04-16-2014, 11:42 PM
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We're harvesting asparagus and storing it in our tummies

I've got to put up some oregano, too!
That's the way we're storing our strawberries this year. It's a first year patch so there's not enough coming in for any big harvest anyway but so far there hasn't been a ripe strawberry sleep in the house overnight. Every one of them are eaten the day they are picked.

Are you raising your oregano? Have you planted it yet? I asked because there is an oregano (I doubt it is heirloom) that is a hot and spicy oregano. It is the best tasting stuff. I had one plant to try it last year but am searching for more of that one this year.
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Old 04-16-2014, 11:53 PM
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Are you raising your oregano? Have you planted it yet? I asked because there is an oregano (I doubt it is heirloom) that is a hot and spicy oregano. It is the best tasting stuff. I had one plant to try it last year but am searching for more of that one this year.
It's a Greek oregano plant that I planted about 4 years ago right next to my kitchen door. I'll usually just step out and pick some leaves for my Italian & Mexican dishes. However during the summer it blooms and after that the leaves don't look too appetizing, so this year I really should "make hay while the sun shines" and dry some.
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Old 04-17-2014, 09:44 AM
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We're harvesting asparagus and storing it in our tummies

I've got to put up some oregano, too!
Lucky you!

We used to have wild perennial asparagus and rhubarb when we lived in Michigan.

It doesn't do so well here in the south for me without a lot of attention.

But, now I have citrus, which I didn't have in Michigan so I guess it's a pretty good trade-off!
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Old 04-17-2014, 10:35 AM
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i will see your fire ants and raise you biting face flies...


No harvesting anything here yet, just planted most of my cool weather crops this weekend, still have some more to plant this week and weekend. Much of the cool weather crops will be ready to harvest by early may and early june....

As for my root crops, i am going to try a new storage method this year, i have been thinking about it for 4 years now and am ready to try it. I am going to put together a small 10x10 building or so and build three bins in it to put the roots into, as i put the roots in i will put in peat moss with them and fill them up with 50% roots 50% peat. My thought is that they are designed to naturally overwinter in the soil, going along with the natural design of the root may make for better easier storage.





this will be our first full gardening run since we sold the last farm and bought this one, i am a bit jazzed.... I might be going a bit over board, but then that is why lil brother nicknamed me "maximum overkill" i guess...
what type of tiller is this in this picture?? I am stuck between a honda and a troy built right now.
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Old 04-17-2014, 10:45 AM
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It is a Baretto, has hydraulic drive and till and a 10 horse Honda engine on it. A very nice tiller, I picked this up used from a local rental store, it is a very powerfull tiller.
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Old 04-17-2014, 11:55 AM
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We're finishing up harvesting from our Winter garden( Spinach, Kale, Arugula, Chard and Broccoli).


Then, I have the 1st growing season( Spring/early Summer) crops in the ground- peppers, tomatoes, beans, corn and melons.
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Old 04-19-2014, 08:37 PM
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Radishes and dewberries will be ready to pick by weeks end.

Radishes to be pickled and dewberries to be devoured IMMEDIATELY - at least, how ever many I can snag before the birds and DH get them.

Woo-hoo !
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Old 05-06-2014, 08:00 PM
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Dewberries are coming in! This is just the beginning!

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Sorry the pic is so small; this is my first attempt to post an image. Just click on image to enlarge it.
Suggestions appreciated!
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Old 05-06-2014, 09:56 PM
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We should be harvesting our first radishes in about 2 to 3 weeks....... we will harvest about 3,000 to eat as radishes, then we let the other 7k of them go to seed, of which we will harvest about half the seed pods when they are tender and green to eat. The rest will be seed for this fall, winter and next year...

I was reading an article a few years back about radish seed pods being a favorite bar snack in Germany so I tried it out, wow they are great, tender, crispy and spicy. The real beauty of it is that you can gather a basket full of these things from each plant rater than just a single radish, and you harvest later on in the summer when radishes don't grow so well.

If you try letting radishes go to seed, be forwarned that they actually become very large, around four to five feet tall and around 2 to 3 feet wide. I was picking up 300 to 400 seed pods off each plant last time I did this, the seed pods are about 2 to 3 inches long and about 1/4 to 3/8 inches diameter.
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Old 05-06-2014, 10:13 PM
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We should be harvesting our first radishes in about 2 to 3 weeks....... we will harvest about 3,000 to eat as radishes, then we let the other 7k of them go to seed, of which we will harvest about half the seed pods when they are tender and green to eat. The rest will be seed for this fall, winter and next year...

I was reading an article a few years back about radish seed pods being a favorite bar snack in Germany so I tried it out, wow they are great, tender, crispy and spicy. The real beauty of it is that you can gather a basket full of these things from each plant rater than just a single radish, and you harvest later on in the summer when radishes don't grow so well.

If you try letting radishes go to seed, be forwarned that they actually become very large, around four to five feet tall and around 2 to 3 feet wide. I was picking up 300 to 400 seed pods off each plant last time I did this, the seed pods are about 2 to 3 inches long and about 1/4 to 3/8 inches diameter.
Very interesting. I really have to let a radish grow to it's full potential this year. I wonder if you can cook the pods? They sound like green beans.
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Old 05-06-2014, 10:50 PM
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Here is a link to an article about using the radish seed pods as a food...

http://www.ruralintelligence.com/ind..._spicy_secret/

And this is what they look like on the plants...



I am hoping to get enough to sell some to the local stores here in Deary and Troy, it is something unusual but should be popular and no one else does it....

Here is another link about this, apparently this is a common food in India....

http://www.tarladalal.com/glossary-radish-pods-1813i
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Old 05-06-2014, 10:54 PM
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Originally Posted by Mountain View Post
Here is a link to an article about using the radish seed pods as a food...

http://www.ruralintelligence.com/ind..._spicy_secret/

And this is what they look like on the plants...



I am hoping to get enough to sell some to the local stores here in Deary and Troy, it is something unusual but should be popular and no one else does it....

Here is another link about this, apparently this is a common food in India....

http://www.tarladalal.com/glossary-radish-pods-1813i
They look like Serrano peppers. I learn something new everyday I bet they're good cooked with potatoes... or raw like you had them
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Old 05-06-2014, 11:08 PM
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Mountain, you and your family eat 3000 radishes?
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Old 05-07-2014, 01:20 AM
LindaLou LindaLou is offline
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Originally Posted by Mountain View Post
We should be harvesting our first radishes in about 2 to 3 weeks....... we will harvest about 3,000 to eat as radishes, then we let the other 7k of them go to seed, of which we will harvest about half the seed pods when they are tender and green to eat. The rest will be seed for this fall, winter and next year...

I was reading an article a few years back about radish seed pods being a favorite bar snack in Germany so I tried it out, wow they are great, tender, crispy and spicy.
Mountain, very interesting use of radishes and helpful links. Do you eat the radishes and pods fresh only or do you store / preserve them in some way? I will try to let some of my radishes go to seed this year, if they survive the summer heat. Have you grown Daikon radishes? I'm thinking of trying them this autumn.
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Old 05-07-2014, 09:34 AM
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Still harvesting the hardy greens (collards, kale, wong bok, chard, etc....) for fresh eating. They came through the winter nicely without protection, just set them back about 2-4 weeks from their active growth period.

The cilantro, mint, winter savory, and rosemary are all putting on strong new growth. Onions and leeks overwintered well, too.

I made a "fresh" batch of salsa yesterday with fresh picked cilantro and green onions combined with tomato and green chili from last season.

It sure would be nice to get the cilantro and tomato season to overlap better!
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