MRE Style Pouch Canning - Survivalist Forum
Survivalist Forum

Advertise Here

Go Back   Survivalist Forum > >
Articles Classifieds Donations Gallery Groups Links Store Survival Files


Notices

Disaster Preparedness General Discussion Anything Disaster Preparedness or Survival Related

Advertise Here
Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
New to Canning-Canning Deli Meats? PA_Robert Food and water 13 11-08-2016 05:26 PM
Pressure Canning/Canning Meat MC Ain't Crazy Food and water 19 02-21-2016 01:44 PM
Mosin Nagant Cleaning Kit Canvas pouch (pouch only) Cope's Distribuitng Cope's Distributing 0 03-31-2014 03:21 PM
Difference between commercial canning and home canning ?? weeblessings4 Food and water 17 10-09-2013 11:42 AM
Canning for beginners: small-batch canning BrowserCat Food and water 9 11-03-2012 11:39 AM
Campfire Canning Proenekke Style britzen Disaster Preparedness General Discussion 9 10-12-2012 08:17 PM
$10 for a Military Style Flap Holster for Square Trigger Guard with Extra Mag Pouch GearHog GearHog 0 02-16-2012 02:00 AM
DIY Lavvu, Laavu, or other tent, tipi style or wall style. fhowk DIY - Do It Yourself 2 08-21-2010 02:27 PM
American style canning jars in the UK Half-Crown British Isles and ROI 5 04-15-2009 12:49 PM
Homemade Dump Pouch (Rolypoly Style) Josiah922 Wilderness Survival, Hiking and Camping Forum 11 04-01-2008 10:35 PM

Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
Old 09-05-2010, 08:19 AM
AF-Jay's Avatar
AF-Jay AF-Jay is offline
two shots from freedom
 
Join Date: Sep 2010
Location: Chicago Area
Posts: 15
Thanks: 4
Thanked 19 Times in 8 Posts
Default MRE Style Pouch Canning



Advertise Here

Hi all this is my first thread.

I was wondering if anyone has ever tried to can their own food in pouches similar to what you see with tuna bags and MRE entries. This whole idea came about when I ran into this site. The official name for those bags are retort pouches. However, the cost of that vacuum sealer is over $1000. Right now I'm planing on trying this out by placing the retort pouch inside of a standard vacuum pouch and using a normal house hold vacuum sealer to remove the air. Then I can just use an iron to seal the retort pouch while its inside of the standard pouch. After that I should just be able to strip away the standard bag and proceed with pressure canning as normal.
Quick reply to this message
Old 09-05-2010, 01:06 PM
MikeK's Avatar
MikeK MikeK is offline
Walking methane refinery
 
Join Date: Jul 2009
Location: Texas
Age: 56
Posts: 63,940
Thanks: 129,389
Thanked 152,741 Times in 44,507 Posts
Awards Showcase
Outstanding Member 
Total Awards: 1
Default

I would think it would require too much specialized equipment and precision. If there's no power, heat sealers won't work, etc. Canning in glass jars is simple and primitive. It can even be done over a wood or charcoal fire. And the jars being reusable are another plus. It's a lot more sustainable over the years, especially with the advent of reuseable lids.

Welcome to the forum, and let us know what you learn about homemade MREs.
Quick reply to this message
The Following 9 Users Say Thank You to MikeK For This Useful Post:
Old 09-05-2010, 08:21 PM
chipmunk chipmunk is offline
Prepared
 
Join Date: Oct 2009
Location: Chicago burbs
Posts: 395
Thanks: 355
Thanked 410 Times in 141 Posts
Default

welcome! to the forums
Quick reply to this message
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
Old 09-05-2010, 08:37 PM
The Saint's Avatar
The Saint The Saint is offline
Christian
 
Join Date: Sep 2009
Location: NORTH Western Michigan
Posts: 39,501
Thanks: 37,450
Thanked 50,611 Times in 21,632 Posts
Awards Showcase
Top Poster 
Total Awards: 1
Default

I have a food saver, I love it, but the issue is I cannot "can" anything with it. The process requires heat and a vaccume, this can only be obtained with glass canning jars or specialized bag equipment.

As for making your own MRE's this is doable I have resorted to buying tuna or spam in the foil pouches and adding my own extra stuff in a 1 gal food saver bag.

You can get 2 gallon ones also.



Quick reply to this message
The Following User Says Thank You to The Saint For This Useful Post:
Old 09-05-2010, 08:50 PM
danger's Avatar
danger danger is offline
Trapper
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Location: Southern Michigan
Posts: 781
Thanks: 256
Thanked 718 Times in 348 Posts
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by The Saint View Post
I have a food saver, I love it, but the issue is I cannot "can" anything with it. The process requires heat and a vaccume, this can only be obtained with glass canning jars or specialized bag equipment.

As for making your own MRE's this is doable I have resorted to buying tuna or spam in the foil pouches and adding my own extra stuff in a 1 gal food saver bag.

You can get 2 gallon ones also.
Canning requires heat. The seal and the cooling process create the vacuum. Canning meat or low-acid foods requires a pressure canner. At least if you want to do it safely.

Let me know if you run out of foodsaver bags. I bought a truck load of the rolls and don't use it as often as I thought I would.
Quick reply to this message
The Following 3 Users Say Thank You to danger For This Useful Post:
Old 09-05-2010, 08:54 PM
The Saint's Avatar
The Saint The Saint is offline
Christian
 
Join Date: Sep 2009
Location: NORTH Western Michigan
Posts: 39,501
Thanks: 37,450
Thanked 50,611 Times in 21,632 Posts
Awards Showcase
Top Poster 
Total Awards: 1
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by danger View Post
Canning requires heat. The seal and the cooling process create the vacuum. Canning meat or low-acid foods requires a pressure canner. At least if you want to do it safely.

Let me know if you run out of foodsaver bags. I bought a truck load of the rolls and don't use it as often as I thought I would.
Thanks for the offer. I went to Menard's and bought a boatload of the generic ones they are thicker. I love Menard's!

We picked up an American canner this year I'm going for canning meats, until now it was either smoked or frozen.



Quick reply to this message
Old 09-05-2010, 09:14 PM
danger's Avatar
danger danger is offline
Trapper
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Location: Southern Michigan
Posts: 781
Thanks: 256
Thanked 718 Times in 348 Posts
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by The Saint View Post
Thanks for the offer. I went to Menard's and bought a boatload of the generic ones they are thicker. I love Menard's!

We picked up an American canner this year I'm going for canning meats, until now it was either smoked or frozen.
Which model did you get? I thought the 921 would be large enough, but we end up making huge batches of stuff, so I recently bought the 930. I can pressure can up to 21 quart jars at a time now!
Quick reply to this message
Old 09-06-2010, 10:00 AM
homesteader1's Avatar
homesteader1 homesteader1 is offline
Free Mason
 
Join Date: Sep 2009
Location: Spartanburg County South Carolina
Age: 68
Posts: 1,100
Thanks: 1,333
Thanked 944 Times in 501 Posts
Default

I have not studied the process of bagged tuna. It is not vacuumed otherwise the bag would be sucked in hard like the bricks of coffee. I think the tuna is placed inside the Mylar bag and then Irritated to kill all the bacteria. The process does not require heat.
Quick reply to this message
Old 09-06-2010, 10:25 AM
Gallo Pazzesco's Avatar
Gallo Pazzesco Gallo Pazzesco is offline
Geronimo!
 
Join Date: Mar 2010
Location: Palmetto State
Posts: 4,053
Thanks: 5,529
Thanked 7,190 Times in 2,081 Posts
Default

The beauty, I would think (and I've always wanted one) of using retort canners is both the space they save and their durability (in terms of being basically unbreakable). In addition, there is the argument that they protect from UV affects as well.

You'd have to do some pretty good quantity to make that rig pay for itself. Running it off of a generator would probably not be out of the question, although, in a total post shtf scenario, jars would be far more practical. But for everyday prepping pre shtf, it looks like a pretty neat idea. They have finally made them more affordable. When I first started looking at those the only ones available were commercial grade and ten times more expensive than these.
Quick reply to this message
The Following User Says Thank You to Gallo Pazzesco For This Useful Post:
Old 09-06-2010, 11:54 AM
TheTexasHammer's Avatar
TheTexasHammer TheTexasHammer is offline
Mall ninja in training
 
Join Date: May 2009
Posts: 461
Thanks: 490
Thanked 456 Times in 208 Posts
Default

I have not used anything like this before. I would like to go buy one. Am I correct in assuming that if I get one, that I all I really need to do is have the vacuum sealer and some bags, and when I seal up some stuff, all I would have to do is boil it to sterilize and then I'm good to go. It that right?
Quick reply to this message
Old 09-06-2010, 12:19 PM
danger's Avatar
danger danger is offline
Trapper
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Location: Southern Michigan
Posts: 781
Thanks: 256
Thanked 718 Times in 348 Posts
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by TheTexasHammer View Post
I have not used anything like this before. I would like to go buy one. Am I correct in assuming that if I get one, that I all I really need to do is have the vacuum sealer and some bags, and when I seal up some stuff, all I would have to do is boil it to sterilize and then I'm good to go. It that right?
He uses a pressure canner in the videos. Even though it is a pouch, you still need the higher temperature that only a pressure canner will achieve. If by boiling you mean a hot water bath, then that isn't enough.

Last edited by danger; 09-06-2010 at 12:29 PM.. Reason: I was wrong about the vacuum type, comment removed.
Quick reply to this message
The Following User Says Thank You to danger For This Useful Post:
Old 09-06-2010, 12:21 PM
TheTexasHammer's Avatar
TheTexasHammer TheTexasHammer is offline
Mall ninja in training
 
Join Date: May 2009
Posts: 461
Thanks: 490
Thanked 456 Times in 208 Posts
Default

I'm not spending the money on an industrial sized one. I went and looked at Wally World and they have one for around $50. Are you sure hot water bath isn't enough?

My issue is that the jars used in canning are much more expensive that some cheap plastic bags would be.
Quick reply to this message
Old 09-06-2010, 12:34 PM
danger's Avatar
danger danger is offline
Trapper
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Location: Southern Michigan
Posts: 781
Thanks: 256
Thanked 718 Times in 348 Posts
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by TheTexasHammer View Post
I'm not spending the money on an industrial sized one. I went and looked at Wally World and they have one for around $50. Are you sure hot water bath isn't enough?

My issue is that the jars used in canning are much more expensive that some cheap plastic bags would be.
Hot water bath isn't enough for meats or low-acidic foods. You need to pressure can those at a higher temperature.

I'm not sure foodsaver type plastic bags would survive a hot water bath, and I'm certain they wouldn't survive the pressure canner process.
Quick reply to this message
Old 09-06-2010, 01:05 PM
MikeK's Avatar
MikeK MikeK is offline
Walking methane refinery
 
Join Date: Jul 2009
Location: Texas
Age: 56
Posts: 63,940
Thanks: 129,389
Thanked 152,741 Times in 44,507 Posts
Awards Showcase
Outstanding Member 
Total Awards: 1
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by TheTexasHammer View Post
I'm not spending the money on an industrial sized one. I went and looked at Wally World and they have one for around $50. Are you sure hot water bath isn't enough?

My issue is that the jars used in canning are much more expensive that some cheap plastic bags would be.
It can't be cheap plastic bags. They have to be designed for the task. For example, vacuum sealer bags almost always develop a leak over time. Air leaking in means bacteria leaking in.

And any low acid foods being heat preserved, need the high heat that a pressure canner produces. If it's not safe to hot water bath can in a jar, then it wouldn't be safe in a bag either. They both share the same safety concerns.
Quick reply to this message
The Following 4 Users Say Thank You to MikeK For This Useful Post:
Old 09-06-2010, 01:09 PM
danger's Avatar
danger danger is offline
Trapper
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Location: Southern Michigan
Posts: 781
Thanks: 256
Thanked 718 Times in 348 Posts
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by AF-Jay View Post
Hi all this is my first thread.

I was wondering if anyone has ever tried to can their own food in pouches similar to what you see with tuna bags and MRE entries. This whole idea came about when I ran into this site. The official name for those bags are retort pouches. However, the cost of that vacuum sealer is over $1000. Right now I'm planing on trying this out by placing the retort pouch inside of a standard vacuum pouch and using a normal house hold vacuum sealer to remove the air. Then I can just use an iron to seal the retort pouch while its inside of the standard pouch. After that I should just be able to strip away the standard bag and proceed with pressure canning as normal.
Please let us know how your experiment works out. I got to thinking about how nice it would be to have some homemade non-breakable packages of meals ready to eat.
Quick reply to this message
Old 09-06-2010, 01:43 PM
TheTexasHammer's Avatar
TheTexasHammer TheTexasHammer is offline
Mall ninja in training
 
Join Date: May 2009
Posts: 461
Thanks: 490
Thanked 456 Times in 208 Posts
Default

I guess I need to buy the glass jars then. Thx.
Quick reply to this message
Old 09-06-2010, 01:58 PM
MikeK's Avatar
MikeK MikeK is offline
Walking methane refinery
 
Join Date: Jul 2009
Location: Texas
Age: 56
Posts: 63,940
Thanks: 129,389
Thanked 152,741 Times in 44,507 Posts
Awards Showcase
Outstanding Member 
Total Awards: 1
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by TheTexasHammer View Post
I guess I need to buy the glass jars then. Thx.
If you look around, you can almost always find canning jars cheap. Second hand stores, garage sales and even auctions are all great resources. As well as craigslist and freecycle. No sense paying the ridiculous prices they want for them.
Quick reply to this message
Old 09-06-2010, 04:48 PM
The Saint's Avatar
The Saint The Saint is offline
Christian
 
Join Date: Sep 2009
Location: NORTH Western Michigan
Posts: 39,501
Thanks: 37,450
Thanked 50,611 Times in 21,632 Posts
Awards Showcase
Top Poster 
Total Awards: 1
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by danger View Post
Which model did you get? I thought the 921 would be large enough, but we end up making huge batches of stuff, so I recently bought the 930. I can pressure can up to 21 quart jars at a time now!
The medium size one whichever model that is, I like the idea of not replacing any rubber seals.



Quick reply to this message
Old 09-06-2010, 06:20 PM
AF-Jay's Avatar
AF-Jay AF-Jay is offline
two shots from freedom
 
Join Date: Sep 2010
Location: Chicago Area
Posts: 15
Thanks: 4
Thanked 19 Times in 8 Posts
Default

Unfortunately I figured out why you need the expensive vacuum sealer to do this. Basically the chamber style vacuum sealer can take the air out of the pouch with out sucking out the liquids. Like MikeK said the cheaper vacuum sealers and bags usually leak after a while. This is because of the moisture that gets trapped in the heat seal. With the chamber style sealer no moisture gets trapped.

Quote:
I have not studied the process of bagged tuna. It is not vacuumed otherwise the bag would be sucked in hard like the bricks of coffee. I think the tuna is placed inside the Mylar bag and then Irritated to kill all the bacteria. The process does not require heat.
Believe it or not apparently the plastic is so thick that it doesn't mold around the food like the cheaper vacuum bags.

Right now I'm compiling what I've found out about retort pouches so I can post the information here. Then in the coming weeks I'll do some experiments to see how well this works.

I do have one question though for the experienced canners out there. Does anyone know if the removal of air is essential to the canning process? So far all I've been able to figure out is that it's at least essential to the sealing process with mason jars.
Quick reply to this message
The Following User Says Thank You to AF-Jay For This Useful Post:
Old 09-06-2010, 07:07 PM
danger's Avatar
danger danger is offline
Trapper
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Location: Southern Michigan
Posts: 781
Thanks: 256
Thanked 718 Times in 348 Posts
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by AF-Jay View Post
I do have one question though for the experienced canners out there. Does anyone know if the removal of air is essential to the canning process? So far all I've been able to figure out is that it's at least essential to the sealing process with mason jars.
I would say that heat is the essential part of the pressure canning process. When using jars, the vacuum is created as part of the cooling process. Most recipes specify the amount of head space each jar should have.
Quick reply to this message
Reply

Bookmarks

Tags
canning, canning food, homemade mres, meal ready to eat, mre, stockpiling food, storing food, survival food preps



Quick Reply
Message:
Options

Register Now

In order to be able to post messages on the Survivalist Forum forums, you must first register.
Please enter your desired user name, your email address and other required details in the form below.
User Name:
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.
Password:
Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.
Email Address:
Gender
Insurance
Please select your insurance company (Optional)

Log-in

Human Verification

In order to verify that you are a human and not a spam bot, please enter the answer into the following box below based on the instructions contained in the graphic.



Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 10:30 PM.


Powered by vBulletin®
Copyright ©2000 - 2019, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Search Engine Optimisation provided by DragonByte SEO (Lite) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2019 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.
vBulletin Security provided by vBSecurity v2.2.2 (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2019 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.
Copyright © Kevin Felts 2006 - 2015,
Green theme by http://www.themesbydesign.net