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Old 01-21-2020, 07:12 AM
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Default Truly - - - The end of Privacy



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We've all waxed eloquent and endlessly extolled our concerns of surveillance cameras everywhere and our privacy disappearing.

Now.... Close to 7 billion cell phones are added to the list of government equipment.


The Secretive Company That Might End Privacy as We Know It
A little-known start-up helps law enforcement match photos of unknown people to their online images — and “might lead to a dystopian future or something,” a backer says.

https://www.nytimes.com/2020/01/18/t...cognition.html

......

His tiny company, Clearview AI, devised a groundbreaking facial recognition app. You take a picture of a person, upload it and get to see public photos of that person, along with links to where those photos appeared. The system — whose backbone is a database of more than three billion images that Clearview claims to have scraped from Facebook, YouTube, Venmo and millions of other websites — goes far beyond anything ever constructed by the United States government or Silicon Valley giants.

Federal and state law enforcement officers said that while they had only limited knowledge of how Clearview works and who is behind it, they had used its app to help solve shoplifting, identity theft, credit card fraud, murder and child sexual exploitation cases.

Until now, technology that readily identifies everyone based on his or her face has been taboo because of its radical erosion of privacy. Tech companies capable of releasing such a tool have refrained from doing so; in 2011, Google’s chairman at the time said it was the one technology the company had held back because it could be used “in a very bad way.” Some large cities, including San Francisco, have barred police from using facial recognition technology.

But without public scrutiny, more than 600 law enforcement agencies have started using Clearview in the past year, according to the company, which declined to provide a list. The computer code underlying its app, analyzed by The New York Times, includes programming language to pair it with augmented-reality glasses; users would potentially be able to identify every person they saw. The tool could identify activists at a protest or an attractive stranger on the subway, revealing not just their names but where they lived, what they did and whom they knew.

And it’s not just law enforcement: Clearview has also licensed the app to at least a handful of companies for security purposes.

“The weaponization possibilities of this are endless,” said Eric Goldman, co-director of the High Tech Law Institute at Santa Clara University. “Imagine a rogue law enforcement officer who wants to stalk potential romantic partners, or a foreign government using this to dig up secrets about people to blackmail them or throw them in jail.”

Clearview has shrouded itself in secrecy, avoiding debate about its boundary-pushing technology. When I began looking into the company in November, its website was a bare page showing a nonexistent Manhattan address as its place of business. The company’s one employee listed on LinkedIn, a sales manager named “John Good,” turned out to be Mr. Ton-That, using a fake name. For a month, people affiliated with the company would not return my emails or phone calls.
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Old 01-21-2020, 07:36 AM
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We also have the phenomena where people willingly purchase devices that listen to every word they say, day and night, including when they aren't home.

My neighbor was all overwhelmed over being able to just speak to her phone and have it dial numbers, search, send messages, etc. I pointed out to her that it was always listening to her, and it went right over her head.

WW

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Old 01-21-2020, 08:00 AM
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We also have the phenomena where people willingly purchase devices that listen to every word they say, day and night, including when they aren't home.

My neighbor was all overwhelmed over being able to just speak to her phone and have it dial numbers, search, send messages, etc. I pointed out to her that it was always listening to her, and it went right over her head.

WW

shoot straight - stay safe

Read an article last month that when the iPhone is turned off.... it isn't off. Supposedly, it stays triangulated to GPS at all times. I tend to believe it, as I went on a camping trip this past summer, turned the phone off and left it in the rig.... fully charged. Upon returning, a few days later.... the battery was dead.


........
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Old 01-21-2020, 11:08 AM
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Read an article last month that when the iPhone is turned off.... it isn't off. Supposedly, it stays triangulated to GPS at all times. I tend to believe it, as I went on a camping trip this past summer, turned the phone off and left it in the rig.... fully charged. Upon returning, a few days later.... the battery was dead.


........
And now the new phones don't allow you to remove the battery. We are constantly monitored unless we want to leave our phones at home or buy a big lead box to keep it in.
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Old 01-21-2020, 12:21 PM
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And now the new phones don't allow you to remove the battery. We are constantly monitored unless we want to leave our phones at home or buy a big lead box to keep it in.
Al is better than Pb for EM shielding.
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Old 01-21-2020, 12:54 PM
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A small tin cookie box might do.
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Old 01-21-2020, 01:00 PM
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A small tin cookie box might do.
or you could just leave your cell phone at home when you leave the house. I do not advocate for breaking the law but what people do 24/7 is nobody's business except for theirs. When anyone else wants to know what you had for breakfast, they have gone too far.
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Old 01-21-2020, 01:19 PM
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or you could just leave your cell phone at home when you leave the house. I do not advocate for breaking the law but what people do 24/7 is nobody's business except for theirs. When anyone else wants to know what you had for breakfast, they have gone too far.
Sadly in today’s day and age, the damn things are pretty much a business requirement. I do advocate however that you leave it turned off and in your pocket unless you need to use it and /or check for voice mails. I try to train my clients to always leave a message. I don’t know how much business I may be losing by not picking up a call immediately, but I don’t care.

I wonder if anyone has designed a case, either soft or hard, with aluminum or maybe copper woven in?
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Old 01-21-2020, 02:07 PM
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Sadly in today’s day and age, the damn things are pretty much a business requirement. I do advocate however that you leave it turned off and in your pocket unless you need to use it and /or check for voice mails. I try to train my clients to always leave a message. I don’t know how much business I may be losing by not picking up a call immediately, but I don’t care.

I wonder if anyone has designed a case, either soft or hard, with aluminum or maybe copper woven in?
Unfortunately, from what I understand, just simple metallic case will not protect you, it also needs to have an electric current running through it to truly block out all signals. Think of it as a Faraday Cage on steroids. I read a book one time about the design of underground bunkers where they were trying to block any form of eavesdropping on highly secures conversations taking place in it. The book said that to block out even the laser listening devices that they lined the room with small copper wires and then ran an electrical current through it that amounted to what an old analog telephone line used. Not enough to hurt anyone or even for anyone to notice any shock from it, but it was successful in blocking out all forms of electronic infiltration.
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Old 01-21-2020, 02:22 PM
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Yet we’re only needing to block our phone’s output, not an incoming EMP burst. Considering how I often can’t get a signal when I want it, it shouldn’t be that hard...
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Old 01-25-2020, 08:20 AM
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Big John - I don't know if it turns it completely off, but try putting it in Airplane mode. I know that cuts off all inbound attempts to communicate and also disallows wifi hookup.

Also turn off the "find me" mode.

WW

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Old 01-25-2020, 09:15 AM
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Read an article last month that when the iPhone is turned off.... it isn't off. Supposedly, it stays triangulated to GPS at all times. I tend to believe it, as I went on a camping trip this past summer, turned the phone off and left it in the rig.... fully charged. Upon returning, a few days later.... the battery was dead.


........
Still loving my 2006 vintage CDMA Motorola Razr V3M. If I turn it off, it is off. I can also easily remove the battery.

If I leave it on, the battery is good for 9 days because it is too dumb to be running stuff in the background.

It also works in places on the Verizon network the newer phones cant get a signal. Verizon told me it will stop working in Dec 2020. But they said that it would stop working in Dec 2019, Dec 2018, etc. Fact is too much of their business is on the old technology.

Wife bugs me every few months to get a smartphone, says the Razr is "old fashioned" , "reflects badly on me being in tech business". Really?

I figure I have saved over $7 grand in the 14 years I have had this phone by not upgrading to the fanciest new model every 2 or 3 years and not having pricey data services.

Smart phones are crappy Swiss army knives of tech. They do a lot, but none of it well. And unlike the Swiss, they are aggressive nasty political operatives.

The only good smartphone is one that is blended:

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Old 01-26-2020, 03:59 PM
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If you need a phone for work etc. Not running Android (Google) or IOS (Apple) that is rugged and a removable battery check out the Sonim XP3. Simple Rugged Flip phone https://www.sonimtech.com/xp3/
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Old 01-26-2020, 09:01 PM
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Rather than the chore of turning it off and on daily, I wonder if keeping the phone in a sound insulating metal tin or plastic case that totally encompasses the phone would prevent eaves dropping?

Something like an Otterbox or similar.
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Old 01-26-2020, 09:07 PM
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You should watch Person of Interest on Netflix....it's fiction, but sounds like it's about to become very real.Scary world we live in
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Old 01-26-2020, 09:07 PM
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Originally Posted by Big_John View Post
We've all waxed eloquent and endlessly extolled our concerns of surveillance cameras everywhere and our privacy disappearing.



Now.... Close to 7 billion cell phones are added to the list of government equipment.





The Secretive Company That Might End Privacy as We Know It

A little-known start-up helps law enforcement match photos of unknown people to their online images — and “might lead to a dystopian future or something,” a backer says.



https://www.nytimes.com/2020/01/18/t...cognition.html



......



His tiny company, Clearview AI, devised a groundbreaking facial recognition app. You take a picture of a person, upload it and get to see public photos of that person, along with links to where those photos appeared. The system — whose backbone is a database of more than three billion images that Clearview claims to have scraped from Facebook, YouTube, Venmo and millions of other websites — goes far beyond anything ever constructed by the United States government or Silicon Valley giants.



Federal and state law enforcement officers said that while they had only limited knowledge of how Clearview works and who is behind it, they had used its app to help solve shoplifting, identity theft, credit card fraud, murder and child sexual exploitation cases.



Until now, technology that readily identifies everyone based on his or her face has been taboo because of its radical erosion of privacy. Tech companies capable of releasing such a tool have refrained from doing so; in 2011, Google’s chairman at the time said it was the one technology the company had held back because it could be used “in a very bad way.” Some large cities, including San Francisco, have barred police from using facial recognition technology.



But without public scrutiny, more than 600 law enforcement agencies have started using Clearview in the past year, according to the company, which declined to provide a list. The computer code underlying its app, analyzed by The New York Times, includes programming language to pair it with augmented-reality glasses; users would potentially be able to identify every person they saw. The tool could identify activists at a protest or an attractive stranger on the subway, revealing not just their names but where they lived, what they did and whom they knew.



And it’s not just law enforcement: Clearview has also licensed the app to at least a handful of companies for security purposes.



“The weaponization possibilities of this are endless,” said Eric Goldman, co-director of the High Tech Law Institute at Santa Clara University. “Imagine a rogue law enforcement officer who wants to stalk potential romantic partners, or a foreign government using this to dig up secrets about people to blackmail them or throw them in jail.”



Clearview has shrouded itself in secrecy, avoiding debate about its boundary-pushing technology. When I began looking into the company in November, its website was a bare page showing a nonexistent Manhattan address as its place of business. The company’s one employee listed on LinkedIn, a sales manager named “John Good,” turned out to be Mr. Ton-That, using a fake name. For a month, people affiliated with the company would not return my emails or phone calls.
Surprised SF would be against it, the mecca of data mining.

Interesting stuff I was unaware of, despite being balls deep in the tech industry. Unsurprising LE admits to abusing this power.

The deep state will soon have us all and the constitution lost to socialism if we do not resist.

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Old 01-26-2020, 09:09 PM
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Rather than the chore of turning it off and on daily, I wonder if keeping the phone in a sound insulating metal tin or plastic case that totally encompasses the phone would prevent eaves dropping?

Something like an Otterbox or similar.
A major component of the privacy issue is the GPS logging of you and your phone 24/7/365. THEY can determine where you go, who you associate with (-via their own GPS metadata).

Go ahead and put it into a soundproof box. THEY already know your schedule, so slipping into your home and bugging the TV or your lamp is a risk free black bag OP.

The only good smartphone is a dead one.

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Old 01-26-2020, 09:11 PM
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If you need a phone for work etc. Not running Android (Google) or IOS (Apple) that is rugged and a removable battery check out the Sonim XP3. Simple Rugged Flip phone https://www.sonimtech.com/xp3/
I looked at those. Not pleased with ATT. If Verizon supports them it is a good option,

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Old 01-26-2020, 09:20 PM
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Scary Stuff. Glad I’m not young.
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Old 01-27-2020, 03:31 AM
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Originally Posted by Big_John View Post
Read an article last month that when the iPhone is turned off.... it isn't off. Supposedly, it stays triangulated to GPS at all times. I tend to believe it, as I went on a camping trip this past summer, turned the phone off and left it in the rig.... fully charged. Upon returning, a few days later.... the battery was dead.
The battery used in your iPhone will self discharge and that process accelerates at higher ambient temperatures what you have described is not unusual.
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