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Old 11-11-2019, 02:33 AM
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Default Australia is drying out and on fire.



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I’ve lived on the north side of Brisbane my whole life. In that time I’ve witnessed some pretty wild weather. Droughts, floods, cyclones and bush fires. In the past 16 years we’ve had two major droughts and two flood events.

Right now almost the entire eastern side of the continent is under severe drought and is on fire in many places. So far three people have died and hundreds of homes and property destroyed, and the worst is yet to come.

Unusually dry air has been blowing over from Western Australia drying the eastern half to a crisp. In my 43 years of living here I’ve never seen it so dry for so long. Here, a mere 8km from the coast, we’ve received around 1/10th of our annual rainfall this year (most of that in one day in March) and since winter we’ve had a fraction over an inch.

The dry air and gusty winds have provided the perfect conditions for catastrophic fires, of which approximately 100 separate fires are burning and have thus far consumed around a million hectares of forest.

There’s no forecast for any significant rain this side of Christmas, and the agricultural industry Australia wide is being decimated. My brother-in-law has gone from 2,000 sheep down to 300, and from 300 head of cattle down to 12. He’s not harvested a crop for three years and every other farm between northern Victoria in the south to North Queensland is in the same situation.

Even if when we get rain, most farmers will need 5 years or more of stable weather to recover, which is not likely.

Country towns are quite literally running out of water and are having to truck water in to supply residents with water. This is affecting tens of thousands of people.

Private water carriers are running their trucks 24/7 and there’s a six week wait for water delivery. Most people outside of urban areas rely on rainwater tanks for their water supply. If it doesn’t rain, they have to buy water to top up their tanks.

The air is so dry I’ve been waking up the last few weeks during the night choking from my mouth drying out. Normally the humidity stays above 50% most of the year, but it’s been as low as 7% during the day and feels more like the outback than a coastal environment..

Certainly it will rain again, and flood, but this is now the worst drought since records began and there’s no relief in sight.
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Old 11-11-2019, 02:40 AM
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The air is so dry I’ve been waking up the last few weeks during the night choking from my mouth drying out. Normally the humidity stays above 50% most of the year, but it’s been as low as 7% during the day and feels more like the outback than a coastal environment..
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I wonder if it would help you if you put an open pitcher or two of water in your room during the night, or a big bowl of water, and put a clean, new rag in each one as a wick, with one end in the water, and the other end hanging out of the top of the pitcher.

Or maybe you have dry mouth because of stress, and could treat it with sprays, etc?
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Old 11-11-2019, 02:53 AM
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I wonder if it would help you if you put an open pitcher or two of water in your room during the night, or a big bowl of water, and put a clean, new rag in each one as a wick, with one end in the water, and the other end hanging out of the top of the pitcher.

Or maybe you have dry mouth because of stress, and could treat it with sprays, etc?
Not stress. Everyone I talk has had similar issues with keeping their mouth wet. Doesnít seem to matter how hydrated you are either. Itís just so dry the air sucks any moisture out of you.
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Old 11-11-2019, 08:03 AM
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Not stress. Everyone I talk has had similar issues with keeping their mouth wet. Doesnít seem to matter how hydrated you are either. Itís just so dry the air sucks any moisture out of you.
I've experienced that in the Atacama desert.

I hope rain visits you soon.

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Old 11-11-2019, 03:37 PM
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The cycle here is multi year drought, massive wildfires, flood, mud slides, repeat.
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Old 11-13-2019, 07:06 PM
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Single-digit humidity anywhere is not going to end well. If you live anywhere that goes to that for more than a week - just leave. I realise that this is happening in more places globally and the transition is the more difficult period. Previously if there was sufficient water for trees, they remain reservoirs of wood and moisture but when the water table drops and the humidity too, you have dead trees that are just fuel for looming disasters.
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Old 11-13-2019, 08:05 PM
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Seems like a good time to clear some brush
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Old 11-13-2019, 08:22 PM
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In most cases, houses that burn down in bush/forest fires are built close enough to the trees that when the trees next burn, the house will burn.

Fire is natural. It is always a matter of time as to when the trees will next burn.

Houses that have a large enough cleared space around them to be defendable/survivable in fire are not as cute - but they can survive the inevitable fire will come along some time.

Conducting fuel reduction burns during the colder/wetter times of the year can be challenging - both during droughts and just trying to avoid houses being burned down even by mild fires.
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Old 11-13-2019, 09:01 PM
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G'day...
People I correspond with down under saying the gum trees are an oily wood. I imagine that is similar in fire danger to the sap, resin in the conifer here.

Also like here, the undergrowth has been left to get too dense, dies out, makes wonderful tinder for any ignition source.

One area there saying an arsonist is to blame for some issues. Some one with the gear and such to bluff there way into places they shouldn't be and cause trouble. Sick...

The two summers before this past summer were bad for fires. This past summer wasn't bad all considered. One interesting note, the fire locations this summer on a map and a map of provincial and district parks and camp grounds overlaid surprisingly similar..

Put 2 and 2 together it seems.
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Old 11-15-2019, 05:52 PM
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The global water crisis is real https://www.cnn.com/2019/11/15/austr...cli/index.html "the city of Sydney -- home to more than 5 million people -- faces a warning that dams could run dry by 2022" https://www.reuters.com/article/us-a...-idUSKBN1WC2EP "“A lot of towns are forecast to run out at the same time " ... australia isn't alone though this is happening all around the world, including in the USA. "Level 2 restrictions would further limit the use of water in daily operations -- for example, only allowing watering gardens a few days a week instead of every day."

yeah got to built inland rivers... you want to stay dig a canal in from the ocean and build some desalination plants. what you really got to do is plant plants that don't need water to grow.


https://www.offthegridnews.com/survi...rely-get-rain/

drip irrigation...

https://www.housebeautiful.com/lifes...minimal-water/

http://www.fao.org/3/S2022E/s2022e02.htm



This crisis will pale in comparison to what will happen when China diverts its water away from SouthEast Asia, and India blocks flows into Pakistan.


Australia is WAY WAY closer to antarctica to get some microclimate projects going with the disintigrating ice shelves. They just arn't willing to spend public funds to fix poor people problems.


https://www.sciencealert.com/a-giant...-than-expected

lots of water there...
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Old 11-17-2019, 05:20 AM
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Poor koalas... they don't run from fires, they climb trees. This works for *regular* forest fires, but not fire storms

http://www.startribune.com/saving-th...las/564939602/

http://www.startribune.com/conservat...res/564087832/

https://www.abc.net.au/news/2019-11-...fires/11671924

https://www.washingtonpost.com/scien...re-koala-bear/
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Old 11-18-2019, 10:29 AM
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I saw it in the news It’s really devastating It’s climate change, there’s no doubt about it.
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Old 11-18-2019, 05:44 PM
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I saw it in the news It’s really devastating It’s climate change, there’s no doubt about it.
There is no doubt the climate is changing.

The climate has always changed. Sea level has always changed. The Australian aboriginals walked to Australia from New Guinea about 40,000 years ago, at a time when the sea level was so much lower than now, that there was a land bridge.

Weather and specifically ambient temperature are always changing in cycles with wavelength from a few decades to a 100 million years or so. These separate cycles have various levels of influence and are superimposed upon each other - resulting in a very complex natural system controlling temperature.

Consequently, the contention that the changes in the last few decades are different to these natural cycles and uniquely caused by human activity (and among these influences, specifically CO2) is very hard to prove.

Despite this lack of proof, governments are responding to what is now only supported by collective belief and spending billions of dollars to solve a problem that may not exist.

This belief may in fact be more an aspect of human psychology - as it is known that many human civilizations (aztecs, mayans, egyptians, babylonians, romans, greeks, etc) have previously noticed that their climate was changing and concluded that it was somehow their fault. In all these cases, the leadership of those civilizations chose to respond to the concerned population and make sacrifices in the hope that this would reverse the change in climate (or perhaps in a cynical attempt to just address the concern and in doing so keep their leadership role).

Does that sound familiar?

But our civilization knows that those previous civilizations were wrong (because they were producing insignificant amounts of CO2), but is also arrogant enough to think that we are right about human influence/causation this time.

The current climate change movement has evolved into matter of faith/belief. It's followers no longer look for proof. They are past that stage......now they mostly concentrate upon indoctrination of the young and intimidation of heretics.
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Old 11-20-2019, 02:31 AM
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Are koalas good eating?
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Old 11-20-2019, 02:54 AM
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I've experienced that in the Atacama desert.

I hope rain visits you soon.

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Old 12-09-2019, 03:09 AM
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“If the drought went on for another four years, that would be Armageddon for Australia,” sez outback farmer who lives 270 miles outside of Sydney.

NYT article on Australia's southern hemisphere springtime drought.

They're now facing whether the drought will continue over summer, which takes place during our winter months.

Quote:
The Burrendong Dam reservoir, which feeds the river, is currently at about 3 percent of its capacity.

...

But in some parts of Australia, low-quality groundwater has caused problems.

In towns north of Dubbo, residents have reported foul-smelling, metallic-tasting water, as well as medical problems like high blood pressure and skin conditions. Some said they had received no warning that the water might be unsafe to drink.

“At the worst, it tastes like you bit your cheek and it was bleeding,”

...

In Australia’s cities, the picture is somewhat less bleak, but even there, water supplies are running short. The reservoir at Sydney’s dam is less than half full, and the city has employed “water officers” to educate citizens and enforce restrictions.

The government of Victoria has ruled out building more dams to serve rural areas and the city of Melbourne, because river flow in that state is expected to drop by half by 2065.

Possible solutions include recycling water and relying on desalination plants, which are often criticized for their high energy use and the potential environmental harm of ejecting brine back into the ocean. These methods are crucial, though, if Australia is to remain livable under dire climate change scenarios, policy experts say.
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Old 12-09-2019, 02:20 PM
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Australia was a desert long before European colonization.

Why act so surprised?

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Desert...Climate_issues

Quote:
Forty percent of Australia is covered by dunes. Central Australia is very dry, averaging 150 mm of rainfall each year.


Quote:
Map showing the number of rain days (i.e. days with more than 0.2 mm of precipitation) in Australia Data source: http://www.australien-info.de/daten-niederschlag.html less than 20 (dark yellow) 20 to 40 (medium yellow) 40 to 80 (yellow) 80 to 120 (light blue) 120 to 160 (blue) over 160 (dark blue)
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Old 12-09-2019, 04:45 PM
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Default dry Australia

Anyone know where the world's largest desert is?
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Old 12-09-2019, 05:48 PM
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Anyone know where the world's largest desert is?
I should think the combined Sahara+Arabian

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Old 12-09-2019, 07:22 PM
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My aunt live in Sydney. She tell me: "When the amazon rainforest went up in flames it burnt 125,000 hectares. Australia so far has lost 970,000 hectares"

This fires is big.
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