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Old 10-29-2019, 05:02 PM
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It's a rainy day in Georgia; a steady light rain with mild temps that the veggies are just loving. I just came in from a slow stroll through the garden and the pitter patter of rain on the umbrella was peaceful. Nice!

Yesterday I picked one pound of Contender green beans. Today I see that in a few days the first "Jade" green beans will be ready. The first few Russian Inferno garlics have poked up but not a sign of the Siberians yet. And I spied a 2" wide broccoli button so it won't be long until there's a head to cut.

I've been picking dried Big Red Ripper field pea pods, shelling and sorting for next year's planting seed. The last big saving and sorting of these was 2017 and being that there was a lot left that's not needed now, I cooked them! Good stuff!



Things grow wherever they can. There's been a half bucket of the compost load we bought in the spring and it's been sitting around awhile. Yesterday I noticed that it decided to grow its own garden. A couple of tomatoes, what looks like a squash plant (or a flower?) and a few unknowns. Maybe I should pot up one of those tomatoes and bring it indoors just for grins and giggles.



One of the weather sites is forecasting a low of 37 and 38 for Sunday and Monday. Average first frost here is Nov 15 so the time's coming.

And finally, Camellia time is beginning, first the sasanqua varieties with their smaller leaves and flowers and later in January/February the big leafed and big flowered japonicas will kick in. Today I leave you with a sasanqua called 'Apple Blossom'....


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Old 11-01-2019, 04:20 PM
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Yesterday afternoon a cold front blew through, donating 8/10" rain and knocked that 86 degree high right on its butt. This morning it was 38 and there was frost on the vehicle windshields but not on the grass. Regardless, I got dressed quick, went down to the garden and hosed off the peppers and beans before the sun cleared the trees, just in case there was any frost. They look fine this afternoon.

There's a frost advisory for tomorrow morning so after lunch 5th Gear and I did a quick switch of row cover for the deer netting on the two bean beds. This evening I'll lower the sides to tunnel them.



The peppers are looking kind of old now but they're still making peppers. 5th Gear picked a pound of jalapenos this morning and will try her hand at making cowboy candy. I have some old bed sheets that will be draped over the plants tonight.



A while ago I posted about sweet potato vines all over the compost pile and yesterday I noticed that the vines were starting to die back.



Time to turn the compost pile and see what's there. Nothing but a few rotty old sweet potato discards. I guess the vines started and then just rooted themselves all over the place.

Three of the four kinds of garlic planted Oct 14 are up. On the left side of the bed are two kinds, Maiskij and Shilla, that were planted using bulbs I grew last year. On the right side are Russian Inferno and Siberian, two new ones I bought to try this year. The first ones that came up were my own stock. So far only half of the Infernos and none of the Siberians are up yet.



The Roselle plants I'm growing are annuals.





In case we have more frost than they think, I went ahead and cut the calyxes off the plants and will dehydrate them to make tea with. There were 204 calyxes on three plants!

There are muscadine grapes defrosting in the kitchen so I can make grape juice this afternoon and jelly tomorrow. A nice fall project!
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Old 11-03-2019, 11:48 AM
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There was more scattered frost yesterday and this morning but the row covers took care of it. However the cold weather is really slowing down the beans. Lots of babies on them and a ton of flowers and I'm hoping they will continue to produce. We'll see.

The peppers are now sporting bed sheets overnight. They should have been dressed like this for Halloween.



The other fall things in the garden are doing just fine and loving the cool weather. These are the eight cauliflower plants; four planted Aug 14 and four (in front of the larger ones) planted out Aug 31. The earlier ones are looking nice but no buttons yet. Keeping my fingers crossed!



These are the broccoli plants in the other half of the cauliflower bed. The four early and four later ones were planted out the same time as the two sets of cauliflowers. The broccoli plants are a lot bigger than the cauliflower plants.



One of the older plants has a nice 4" head coming along, two other plants have different sized buttons and one hasn't decided to participate yet so it looks like the heads will be staggered well.



This is the spiny cuke bed with scallions down the left side. Three varieties of scallions. I had forgotten to assign a bed to them and then decided to rake the cuke vines to one side and stick the scallions in there with them. That bed won't be needed until late April when popcorn will be planted there. By then the bed will be empty.



Pot roast for lunch today! Man, the house smells soooo good as it simmers on the stove. I'm making green bean casserole fresh with beans from the garden and baking the first sweet potatoes from the new crop to go with it. Good stuff!
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Old 11-09-2019, 11:23 AM
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Since last week, garden chores have mostly consisted of patrolling for any problems, watering once and getting ready for colder weather. It's so nice to not see a ton of bugs out and about!

On Thursday I picked what is most likely the last 2 lbs of green beans. 5th Gear has the canner going putting up those last four pints of beans for the year. I also picked the last of the peppers, both sweet and ancho. They'll probably all get dehydrated.

Speaking of dehydrating, I picked about 200 roselle calyxes and got the pieces dehydrated for tea. That's a ton of Vitamin C and a lot of other good stuff in two quart jars.



After several scattered light frosts, we'll probably be getting the first killing frost Tuesday and daytime highs in the 50's. The brassicas should be able to take that with no problem but they haven't had much time to acclimate between warm and cold. Just to be on the safe side we swapped out the deer netting for plastic on those two beds. The turnip bed got covered too as those plants are still young and rather tender. The cabbages will be fine by themselves. Tough customers they are!



This morning I opened the sides and ends and will probably leave them up until Monday when those upper 20's will probably happen Tuesday morning.



Yesterday I cut a mess of kale and tomorrow will make a great kale-chorizo-white bean soup. It's sooo good and my favorite use of kale. I've not yet made any kale chips worth talking about.

Starting at noon the rest of today will be devoted to football. Some great ranked vs ranked games! Next week is soon enough to begin the chore of clearing the garden.
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Old 11-11-2019, 06:17 PM
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I’ve been playing with tunnel temps. The day after we put the plastic on I didn’t get down there to open the ends until 10:30. It was already 85 in the tunnels. Oops! Opening the ends of the tunnels and a cool breeze blowing through quickly brought the temp down to 75. It was amazing how much heat that breeze coming in one end was pushing out the other! Then I raised one side a little to keep the breeze from billowing out the sides and the temp dropped to and settled in at 68.

Things are looking good. The turnip greens are getting pretty. This is the kale (just cut) and collard end of one bed:



And this is the cauliflower end of another:



But things that weren’t covered were smacked down by yesterday’s heavy frost. It looked like it had snowed out in the pasture. It was last rites for the beans, peppers, spiny cukes, roselle and asters. The tomatoes were done in a couple days ago. Poor little spiny cukes…



The asters now have just a few surviving blooms left and there were several butterflies and assorted flying things getting in one last snack:



And finally the roselle is done. It was a pretty successful experiment and will be a permanent addition. I have plenty of seed so if anyone wants to try some, just PM me.



Tomorrow morning will only get down to 53 with light rain but that will be the high of the day as temps fall into the 20’s overnight. I had forgotten about covering the little baby (2” tall) carrots and radishes so I’ve just come from sprinkling leaves and pinestraw over them. I sure hope that does the trick!
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Old 11-12-2019, 11:12 AM
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There's not much going on in the garden today. It's lightly raining and everything's buttoned up even though it's just 59 out there. That's as high as it will get today as the temps will drop this afternoon into the 20's tonight. It's already 47 one hour west of here and 36 two hours west of here in Atlanta so it's coming.

Last evening as I was closing the tunnels I remembered the carrot seedlings (up 2") and radishes. They ended up getting some pine straw sprinkled over them. It will have to do.

But yesterday was nice and the porch garden liked it.



In the back left corner is a pot of rosemary and one of mint. To the right are various Little Gem romaine lettuces and dwarf bok choy plants we've been munching. I don't know if the bok choy is "cut and come again" but we'll see! Unseen to the right are the window boxes of mixed lettuces and the parsley. I'm going to dump those lettuces as they're the wimpy type with no crunch. Being just pretty doesn't cut it. Out they go and I'll start more Little Gem.

The camellia is 'Yuletide, one of the small leafed sasanqua types.



It usually blooms around Christmas and would this year if it were in the ground and not still in the pot. Gotta get that sucker in the ground.

Y'all stay warm today.
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Old 11-13-2019, 05:43 PM
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It was pretty chilly for the second week of November in this part of the country. The temp dipped to 27 before the sun cleared the trees and didn't get above 46. The wind chill had to have been colder as there was a stiff northeasterly breeze blowing. Still, at 10am I opened the tunnel ends to dry up the condensation in there to prevent fungus.

But I did find that the one broccoli head I've had my eye on was ready to cut with another not far behind. Here's the first Packman of the fall, 7" wide and the plant will continue to kick out side shoots.



With nothing decent on the tv last night it was a good time to go through the seed box and do an inventory. The box used to be a mess until I started putting similar items together in small ziplocks. Tomatoes, eggplant and peppers share a bag, root stuff like turnips, beets, and carrots are in another. There's a gallon sized ziplock for beans, peas, innoculent and corn but the bush beans and pole beans have their own separate small bags inside the larger bag. That old metal bread box has held seeds for years.



After the inventory there were packs of seeds that for various reasons won't be used next spring. A few years ago I decided to stop tossing out seeds I didn't want any more and put them in a "vault" in the freezer instead. You never know when you might want to try them again. And when there are more seeds in a pack that will never get used before they go bad, half of them go into the vault.



The seeds are in small coin envelopes with the purchase or collection year and other info written on it. The envelopes go into a zip lock bag (you just know they're in alphabetical order by seed type ) which goes into a plastic container with a snap on lid. Yesterday's additions made expansion to a third box necessary, taking up more freezer room. One of these days I'll just have to stop being the pack rat and toss out the seeds for stuff that I know won't do well.

I do have an excel spreadsheet with all of the vault contents on it. It's a simple copy/paste of the lines from the current year's garden spread and is now 97 lines long! Looking down the list was like a walk down memory lane... "Oh, I remember that one. Good carrot but weak tops."



Time to go feed the cats. My favorite big boy has become diabetic. Fortunately we caught it before it got bad so now I have to give him an insulin shot twice a day. I get him when I set his food bowl down and he's so eager to eat that he doesn't notice the shot! The things we do for our furry ones.
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Old 11-14-2019, 03:40 PM
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After a morning low of 31 and not the predicted mid 20's, I think we're over the hump. It's been another rather raw day, a breezy 42 with a kind of damp feeling. Still, temps will be slowly increasing over the next week so I removed the plastic tunnels from two of the three beds. The plastic sheets were hung on the line to dry so that no mold etc would form if they were folded up and stowed away wet.

One of those sheets was a 8'x25' thing which was a pain in the patoot to hang with the breeze blowing. A giant billowing sail! Since two sheets filled the lines, the third will have to wait. I opened the ends of that tunnel and raised the sides a little, hoping it will dry itself before rain comes in tomorrow. If not, it will wait a few days.

I need to start doing an end of year review, looking over the good, the bad and the ugly. There's never a year when I don't learn something out in the garden. Time to go over the lessons because it's almost time to start planning for next year!
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Old 11-21-2019, 07:26 AM
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Default Tomato Growing Revised For 2020

Garden debris removal has finally begun and I can probably finish it up today.

5th Gear and I have been discussing tomatoes for next year. This year we had one each of 15 varieties going. The problem was that there were never enough tomatoes ready all at once to get any decent canning done. Many didn't hold well once picked so a lot went bad while waiting for more to ripen. In addition, there were a lot of new-to-us varieties, some of which didn't do so well. Thus, a shortage of canning tomatoes.

The new strategy will be to grow several plants of each of two or three determinate varieties up at the house for canning. Early Girl, Rio Grande and Red Siberian (the last two of these were newbies here) did well this year. Most indeterminates will be grown in buckets in the garden.

For good or bad, I found a tomato seed SALE!

https://www.tomatofest.com/Tomato_Se..._Sale_s/43.htm

After browsing through their hundreds of varieties all evening, there will now be seven new tomatoes for spring with the emphasis on their ability to do well in hot climates and being dual purpose, for canning and fresh eating. Plant descriptions are excerpted from the Tomatofest catalog.

Porter Days: 72, Indeterminate, Red, Mid-Season
A good choice for a salad tomato, canning, tomato sauces, eating fresh or making tomato juice. A good container tomato for hot, dry growing conditions. Porter also does well in hot humid areas.

Santiago Days: 68, Indeterminate, Red, Early Season
From Guatamala..Among the first to bear fruit and one of the last of the season to be harvested. Plant produces a prolific amount of 8-10 oz., flattened, and lightly fluted, red beefsteak tomatoes that have a good tart and very pronounced sweet flavors. A very good canning tomato, and wonderful snacking fresh off the vine. This tomato variety seems to do very well in hot climates.

Super Sioux Days: 71, Semi-Determinate, Red, Mid-Season
From Nebraska. Perfect variety for hot and dry climates. Indeterminate, regular leaf plant produces big sets of crack-free, thick-skinned, round, red fruit. Good acid levels makes it even a better variety for canning.

Ten Fingers of Naples Days: 72, Determinate, Red, Mid-Season
Compact, determinate plants that yield huge crops in long trusses of 5-6", 3 oz., elongated tomatoes with a pointy end. Sweet rich tomatoey flavors rival the best of the best-tasting paste tomatoes for making an incredibly delicious sauce. A great canning tomato. Disease resistant.

Camp Joy (Cherry) Days: 81, Indeterminate, Cherry, Mid-Season
Heavy bearing open-pollinated variety; 1" cherry tomatoes with huge, well-balanced, sweet tomato flavors. Strong disease resistant.

Early Annie Days: 60, Determinate, Red, Early-Season
A short determinate heirloom variety with regular leaf that produces high yields of 4 oz., round, meaty fruits with few seeds. Particularly good for canning. Fruit sets all at once.

Mom's Paste Days: 84, Indeterminate, Red, Late-Season
A beautiful large red paste with a pointed plum shape borne from a wispy, regular leafed plant that get to 12 oz.. Delicious! A very tasty, meaty tomato.

I'll be interested in watching the 'Early Annie'. If she does well, she'll join the others up at the house in 2021. For cherry purposes, 'Camp Joy' will replace 'Juliet'.

It's amazing how just going through a catalog will get tired gardening juices revved up!
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Old 11-23-2019, 02:49 PM
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Well, the debris clean up didn't happen yesterday. The first leaves have been coming down but have been wet with the occasional rain shower. Yesterday they were finally dry enough that the leaf bagger on the mower could hoover them up so with rain coming in later today, I decided to do that. It's a nice start to remaking the garden mulch pile.



This pile is maybe a quarter of the size it will be with another same sized pile up behind the house. In fact, I need some of it for mulch right now.The good news is that most of the leaves are still up in the trees so there will be plenty to gather.

We just cut the second broccoli head two days ago but #3 and #4 are about ready!



The turnips are coming along. This is the old Purple Top on the left and that unknown Korean turnip seed I bought at the Korean grocery. The Korean ones are developing a bit of a purple tint on the leaves. I think they're also smaller since they were seeded about 2 weeks after the Purple Tops.



The cabbages are doing great this fall. On the left, the first four are 'Stonehead' with three 'Premium Late Flat Dutch behind them'. On the right are four 'Charleston Wakefield' with three 'Red Acre' behind them.



Today I cut the first Stonehead and it weighed just a tad over 3 lbs. 5th Gear is going to make kimchi with it.



And finally, last spring I read an article on planting potatoes in the fall. The idea was that they'll just sit down there growing roots all winter so that when it warms up in spring, they'll pop up earlier than spring planted ones and produce more. OK, I'll play. A month ago I stuck three potatoes in the ground; two Yukons and one Red Pontiac. Today I noticed that they're coming up.



I guess I'll just have to start hilling them and hoping that as it gets colder they'll slow down and go to sleep for the rest of the winter!
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Old 11-26-2019, 10:05 AM
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Default Season Summary - Part 1: Successes

It's time to look back at this year's garden and see what worked and what didn't. I'll start today with the successes. Later postings will deal with Not So Goods, Failures, Experiments and some thoughts about things to change for 2020.

Overall, this year’s winners were corn, cukes, fall cabbages, carrots, collards, eggplant, field peas, kale, okra, peppers, potatoes (both Irish and sweets) and summer squash. Special mentions:

Cabbages – This fall’s cabbage plants are the prettiest we’ve ever grown. A couple of ‘Stonehead’ and ‘Charleston Wakefield’ are ready to cut.

Carrots – This was the first time I tried ‘Yaya’. They worked really well in spring and as they’re in the fall garden, we’ll see how they do over the winter.



‘Romance’ carrots also did well, another first timer.



Corn – ‘Silver Queen’ planted in double rows 4’ apart worked great but 4' is too much. maybe back to 3' or 3.5' next year. Got three good pickings (that was a first!) and maybe could have had a fourth of small “nubbin” ears if I had paid attention. Hardly any smut this year.





Cukes – The ‘National Pickler’ cukes in one bed made a ton and we gave a lot away. 5th Gear planted the last of the ‘Marketmore’ seed need the bean trellis.., oops! What a mess on the trellis.

Eggplant - One plant of ‘Millionaire’ grown in a bucket made all we wanted and more all summer until almost frost.



Peppers – Alma and Feher Ozon paprikas, Ancho, Big Jim, Gypsy, Mucho Nacho and M jalapenos, Jupiter bell and sweet banana all did well. Too many peppers! Next spring I’ll probably drop the Big Jims, Jupiter, sweet banana and both paprikas. Gypsys and Anchos:




Potatoes – Both Irish and Sweet did well but we cut back on how many hills of sweets were planted simply to match what we’d actually use from storage. I’m not real pleased with the texture of home canned sweet potatoes.

Field peas – The ‘Red Rippers’ always make a bunch. No different this year. But for the first time I tried the little Lady Peas with seed sent by a friend. I thought, “Good grief! It’s gonna take a ton of shelling just to make a half cup of peas!” Well, they yielded a bit better than that but they were so good I saved seed and will plant again.



Okra – The okra struggled in July’s heat which is unusual. I kept pouring water on them while hoping it wasn’t nematodes.



By the end of August they had come out of it and were producing well.



When I finally pulled the plants out I found that they did have some nematode damage on the roots but somehow as they got older they somehow did well anyway, which really surprised me as okra is really susceptible to ‘todes.

Summer Squash – Usually squash vine borers decimate them. Just to make sure we got at least some to eat I seeded 8 hills. Of course, don’t you know they all made! This was the best production we’ve had in ages. The interesting thing is that in the end they all had nematoded roots but they still produced. They were all planted a bit earlier than usual and I’m wondering if the roots matured enough before the ‘todes woke up that the roots withstood some of the damage. Something to keep an eye on.
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Old 11-28-2019, 09:21 AM
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Default Happy thanksgiving!

Wishing all of you a great day with family, friends and food! We've already had the traditional slice of pumpkin pie with this morning's coffee.

I'm very thankful for all of the good people on this site and all of the knowledge you are willing to share.
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Old 11-28-2019, 10:15 AM
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Thank you for sharing all your experience and pictures with us all. Hope you and your family have a wonderful and restful day.
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Old 11-29-2019, 11:19 AM
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Default Season Summary - Part 2: The Not-So-Goods

No two gardening years are the same. Even some things that usually aren't a problem do have problems now and then, especially when I start tinkering and experimenting.

Corn – ‘Sweet Treat’ planted in a bed has always done fine until this year. Sweet Treat was selected for its ability to germinate well in soil temperatures cooler than what’s usually needed for corn. Depending on the source, soil temps should ideally be at least 70. I decided to push the envelope and planted it on April 6 with soil temp at 60.



It came up sparsely and then I waited a week or so before resowing to see if any more would come up. By the time that came up there were plants of all different sizes. The stressed Spring Treat started throwing tassels at 2' tall. Not good. Ears were small and because plants were all different sizes and maturity, pollination was affected. What corn made was good, just not a lot of it.



Lessons Learned: Don’t plant so early even if tempted by a short warm spell. Replanted skips never do well so plant extra right off the bat. Extra plants can always be thinned out.

Asparagus – It’s an old bed, mostly female plants and annual yield is decreasing. We’re considering letting it go. It’s too close to a pecan tree (partly under the canopy) and probably choked with tree roots. There are other male plants set out here and there outside the garden. We might add to those this year.

Bush Beans – 'Duke' bush beans were planted on April 28 along with most of the rest of the garden. However, there was a germination problem in that bed even though a subsequent germination test of the seed showed 95% good. Soil temp was OK. Go figure.

Then after a time nematodes affected the right half of the other bed. These yellowing plants and 'toded roots are Golden Rod.




Garlic – This was the third year planting garlic and after two great years, this one had problems. Early on there was yellowing of leaf tips and plants were thinner.



The bulbs were a lot smaller this year, not the nice 2-2.5” bulbs I’ve been getting.



Still, quantity counts too!



Tomatillo - This was Year 2 of trying to grow these. Last year they all died of some kind of wilt even though they grew in a bucket. This year they grew and even set fruit although not a lot. Many husks never filled out. Still, one picking is better than none!



This year will be the third and last try, using a different variety. And the root ball didn't even fill half of #15 bucket. A #10 or even a #7 will do this year.

Into each garden failures will happen and so in the next post I will make my confession. And although failures are disappointing, they are always learning experiences. It's that old, "What doesn't kill ya makes ya stronger" thing, I guess. It makes the victories ever sweeter.
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Old 11-29-2019, 05:21 PM
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Weedinhoe..........ur sweet corn bed looks like a horseshoe pit.
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Old 11-30-2019, 09:18 AM
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Quote:
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Weedinhoe..........ur sweet corn bed looks like a horseshoe pit.
ROFL! It does, doesn't it! Those circles are where some fertilizer (the white stuff in there) was drizzled in to go under the seed pre-plant.

The seed gets planted 6" apart around the circle resulting in about 8 plants per circle. In reality it ends up with about 6 or 7 seedlings. So far, except for this spring's fiasco, there are enough plants in each circle to pollinate each other. I'll probably sow every 3" now and then pull the extras for 8 plants per circle. Lesson learned!
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Default Season Summary - Part 3: Failures

Gardening is one of the biggest exercises in hoping that I know of. We all put seeds in the ground or in starter containers, cross our fingers and hope. Over and over again, every season and every year. Not everything works as planned, even tried and true things. Sometimes we can figure out why and sometimes we have no clue. Shoulders get shrugged and out pops the old "It'll be better next year." Hope in action.

Sweet Peas - There were a few things that didn't do well this year and one of those was the sweet peas. After trialing a bunch of varieties over the years I've settled on 'Wando' which will withstand the heat if hot weather comes early or if the peas got in late and thus get picked late. This year we ended up with only two quart bags of peas after having a bunch last year. One bed had a nematode problem and that's been noted on the garden map:



The other bed looked ok until pod set and then just didn't make as much.



Peaches - This would have been the first crop ever for this tree and there were a goodly number of peaches on it. They were small because I forgot about thinning but still, ripe and almost ripe peaches. One afternoon I went by on the mower, looked at the tree and made a note to pick some the next day. The next day I got a bucket, went to the tree and there was not a one on it, just a bunch of pits on the ground! Don't know if it was deer or other varmint but I'll have to protect the tree next spring.

Watermelons - Trying to grow melons that were smaller than last year's Georgia Rattlesnakes, we tried Stone Mountain and Ali Baba, one hill of each. They got some kind of virus, yellowed up and wilted. I'm going to toss that seed just in case it's infected.



Pole Beans - We tried some Blue Lakes on a trellis made of fencing this year. First, after they got up the trellis pretty good the deer found them and started some heavy munching on one end, working their way down the trellis.



So I put some netting over the beans and that made the biggest mess as the beans grew around and through that 1/2" mesh and I couldn't get to the beans inside the netting. In addition, the Japanese beetles just covered them. Good grief! At least the beans acted like a trap crop and the beetles left everything else alone. We ended up just cutting it all down as it was one giant fur ball of vines!

Considering the better luck with everything else in the garden, I'd say it was a pretty good year even though the two biggest failures were main crops. But the field peas and corn kind of made up for it.

Never a year goes by that the garden doesn't teach some lessons. I try to be a good student and not be an example of the old adage about insanity being doing something over and over again the same way and expecting different results so the next summary will highlight some of those lessons.
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Default Season Summary - Part 4: Lessons Learned

Sometimes lessons are learned through failures but hopefully through observations or just plain thinking about stuff while hands are busy weeding or occupied with other mundane garden chores. Some things I learned:

Planting brassicas here in February works BUT I need to be prepared to cover them now and then. I lost the first round of broccoli plants when they were young because I got lazy, didn’t watch the forecast closely enough and the “cooler temps” turned into a heavy frost. The plants got blasted, died and I had to start more.



No more winter squash will be grown here except for spaghetti squash which does super well and the vine borers don’t seem to mess with it. But they mess with all the others and even if some winter squash make it and produce, the squash have no flavor. I do not have a climate conducive to making good winter squash.

The Small Sugar Pumpkins had rambunctious vines and made nice fruit but it was rather tasteless.




Plums and peaches have to have their fruit thinned and protected from deer.

I will still grow lettuce in window boxes but it will only be a romaine type like Little Gem because the romaines are crisp. To me, these pretty leaf lettuce blends are wimpy and tasteless.



The biggest lesson learned was probably not to grow just one plant each of assorted tomato varieties and expect to have a lot ready at once for canning. I had fifteen tomato plants, all different varieties and you’d think there would be a ton of tomatoes to can. Not so. Lots of re-thinking to do about sun exposure, dealing with disease developing on picked tomatoes and concentrating half of those 15 tomato plants among possibly just two varieties for canning, the rest for whatever.

After all these years there's still lots to learn!
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