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Old 11-16-2019, 06:18 AM
RobertSWMissouri RobertSWMissouri is offline
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I like NO PROBLEMS fruit: JuJube, One of the easiest to grow fruits... https://aggie-horticulture.tamu.edu/...sheets/jujube/ We sampled many different one's at Powell Gardens East of Kansas City this fall, some are good for fresh eating, some only for drying / cooking. We just panted both.

If the wife really likes them, you may consider a Zone 6 hardy (FEW) Pommagranet for outdoors...
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Old 11-16-2019, 07:41 AM
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I like NO PROBLEMS fruit: JuJube, One of the easiest to grow fruits... https://aggie-horticulture.tamu.edu/...sheets/jujube/ We sampled many different one's at Powell Gardens East of Kansas City this fall, some are good for fresh eating, some only for drying / cooking. We just panted both.

If the wife really likes them, you may consider a Zone 6 hardy (FEW) Pommagranet for outdoors...
My wife love Pommes, and we grew them in the desert. I had planned to grow several dwarf pommes in a greenhouse, because I do not know how cold hardy a zone 6 really is.

My area is rated either zone 7 or zone 6b, depending on the map. But we have gotten below zero temps before.

Another good question to ask the ag extension agent.
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Old 11-16-2019, 02:36 PM
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as your looking /planning don't forget micro climates, where it might not make it exposed to everything a south side of a building could make it easy to keep it a zone warmer

I planted butter nuts here in northern Minnesota, a good two zones out of its range, the ones close to and south of spruce trees have grown bigger by not having the tree exposed to the winter as much

as a cheaper way to get apples plant the seeds out of any apple you can get ,the chances of getting a good eating apple I read at one time was 1 in 100,but in all honesty it don't matter , even the smallest most tart apple out there will be devoured by animals of some sort from deer to pigs[a crop to fatten pigs on or draw game], and any you can use for jellies or if a bit bigger/sweeter you can make cider
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Old 11-16-2019, 05:28 PM
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as your looking /planning don't forget micro climates, where it might not make it exposed to everything a south side of a building could make it easy to keep it a zone warmer

I planted butter nuts here in northern Minnesota, a good two zones out of its range, the ones close to and south of spruce trees have grown bigger by not having the tree exposed to the winter as much

as a cheaper way to get apples plant the seeds out of any apple you can get ,the chances of getting a good eating apple I read at one time was 1 in 100,but in all honesty it don't matter , even the smallest most tart apple out there will be devoured by animals of some sort from deer to pigs[a crop to fatten pigs on or draw game], and any you can use for jellies or if a bit bigger/sweeter you can make cider
About planting apples for animals. If you are setting up a food plot yes go for feeding the animals. Cider apples generally used to be planted from seed. I do not know if the seeds from modern apples work well for that. Cider apples is what johnyapple seed was planting as a business and there could be an occasional decent apple that might come out of the bunch as you describe.
My suggestion is go ahead plant the seeds and then graft the seedlings that come up with something that is a good apple.
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Old 11-16-2019, 08:03 PM
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My wife love Pommes, and we grew them in the desert. I had planned to grow several dwarf pommes in a greenhouse, because I do not know how cold hardy a zone 6 really is.

My area is rated either zone 7 or zone 6b, depending on the map. But we have gotten below zero temps before.

Another good question to ask the ag extension agent.
I have a friend down there with pomegranates. They will survive and produce.


I finally got a start and will see if they survive up here.
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Old 12-17-2019, 10:44 AM
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I spent some time planning, and now have trees on order, here is the plan.
1) Garden area is a 80'x120' relatively flat area I can easily fence from deer. Close to hose bib, and has space for tool shed and greenhouse.
2) Also have a 80'x120' gently sloped area with room for 32 fruit trees. Starting with (8). Will fence this area also.
3) I Iaid out area for (12) very large nut trees, starting with (9).
4) Plan to clear an additional 1 acre area along a seasonal creek and planting food trees to attract deer.

Here is what is currently on order,
Nut trees, (3) Dustan blight resistant Chestnuts, (6) Grafted Pecans; (2) Kanza, (2) Peruque, (2) Stewart.
Fruit trees, (3) Apple (Crab, Gala, Honeycrisp), Kieffer Pear, Elbeta Peach, Stella Cherrie, Asian Pear, Pomegranet, Pawpaw.
Deer Food Trees, (8) ea Shumard Oak, Osage Orange, Sand Plum, Persimmon, Hardy Native Pecan.
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Old 12-17-2019, 01:04 PM
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I have a friend down there with pomegranates. They will survive and produce.


I finally got a start and will see if they survive up here.
I ordered a Utah sweet Pom. It is l hardy to zone 6.
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Old 12-17-2019, 02:05 PM
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I spent some time planning, and now have trees on order, here is the plan.
1) Garden area is a 80'x120' relatively flat area I can easily fence from deer. Close to hose bib, and has space for tool shed and greenhouse.
2) Also have a 80'x120' gently sloped area with room for 32 fruit trees. Starting with (8). Will fence this area also.
3) I Iaid out area for (12) very large nut trees, starting with (9).
4) Plan to clear an additional 1 acre area along a seasonal creek and planting food trees to attract deer.

Here is what is currently on order,
Nut trees, (3) Dustan blight resistant Chestnuts, (6) Grafted Pecans; (2) Kanza, (2) Peruque, (2) Stewart.
Fruit trees, (3) Apple (Crab, Gala, Honeycrisp), Kieffer Pear, Elbeta Peach, Stella Cherrie, Asian Pear, Pomegranet, Pawpaw.
Deer Food Trees, (8) ea Shumard Oak, Osage Orange, Sand Plum, Persimmon, Hardy Native Pecan.
A single stella will work
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Pollination of Stella cherry trees. Your Stella cherry tree is in flowering group 4. It is self-fertile and does not need a pollination partner, but fruiting will usually be improved if there is a compatible partner of a different variety nearby.
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Old 12-19-2019, 05:02 PM
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Just bought 25 small American chestnut trees. Not a bad price at under $4.50 each shipped and with tax.
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Old 12-19-2019, 06:42 PM
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Just bought 25 small American chestnut trees. Not a bad price at under $4.50 each shipped and with tax.
How good are they with blight?
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Old 12-20-2019, 08:27 AM
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How good are they with blight?
I honestly am not sure. Since they survived I figure they have to be at least somewhat tolerant. I don’t have perfect ground and out of seven 6-12” three have survived 3 years and are in the 18-24” range. I am planting more in better areas (taking the place of where I would normally plant fruit trees) and actually amend the soil and properly prep the ground. The previous plantings I just spaded the soil and stuck in the root in a wooded section of the property. I was still recovering from being pretty sick and didn’t have the energy to do it then.

Edit: just checked the website out again and they claim that these are not blight resistant and not a hybrid.
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Old 12-20-2019, 08:59 AM
Major Mjolnir Major Mjolnir is offline
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...Edit: just checked the website out again and they claim that these are not blight resistant and not a hybrid.
I've never grown any but my understanding is that the blight usually doesn't appear till somewhere around age 6 -7. There are treatment methods for lesions at lower heights but apparently as the tree grows larger it becomes too labor intensive or costly to maintain.
While a person may not ever get chestnuts the trees are among the fastest growing and most prolific root sprouting trees in the forest and might make a good candidate for a coppiced wood supply.
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Old 12-20-2019, 11:06 AM
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I honestly am not sure. Since they survived I figure they have to be at least somewhat tolerant. I don’t have perfect ground and out of seven 6-12” three have survived 3 years and are in the 18-24” range. I am planting more in better areas (taking the place of where I would normally plant fruit trees) and actually amend the soil and properly prep the ground. The previous plantings I just spaded the soil and stuck in the root in a wooded section of the property. I was still recovering from being pretty sick and didn’t have the energy to do it then.

Edit: just checked the website out again and they claim that these are not blight resistant and not a hybrid.
I have been shopping for several types of nut treees, including chestnuts. Most chestnut trees offered for sale are not American chestnuts, they are Chinese chestnuts. They are resistent to chestnut blight.

The other variety of chestnut available is the Dustan Chestnut, which is an American crossed with a Chinese chestnut. They are very fast growing and very resistant. http://www.chestnuthilltreefarm.com/...tnut-Tree.aspx

Your chestnuts should grow well and produce nuts. They may not grow as tall as the old American trees did, but no pure blood American trees survive to maturity any more.
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Old 12-20-2019, 12:48 PM
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I have been shopping for several types of nut treees, including chestnuts. Most chestnut trees offered for sale are not American chestnuts, they are Chinese chestnuts. They are resistent to chestnut blight.

The other variety of chestnut available is the Dustan Chestnut, which is an American crossed with a Chinese chestnut. They are very fast growing and very resistant. http://www.chestnuthilltreefarm.com/...tnut-Tree.aspx

Your chestnuts should grow well and produce nuts. They may not grow as tall as the old American trees did, but no pure blood American trees survive to maturity any more.
I have three dunstans and found if you want chestnuts, the trees do require sunlight and so I took down a bunch larger oaks did finally get some nut this year. This spring I plan to take out some more. The only care that I do is to occasionally mow under the trees.
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Old 12-22-2019, 12:10 PM
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Just found this thread on Hick's fruit tree s. I will be planting in zone 8b in 2021. I have been doing my research now. Just wondered what all of yall think about the growth claims of the "planting by the blueprint" method. It may be called the Ellen white method I think.
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Old 12-23-2019, 05:20 AM
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Just found this thread on Hick's fruit tree s. I will be planting in zone 8b in 2021. I have been doing my research now. Just wondered what all of yall think about the growth claims of the "planting by the blueprint" method. It may be called the Ellen white method I think.
Never tried it but it looks as if it would be a ton of work. 'Proving' that a given method works better than others requires multiple large scale trials including control groups over a significant period of time, especially if you are working with trees. If you believe in it go for it.
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Old 12-23-2019, 08:20 AM
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Never tried it but it looks as if it would be a ton of work. 'Proving' that a given method works better than others requires multiple large scale trials including control groups over a significant period of time, especially if you are working with trees. If you believe in it go for it.
I live on a slope that is covered by a clayey sandy loom to about 18-28 inches. To go deeper required a pick to get through red-yellow clay full of iron stone and gravel.
For proper drainage one just makes sure the spot is not a dip that will stay saturated. We average 60 inches of annual rain fall. If the area is a dip bring in material and build it up. Continually saturated roots will kill most fruit trees. Paw paw and perhaps mayhaw will be more resistant to such conditions.
We do get droughts that will kill newly planted trees, but not kill trees that have finally become establish since the underlying clay is generally always wet.
The local pines will send a central tap root down 4 plus feet directly into the clay. Gives them good anchorage during hurricanes when they get bent over parallel to the ground. i am zone 8b NWFL
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Old 12-23-2019, 08:59 AM
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I live on a slope that is covered by a clayey sandy loom to about 18-28 inches. To go deeper required a pick to get through red-yellow clay full of iron stone and gravel.
For proper drainage one just makes sure the spot is not a dip that will stay saturated. We average 60 inches of annual rain fall. If the area is a dip bring in material and build it up. Continually saturated roots will kill most fruit trees. Paw paw and perhaps mayhaw will be more resistant to such conditions.
We do get droughts that will kill newly planted trees, but not kill trees that have finally become establish since the underlying clay is generally always wet.
The local pines will send a central tap root down 4 plus feet directly into the clay. Gives them good anchorage during hurricanes when they get bent over parallel to the ground. i am zone 8b NWFL
The site I cleared for my orchard is also on a north facing slope, and my soil type is a thin layer of humus, on top of clay-loam. There is significant water running in between the soil layers.

I plan to dig a 6x6x6 ft hole for each tree with my backhoe, mixing the clay with composted hay and horse crap. Once the trees push their tap roots down to the bottom of the disterbed soil, they should be very resistant to drought.
Edit, planting instructions for my Dunstant Chestnuts do not recommend adding compost below surface. It tends to trap moisture near the roots.

Our rainfall is variable here. Average is 45-50 inches, but kast yr we got 80", and in a recent dry year we got 30".
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Old 12-23-2019, 04:18 PM
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The site I cleared for my orchard is also on a north facing slope, and my soil type is a thin layer of humus, on top of clay-loam. There is significant water running in between the soil layers.

I plan to dig a 6x6x6 ft hole for each tree with my backhoe, mixing the clay with composted hay and horse crap. Once the trees push their tap roots down to the bottom of the disterbed soil, they should be very resistant to drought.
Edit, planting instructions for my Dunstant Chestnuts do not recommend adding compost below surface. It tends to trap moisture near the roots.

Our rainfall is variable here. Average is 45-50 inches, but kast yr we got 80", and in a recent dry year we got 30".
That is a lot of work and it is yours to do for sure. Good luck with it and would be nice if you would come back in five years to let us know how it worked out.
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Old 12-23-2019, 07:43 PM
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Originally Posted by Hick Industries View Post
The site I cleared for my orchard is also on a north facing slope, and my soil type is a thin layer of humus, on top of clay-loam. There is significant water running in between the soil layers.

I plan to dig a 6x6x6 ft hole for each tree with my backhoe, mixing the clay with composted hay and horse crap. Once the trees push their tap roots down to the bottom of the disterbed soil, they should be very resistant to drought.
Edit, planting instructions for my Dunstant Chestnuts do not recommend adding compost below surface. It tends to trap moisture near the roots.

Our rainfall is variable here. Average is 45-50 inches, but kast yr we got 80", and in a recent dry year we got 30".
I planted some old heirloom variety of plums this year with good results even in near straight sand by doing that. Holes were about 4x4x4, 12 bags of peat mixed with topsoil. Trees grew very well and minimal watering.
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