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Old 11-14-2019, 11:30 PM
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Do NOT dump 2 bags of old chips into the wood stove and then close the door.... With the air vent mostly closed.

Had a minor "explosion" that send me reaching for the nearest fire extinguisher!

Didn't need it, but all that oil in the chips made me wonder if I had a chimney fire for a hot minute!


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Old 11-15-2019, 02:23 AM
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Well then, do not burn mostly green wood for a couple months and then use some recently acquired dried out scraps of lumber in the wood stove. I wasn't here but I was told by the adult kids that the top plate on the stove and the bottom portion of the chimney had a slight glow to them while the chimney was popping and whizzing. It cleaned the chimney out and no problems since, but I guess the extra investment in the way better chimney pipe paid off on that particular evening.
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Old 11-15-2019, 09:24 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Nomad, 2nd View Post
Do NOT dump 2 bags of old chips into the wood stove and then close the door.... With the air vent mostly closed.

Had a minor "explosion" that send me reaching for the nearest fire extinguisher!

Didn't need it, but all that oil in the chips made me wonder if I had a chimney fire for a hot minute!


I'm awake now.
pretty sure I know what happened.
Those little air vents do not let in enough air for a large fire. So the fire can actually go out. The wood is still hot and above kindling temperature, just no flame due to low O2 concentration.

then, with flame stopped, the stove full of gas from the hot wood, after a few moments, enough air gets in there to ignite again. BAROOM!

Solution for me was to keep the door cracked open a tad. Super clean burn, before that, the chimney smoke was pretty nasty. Buring this way, you barely could even see chimney smoke. The door operating lever was designed to hold the door securely in the slightly open position.
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Old 11-15-2019, 09:38 AM
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Originally Posted by Justme11 View Post
pretty sure I know what happened.
Those little air vents do not let in enough air for a large fire. So the fire can actually go out. The wood is still hot and above kindling temperature, just no flame due to low O2 concentration.

then, with flame stopped, the stove full of gas from the hot wood, after a few moments, enough air gets in there to ignite again. BAROOM!

Solution for me was to keep the door cracked open a tad. Super clean burn, before that, the chimney smoke was pretty nasty. Buring this way, you barely could even see chimney smoke. The door operating lever was designed to hold the door securely in the slightly open position.
I tend to limit the air resulting in a lot of chimney soot-creosote and regularly clean the system.
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Old 11-15-2019, 09:51 AM
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I tend to limit the air resulting in a lot of chimney soot-creosote and regularly clean the system.
I never had luck with that, but I keep hearing about those that do. They have longer lasting fires that continue to burn through the night.

my way, the wood is gone after 4 hours or so. Nothing left but ash. So I would need to make another fire at 3 am or whatever, or else just accept the house would be 58 degrees in the morning, which is what I settled on. This would also give me the cold stove condition to remove the ashes. Then start a new fire quickly, and grab my coffee.

My woodstove was surrounded by several tons of stone, so more copious heat output would get stored somewhat in that thermal mass. Whoever designed that house had a fair amount of knowledge.

That was my way of doing it. Their would be a small amount of glasslike char in the chimney when I would clean it in the spring. A little over half a 5 gal bucket.
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Old 11-15-2019, 11:05 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Nomad, 2nd View Post
... all that oil in the chips made me wonder if I had a chimney fire for a hot minute!
hmm,

were these oil-soaked woodchips?
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Old 11-15-2019, 11:13 AM
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hmm,

were these oil-soaked woodchips?
I think he meant old oily potato chips. Had to read the post twice to get the gist.
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Old 11-15-2019, 11:34 AM
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Had a bag of corn chips do the same thing. Flashed, lifted the lid settled down to a small greasy burn
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Old 11-15-2019, 12:35 PM
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We always burnt coal.
As a kid, I used to dump coal onto the hot coals. After a bit, the explosion happened. The stove would bounce and the whole house shook. That was the good ole days. Just boys being boys. My mother didn't think it was funny.
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Old 11-15-2019, 12:46 PM
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Had a bag of corn chips do the same thing. Flashed, lifted the lid settled down to a small greasy burn
This.

I wanted salsa last night, had one opened bag that was stale and one unopened bag that has gone rancid.

Not the first time I've burned old chips, but first time that's come together like that.
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Old 11-15-2019, 05:19 PM
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A few yrs back I bought the new old stock from a gunsmithing buisness. Lots of gun parts, three working guns (in pieces), and lots of old reloading components.

What not to do,
Do not dump several pounds of mixed, unmarked smokeless powder, and several boxes of primers, into your burn barrel, light the paper at the bottom, then turn your back.
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Old 11-15-2019, 06:35 PM
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There are sticks that you throw into the fire box and close it up and it smothers the fire. They are under $10. Never had to use one.
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Old 11-15-2019, 11:29 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Justme11 View Post
I never had luck with that, but I keep hearing about those that do. They have longer lasting fires that continue to burn through the night.

my way, the wood is gone after 4 hours or so. Nothing left but ash. So I would need to make another fire at 3 am or whatever, or else just accept the house would be 58 degrees in the morning, which is what I settled on. This would also give me the cold stove condition to remove the ashes. Then start a new fire quickly, and grab my coffee.

My woodstove was surrounded by several tons of stone, so more copious heat output would get stored somewhat in that thermal mass. Whoever designed that house had a fair amount of knowledge.

That was my way of doing it. Their would be a small amount of glasslike char in the chimney when I would clean it in the spring. A little over half a 5 gal bucket.
Use logs. If the wood is not fully seasoned and a little wet will help. Also good if there is a knot. A denser knot of live oak is good for this. You can also partially cover the log with ash. Seasoned split wood is difficult to keep burning all night and you get a fire that heats the stove red hot that is not good either and it can burn all of the wood in just a couple hours. I can have more than 50 lbs of wood in the stove.

I have a second barrel that acts as a heat exchanger and over 17 ft of metal chimney that allows the exhaust to cool resulting in creosote deposit.
I use a stove similar to below.

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