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Old 01-03-2016, 12:14 PM
tula1953r tula1953r is offline
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Not sure that the East Mountains are the best area, but that's where I am located and am doing just fine. Abundant wildlife,(rabbits,deer,an occasional bobcat, lion or bear on the property) well water,reliable springs nearby,and storm runoff,wild edibles,( pinion pines, cactus,etc) lots of resources in the very nearby national forest/Wilderness areas.
Neighbors are very like minded and fairly self sufficient. Some families in the area have roots pre 1776!
Land is reasonably priced.
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Old 12-26-2017, 09:25 AM
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I live in Las Vegas 6,500' where water has been an issue for a long time. The city draws its water from the Gallinas River which is small. The city and irrigation users have been at war for a long time.. I have a place in Rociada elevation 7,800 which is NW of Las Vegas. I have surface water rights as well sub surface water rights. My well is 250' in depth.
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Old 12-26-2017, 01:42 PM
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I shop in Las Vegas sometimes. I'm a couple hours north east of there. It's really dry here. When I head to Vegas I think how many days walk to each water source. The Folks on the Santa Fe trail did it, I can't even imagine.
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Old 01-11-2018, 06:24 PM
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I think overall, NM is a great state to survive SHTF just because we have such a relatively low population density relative to our massive size in acreage. We also are not subject to many of the potential natural disasters that could play a role in many parts of the US. I think my primary criteria (even above water) is the proximity to the 5 main population centers and the natural lines of drift (especially the Rio Grande, Pecos River, Interstates 25-40-and 10). Beyond that, I think ones skillset and resources come into play in solving potential problems (like water availability).

I have lived in 23 different towns in NM throughout my life (from corner to corner) and worked in every nook and cranny of the state. My homestead is in the Far-North Central mountains, and while I think my spot is ideal, there are certainly other regions that would make good BOL or homestead locations- even the southern desert portions if you go about it right and have the finances to create redundancies in your essential resources. I think the West side of the Gila would be a great place to make a go of things, Certainly a lot of the area surrounding the Sacramento's would work too. There is a lot of fertile mountain country in the north central between 550 to Farmington and I25 north to Raton that a person could make a go of.. Fence Lake is awful hard to get to if you're not there, and few folks would ever think to head that direction from anywhere, but the folks in that region could certainly make a go of things if SHTF.
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Old 01-15-2018, 07:43 AM
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I hear Alamogordo has potential water problems also. Any truth to that?
I did a project for Bur Rec down there. NDRF - National Desalination Research Facility. The water in the Tularosa basin is plentiful- just saline. Kills crops & you can't drink it.
As far as I know they rely on surface water.
They ďstealĒ a lot of their water from the mountain springs around Cloudcroft and Sunspot. There are huge pipes running down the mountain and at the inspection sites there is chain link, barbed wire, and posted signs saying property of the city of Alamogordo.

I say if your community canít survive on its own water source, tough break!
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Old 02-12-2018, 04:26 PM
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I think overall, NM is a great state to survive SHTF just because we have such a relatively low population density relative to our massive size in acreage.
Population density can mean more than one thing. Socorro has a university, and locals. The difference is remarkable.

Before I came here I read that NM has the highest ratio of PhDs to population in America: 1 in 350. When you have met a hundred or so, you will understand that you can have a PhD and be dense at the same time.
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Old 02-12-2018, 04:43 PM
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A bunch of those Ph.d's are probably at the Los Alamos NL. Once my son and I drove NW out of Taos into the Carson NF. It seemed like a great place to bug out. However, I am not famialar with the water situation there.
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Old 02-12-2018, 05:01 PM
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They ďstealĒ a lot of their water from the mountain springs around Cloudcroft and Sunspot. There are huge pipes running down the mountain and at the inspection sites there is chain link, barbed wire, and posted signs saying property of the city of Alamogordo.

I say if your community canít survive on its own water source, tough break!
Preach it! For that matter if your State (California, Nevada) can't survive on it's own water, tough break. I think that's one of the most overlooked potential catalysts to a SHTF scenario breaking out in some regions. We got a hint of it recently when CA put a quota on water and all the rich people were trucking in water for their lawns- It's not that far removed from a scene where those water trucks would be for drinking, and there would be no lawns, or farms, or industry.

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Population density can mean more than one thing. Socorro has a university, and locals. The difference is remarkable.

Before I came here I read that NM has the highest ratio of PhDs to population in America: 1 in 350. When you have met a hundred or so, you will understand that you can have a PhD and be dense at the same time.
Having spent a fair amount of time in Academia myself, it's scarier than you even think. I think the autism spectrum provides a fitting illustration of the trade-offs that have to occur in a brain between social intelligence and academic capacity. (it's like the old adage, Fast, Cheap, Good- you can have two but never 3, the more of one you get, the less you can have of the others)
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Old 02-12-2018, 05:14 PM
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Originally Posted by PoorRichard05 View Post
A bunch of those Ph.d's are probably at the Los Alamos NL. Once my son and I drove NW out of Taos into the Carson NF. It seemed like a great place to bug out. However, I am not famialar with the water situation there.

Yes, Los Alamos has the densest population of PHD's in the world. Apart from LANL and our fair share of the standard university PhD's, we also have Sandia National Labs and WSMR which both have their own substantial herds of very special eggheads locked in secret rooms dreaming stuff up. I'd guess it is the sum of those Gov. activities that makes NM so PhD heavy relative to other states (per capita).
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Old 02-12-2018, 05:21 PM
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A bunch of those Ph.d's are probably at the Los Alamos NL. Once my son and I drove NW out of Taos into the Carson NF. It seemed like a great place to bug out. However, I am not famialar with the water situation there.
The Taos area has a lot of specific water issues including severe drought.
Additionally, you have to deal with the Pueblos and Land Grants and the Acequias to boot.
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Old 02-22-2018, 10:00 PM
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I have 15 acres in Rociada. Orchard, pasture, and timber; 1 hand dug well 25' and one well 250'; Plenty of wild game. The valley floor is at 7,800' elevation. We have grown a garden, pumpkins, carrots, peas, beans, corn, potatoes, and cabbage. I have an irrigations ditch. My point is there are properties in the mountain but you have to see if you have the elements for a good place to live. Some times the best of them require a 4x4 to get to them.
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Old 09-24-2018, 08:57 PM
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I have property in Rociada. Sunk well hit good water at 50'. I am higher up from the valley floor which is 7800'. Plums, apples and pears in my orchard, 8 acres of pasture and 10 acres of timber. A big plus is the irrigation ditch. Decent growing season and winters that are very cold some years.
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Old 10-01-2018, 06:11 AM
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[QUOTE=KeyserSoSay;17646969]
Preach it! For that matter if your State (California, Nevada) can't survive on it's own water, tough break. I think that's one of the most overlooked potential catalysts to a SHTF scenario breaking out in some regions. We got a hint of it recently when CA put a quota on water and all the rich people were trucking in water for their lawns- It's not that far removed from a scene where those water trucks would be for drinking, and there would be no lawns, or farms, or industry. [ENDQUOTE]

Water is the main concern for us on the mountain. Thankfully NM doesn’t restrict rainwater collection and we get plenty to keep the tanks full. I’ve heard some states like CA have laws against rainwater collection.
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Old 01-27-2019, 04:30 PM
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Water is really a huge downfall to NM in my opinion. I bought a small piece of property and a small amount of water rights. However, the property doesn't sit over an aquifer so there is no guarantee the well won't go dry (not that an aquifer is a guarantee), the well is pretty deep so solar to run the pump would be very expensive and when the generator is finally out of gas we will be screwed. There is also no guarantee that in the future I will be able to transfer those water rights to another property in the area.
Ok a well pump (Grundfos) runs on pretty much anything. 30 volts DC to 600 volts dc or 90 volts ac to 240 volts ac and does it flawlessly. 1 panel runs it if it is 30+ vdc. My well is 235', but the pump will pump much higher.

There are no "water rights" needed where I live, can't help you there.
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Old 03-25-2019, 12:07 PM
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Does anyone know much about mills canyon in Harding county? Iíve been looking in that area. Union county is too noisy with rvs,motorcycles, and tourist from March to October. I canít get a moment peace due to all the dang traffic in town.
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Old 03-27-2019, 08:54 PM
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Does anyone know much about mills canyon in Harding county? Iíve been looking in that area. Union county is too noisy with rvs,motorcycles, and tourist from March to October. I canít get a moment peace due to all the dang traffic in town.
This area falls into the category of spots I mentioned in my previous post, with the same caveat: you could absolutely make a go if it in that country for the long-term, but you must be careful to arrive with the (financial) resources to fully address the restricticted resources you would face- like water. What I see a lot of is folks striking out and struggling because they didnít have redundant ( i.e. expensive) infrastructure to provide necessities- If you canít irrigate during good times, you wonít be able to do so at SHTF, and if you canít irrigate enough land to feed yourself and your livestock, you will struggle and eventually need to bug out.... Is the guideline Iíd suggest.
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Old 04-01-2019, 02:53 PM
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This area falls into the category of spots I mentioned in my previous post, with the same caveat: you could absolutely make a go if it in that country for the long-term, but you must be careful to arrive with the (financial) resources to fully address the restricticted resources you would face- like water. What I see a lot of is folks striking out and struggling because they didnít have redundant ( i.e. expensive) infrastructure to provide necessities- If you canít irrigate during good times, you wonít be able to do so at SHTF, and if you canít irrigate enough land to feed yourself and your livestock, you will struggle and eventually need to bug out.... Is the guideline Iíd suggest.
Yeah, the spot am thinking of doesnt have a well. It has Canadian river frontage but they arenít sure about water rights. Iím 80 miles from there right now. Ther3 are just too many people through union county from spring to fall....to many tourist and too much racket.
Iíve become a curmudgeon I guess.
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Old 04-01-2019, 06:24 PM
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The Southwest has ongoing issues with water. I have been following a couple of people who have property around Benson, Arizona (a few miles out of Tucson), who have developed water catchment systems on their properties. It may be one solution for water access.
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Old 04-02-2019, 11:37 AM
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Yeah, the spot am thinking of doesnt have a well. It has Canadian river frontage but they aren’t sure about water rights. I’m 80 miles from there right now. Ther3 are just too many people through union county from spring to fall....to many tourist and too much racket.
I’ve become a curmudgeon I guess.
We're so spoiled in NM- here you are complaining about all the tourists in Union County- no way that there has ever been more than 6,000 people in that county at the same time. I'm in ABQ today, I see that many people out of every window of my car. Good stuff up there in the NE corner though, I'd take just about any ranch out there with good water.

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The Southwest has ongoing issues with water. I have been following a couple of people who have property around Benson, Arizona (a few miles out of Tucson), who have developed water catchment systems on their properties. It may be one solution for water access.

Indeed- and the issue with water is just going to get worse for all of the West in the coming years and decades. Our property has two ponds that catch about 1 acre/feet/year during runoff, we have two wells- (soon to be three with a large deep irrigation well to be installed), and we have rain catchment that collects 6,500 gallons, (about to be upgraded to 10,000 gallons. I'll eventually be installing another 20,000 gallon steel tank that will gravity feed the entire property. We have a major river within 3 miles, and a major reservoir within 15 miles. My point before is that this type of stuff can potentially take a lot of money to make a property secure and resourceful, and I advise folks to think hard about how much investment would be needed to make a property function grid-down WROL, or even function as you'd hope in modern times. (Watch "Homestead Rescue" if you get that channel)


On the flipside, we've been working on our place for 30 years, and I'm just now in a financial spot to make it self sufficient- ABL- Always Buy Land.
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Old 07-07-2019, 06:24 PM
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San Juan County.

2/3 of the surface water in the State flows through there. Navajo Dam supplies all the water needed for the crops of the Navajo Irrigation Project farms. There is an abundance of coal, natural gas, and oil. There is a hydro-generation plant located at Navajo Dam that is owned by the City of Farmington. It's moderately populated and strategically located away from troublesome population centers.
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