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Old 11-08-2019, 12:43 AM
LindaLou LindaLou is offline
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Canned apples


After trying new recipes for canning apples, I still had enough left over to get back to basics: good ol' canned apples. Managed to fill these 3 quarts. Each seal was a success so yahoo!
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Old 11-10-2019, 10:37 AM
goat daddy goat daddy is offline
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OK, we need some help. We bought a package of mixed winter squash seeds as well as hubbard. Had a great crop. Removed squash from vines, let them cure and last night we cooked one. Some kind of round squash like acorn. the issue was cutting the rind. I'm thinking of getting out the meat saw. One site said to drop hubbard squash on the floor and break it as the rind was so hard? The butternut squash we normally grow doesn't have a rind that hard
How do you cut squash? We did put the squash on the grill with butter and baked it a half hour before we put the meat on the BBQ and the squash was great
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Old 11-10-2019, 05:15 PM
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Reciprocal saw? Hammer a machete through it?
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Old 11-10-2019, 07:53 PM
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Don’t mess around. Go grab the chain saw! On a serious note, I use a machete to split my squash. Four out of five of them are for the chickens but it works just fine for those headed to the oven, as well. You don’t want too thick of a knife if you go that route but you also need something sturdy enough to stay straight...
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Old 11-10-2019, 10:03 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by goat daddy View Post
How do you cut squash?
I have a fairly heavy chef's knife that I use, I used it to carve up a delicata squash this weekend, in fact.

The squash pieces were roasted along with potato cubes and onion wedges, it all tasted great.
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Old 11-12-2019, 12:08 AM
KBee KBee is offline
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A chef's knife works fine for the winter squash that we grow. I tried a blue hubbard one season and it did have a very hard rind. I didn't think the amount of usable squash and the flavor were worth the extra trouble.
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Old 11-16-2019, 03:20 PM
LindaLou LindaLou is offline
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Put up 4 - 1/2 pints of Apple Maple Jam. They'll make good Christmas presents !


.

Last edited by LindaLou; 11-16-2019 at 03:21 PM.. Reason: spelling
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Old 11-16-2019, 10:01 PM
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Just today I was doing a final inventory of this year's take from my garden:

~3 dozen jars of pickles; a mix of slices, spears and whole.
3 large freezer bags of peppers, various types
1 large freezer bag of mostly paste tomatoes
1 large freezer bag of okra, already sliced (this was a very bad year for okra)

The peppers and tomatoes will go into various soups or stews this winter. Maybe some of the okra too, but that can also be roasted separately.

Need to start working through the pickles too, although there have been some requests for those as Christmas gifts.
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Old 11-17-2019, 05:34 AM
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Broccoli! This is the first head of 'Packman', a nice 7" across. Half will go into broccoli salad today and half will be steamed later.

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Old 11-22-2019, 09:16 AM
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Harvested my Piper Nigrum (Black Pepper) for the first time. I learned that it can be grown in a pot outdoors in zone 9. It takes a few years for the plant to mature. I also learned to not soak it too long before dehydrating. I'm satisfied with the result.
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Old 11-27-2019, 07:21 PM
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juiced pomegranates and made jelly.16 pts. I have enough to do 32 more pints. I may just can juice? Snow has mostly stopped everything in the garden
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Old 11-27-2019, 11:18 PM
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"Harvested" one of the turkeys for Thanksgiving dinner tomorrow. Cooking down the carcass for stock/broth, which will end up being canned.
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Old 11-28-2019, 08:17 AM
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One more head of broccoli, half of which has been converted to broccoli salad for today's dinner. There are two more ready to cut and I will use one of them tomorrow to play with blanching and tray freezing. It's been ages since I tried freezing broccoli and wasn't happy with the results then. I've learned a lot about freezing veggies in the years since then so maybe it will be lots better this time.
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Old 12-01-2019, 12:48 PM
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Before lunch I puttered a tad in the garden and found some radishes ready. Very mild and despite the size of a few, they're solid in the middle and not pithy. Yay! Varieties are 'Opolanka' (a Polish variety) and 'French Breakfast'. I tried them side by side last year and didn't see much difference in the two. They grow, look and taste alike. The last bunch went into kimchee and these will be added to salads.

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Old 12-01-2019, 04:26 PM
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Late this afternoon I got to thinking about how the turnips were coming along so I checked. There were six ready to go, the first ones this fall. The greens were especially nice with no flea beetle holes at all. I'm amazed. Greens and turnips will be part of lunch tomorrow.

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Old 12-05-2019, 02:31 PM
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I'm done canning. 60 jars of Pomegranate jelly. Mostly 8 oz jelly jars, but I ran out and found 6 1/2 jelly jars then switched to pint jars. Not enough to make a complete batch with the left over juice so I added some store bought cherry juice and made 3 more pints. That should be a 5 year supply. When we moved here 9 years ago the pomegranate tree was 3" tall. I bought another off the mark down rack at walmart. Both are 6' tall now and 4' wide. I'll be looking for ideas next year. deer got most of our fruit crop this year
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Old 12-06-2019, 04:32 PM
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Took 24 Satsuma oranges, 12 Meyer's lemon to family over Thanksgiving. Have about 25 more Satsumas to harvest, and about 60 more Meyer's lemons.
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Old 12-06-2019, 04:58 PM
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I pulled a bag of frozen corn on the cob out of the freezer. Also pulled some fried chicken for trip to the cabin and about 3 pounds of pork roast to put in the crock pot when I get back. This spring when we eat the veggies in the freezer it will be time for a defrost.
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Old 12-07-2019, 07:31 PM
LindaLou LindaLou is offline
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Satsuma

Citrus is in full production. Satsuma have been distributed to neighbors and family. I might miss a snowy white Christmas season like we used to have in Michigan but Texas' citrus season makes up for it
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Old 12-09-2019, 01:54 PM
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I am beginning to pick in earnest on my Nov-transplants of Florida Giant mustard (and it is HUGE) and bok choy, picking the outer leaves only leaving the rest to grow in again. They both work well as cut and come again vegetables. I am dehydrating the mustard greens as I am the only one that eats them, and this will make them readily available to add to stir fries, soups and for creaming with minimal re-hydration. I need to save freezer space and canning jars for foods that everyone eats.
The bok choy I will primarily freeze, as everybody likes it in stir fries. The hard part is not eating the juicy stems right in the garden like celery stalks!
Collards are almost picking size, again the outer leaves only. That way I can pick til springtime temps make it bolt. I do this with my kale as well. Green onions are approaching picking size also.
I planted radishes and lettuce the 3rd week in November, they are coming up nicely. Radishes are particularly sweet when grown in cooler weather, and the lettuce grows more slowly but is particularly welcome fresh as it matures. I am pleased with the Winter King cabbage, it is already starting to make heads. It is a red-tinged, heavily savoyed cultivar, more cold tolerant than smoother cabbages. The broccoli is growing, but more slowly than usual. The spinach is also coming up more slowly, but spinach is a slow germinator anyway, as are the kohlrabi seeds. I am interested to see if the carrot seeds sprout - the carrots we over-wintered last year grew in curiously flat rosettes, rather than sticking up as usual, and were not as orange as warm season carrots. Those were planted in late summer and matured over the winter. We are experimenting to see if the seeds will sprout in cooler temperatures.

So, to sum up - we are picking our transplants of mustard, kale, and bok choy, soon we will be adding collard greens. Lettuce & radishes are uo and progressing nicely; broccoli seems to be pouting and dragging its feet as far as production. Last year it overwintered, then made 'heads' in early spring all at once.

Now we are planning when to start tomato transplants & how to shelter them from the sun so they survive our 100 degree summer days. We have located several Florida cultivars that look promising, and may well end up relying on determinate kinds to get a good harvest all at once before the heat really starts cooking.

It is strange (but interesting) re-learning how to garden after moving from zone 4 to zone 8!
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berry, celery, dewberry, edible landscape, garden, greens, harvest, herbs, kale, mushrooms, onion, pickles, preserve food, radish, snap peas, snow peas, spring, strawberries, winter



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