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Old 06-17-2019, 10:20 PM
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What you're calling a barn is starting to look like a rugged built master crafted mini mansion. With all the archetitecture design, welding, carpentry, masonry and electrician work are; a master of all trades.... and there's the plumbing. I have no doubt you have it all figured out or will. Your plan, your schedule, and your budget. A thumbs up and best wishes. Please keep sharing.
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Old 06-18-2019, 02:45 PM
fordtrucksforever fordtrucksforever is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by EventHorizon View Post
What you're calling a barn is starting to look like a rugged built master crafted mini mansion. With all the architecture design, welding, carpentry, masonry and electrician work are; a master of all trades.... and there's the plumbing. I have no doubt you have it all figured out or will. Your plan, your schedule, and your budget. A thumbs up and best wishes. Please keep sharing.
Wow! Thanks for the compliments and encouragement. Extremely motivating and inspiring. I had to include the quote just so it gets posted again.

BTW thats Jack of all trades, master of none...But plumbing is a non issue. Just labor intensive. Very minor in the overall scheme of things.
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Old 06-21-2019, 12:03 AM
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After watching paint dry, err glue, I finally finished the first corner cabinet. Extremely happy with the results. If building cabinets for a living, I would find a different profession. For me personally, I dont have a problem with small imperfections. You redo it or live with it and just move on. It would be difficult to not redo until I was happy, if for a customer. Not that the minor issues would ever be noticed, but they would be known by me.

After getting this corner box built, it needed the oak face. Then had to figure out what to do for a door, using existing donor pieces.



Using demo'ed scraps has its downsides. I had to clean up a lot of these planks to make them usable. Also so they will take paint. The insides will go back white. I chose to go with one single height shelf instead of staggering them like in previous post.



You can see how simple the cabinets actually are. This front is all that will be seen on most of them. So the front gets the finish materials. Here you can see the two stiles(vertical pieces on cabinet ends) and the first rail(horizontal strip) that is partially stained from donor cabinet.



The face is done. Now ready for sanding, stain, then final clear coat finish.



This is what I was hoping would work out. It took most of the time getting saw to cut a true 45 degrees so both doors would fit together. Next thing I had to do was add that thin strip to get wide enough so the opening was covered. When it is stained to match no one would know the door wasnt made this way originally.



I was so glad all the effort I put into making this door actually worked as had planned(lots of hope). Everything fits flat and square.




You can see where the hinges used to be when only a single flat door. With the corner door like this, gives more access to inside of cabinet. Otherwise with a divider and two narrow doors, limits how useful and convenient the storage area would be.

Time for the next cabinet to get built.
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Old 06-22-2019, 04:18 PM
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This next cabinet box was a simple 2 ft square that fills in between the range top and corner cabinet. It went fairly quickly. So last nights efforts ended with a nice addition to the kitchen project.



Most of the face was donor pieces removed from old cabinets and cut down to size. So you can see a lot of the existing finish shows. If I decide to go with a lighter stain for cabinet to contrast against the darker doors, will have to figure out how to remove the old stain in several places on the cabinets.

This finishes one wall for the lower cabinets. Now I can take these with the new appliances down to cabin and get them ready to install.
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Old 06-27-2019, 08:51 PM
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Trying to stay ahead of things as the cabin comes together. Since some of the kitchen cabinets are ready to be test fit before installing, got me to thinking. I was fortunate to acquire a dumpster load of scrap granite, marble and quartz, so that is what my counter tops will be. No ifs ands or buts. Either one, or made from all three choices. I was taking a quick inventory of what there is the most of. Seems like my main choice of materials right now will be quartz. So quartz is what it will be..for now.



This is what a lot from the last load looks like. Simple and clean.



What I want to try is cut the larger pieces to fit like a picture surrounded with a frame. Maybe use some long narrow pieces of granite for the picture frame. Actually can just use it for the outer edge. Since the back splash will cover up the other edge. So it can just be cut to roughly fit and covered over. Nothing particular about the granite type color or pattern, just used to border these quartz pieces. Everything will be fit and epoxied together with no grout lines. Just clean cut sections butted together. The bonding resin or epoxy can be easily color matched and not noticeable when finished.



There are a few pieces of granite like this one that could be used as contrast next to those white quartz sections.



This piece might work like next to the sink or where a chopping block would be used. Just as examples. When I get closer to cutting these pieces, will try laying them out and see what works. Mainly whatever gets the most coverage is the favorable way, unless something just looks really good if I try to be creative. But that isnt very likely for me.

Just got loaned a granite saw and router. With be test driving these to see if I can make them scraps in pics up there into a kitchen countertop. Wish me luck.
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Old 07-04-2019, 10:22 PM
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Got out for a short work day. It was a good day. My main reason for the trip was to deliver those kitchen cabinets and make sure they would fit like I was hoping. Aside from laborious and tedious work it took to load them in the truck and then having to unload, that effort was worth it.





Definitely not looking as much like a storage container from this view.

Cabinets still need to get sanded and stained so they all match. The fit is so much better that had been expected. It wont take too much to get them lined up and secured in place. Very little trimming to get it all done. This is only half of the lower cabinets that are going to be made. Since everything looks like it will work, I can focus on getting the rest of them built as time allows.

The next thing I had been putting off for a while is laying down plywood subfloor in the larger 12 x 20 added on room. The 14 gauge sheetmetal was fairly solid, but still sounded like a tag-team match taking place on Saturday Night Wrestling. Way too much bong bong walking across the floor

I ran across some roofing membrane. It is like tar paper, but more rubbery. One side is sticky to lay down on roof. The exposed side has fine granules for a non skid surface. This stuff usually lays down the same as tar paper. But the overlapped joints are sealed and become waterproof.



I rolled this out then peeling off the plastic layer, stuck down to steel floor. It seems like is going to work out great. A water, bug, vapor, barrier and seals out any air creeping in from underneath. Also works out well for sound deadening.



Next was to lay down some second hand 3/4" decking for my subfloor. These two sheets were the first that went down. I also got the last piece of sheetrock up on the right side of wall.



I picked up a box of #14 x 1-1/4 self drilling screws to secure plywood. Screws have to drill thru two layers of steel before drawing down tight. I was concerned that smaller diameter ones would either snap off or not able to drill thru. These screws did the job. I bought them cheap surplus for about a penny per screw.

After this decking was screwed down, the floor went from slightly noisy to extremely solid and no more bong bong. It is now just like a pier and beam house, except even more solid. Sandwiching the sheetmetal between plywood and structural beams underneath made it very solid. Originally I was unsure if this would be rigid enough. My other option was add a second layer of decking to get the solid feel I would then expect. Didnt want to go that route just from the extra expense for 10 more sheets of plywood.

Hope every patriotic American enjoys their Fourth of July. Even if it is just sitting on the front porch, just a swingin... watching the local fireworks.
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Old 07-15-2019, 02:21 AM
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I thought it was time to get another one of the cabinets built. This one is just like the other corner cabinet, except it holds a sink. I will change how the top is supported just a little so the sink will drop down in place.



This is new used lumber. Can you actually have that? Was used for a temporary repair then discarded. I ran the lengths of these thru the table saw to make sure they were all the same thickness, so would sit flat. This time I removed the back corner of frame, as seen here. It is cut across at a 45 degree angle. I actually cut the pieces to a 22.5 degree angle on each end to make a perfect fit. My wood working skills are improving....



Some of you may think this would be a total waste of your time. Just go buy a new piece of plywood, dumoss. Too much effort to scrape off the old laminate. I spent about an hour removing it from a 4x8 sheet of 3/4 plywood. It was a pita, but dont see any reason to throw away $60 for what I already have.



With just a little 3/4" wood chisel, and hammer I peeled and broke off all of this laminate. This stuff is jagged and sharp when broken. There are plenty of cuts on my fingers as a good argument against doing it. This one side has a layer of glue all over. But will be hidden when cabinets are installed. It will be on the blind sides of corner cabinet. When installed, you would never know there is dead dry glue all over it.



This is a mess I will have to clean up. The cost of using what free materials there is to build cabinets from. The other side of plywood is smooth with a nice grain pattern. It is A/B cabinet grade with one side finish sanded. Not really important using it as sides of a blind cabinet.



The base is now covered using another piece of that plywood that is still covered with laminate on one side. No reason to remove it since facing down. It measured about 13 inches wide, so I cut three pieces to do the full cover here.



I finally got wise and picked up this used worm drive circular saw. It puts the chinese clone of a regular saw to shame. No more binding or angled cuts on harder and denser wood. This is one tool I should have bought more than a few years ago. Lesson learned. Good tools give good results. Better tools give better results. Bad tools.......you get the idea.



The first cut made with the saw is all I needed to see to know it was definitely the right decision to buy. Cabinet plywood is very dense and hard to cut thru with the other saw. This worm drive went right thru like it was a soft piece of pine. No bind, veering off or especially cutting at an angle, because the base flexes so bad on that cheap saw.



The sides are glued and screwed(nailed), then clamped square. Watching glue dry is really boring. So decided to post this here while waiting. Besides my arms are sore and calling it good for the night.



From the back this is the inside of corner cabinet. Everything fits so much better when the cuts are straight and square. Not to mention actually measuring exactly to size. This will be the best fitting cabinet so far. I cant wait to see how it turns out in a few days when finished. It will also look more like a newly built unfinished cabinet since most of the wood has not been previously stained or painted.

Much as I dont like building cabinets, and would never do this type of work for a living, it is still enjoyable and rewarding to see the results of my labor, especially when put to use.

Initial cost to build this one cabinet is expensive, comparatively, since the others were basically nothing. I spent $73 on the worm drive Skil saw. It came with two carbide blades. I used the 40 tooth finish blade to cut that plywood. Since this saw works so much better, it will save time, and materials. No more scrap pieces from bad cuts. The cost will average out to be very negligible by the time I get finished with everything that relies on this saw.
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Old 07-20-2019, 06:21 PM
fordtrucksforever fordtrucksforever is offline
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A little farther along on this other corner cabinet. It will hold the sink, so was made a little different than the other cabinet previously built.



This is 1/4" oak paneling that was demo'ed from that house being remodeled. These are just pieces glued and nailed up with trim to look expensive. The material is almost useless, unless you happen to be building some kitchen cabinets from surplus and someone elses trash.....



The backs of upper cabinets and some of the lower ones have 1/4" paneling on wall side to close it in. Also good for added strength, if needed. I needed a little more strength for support on this one cabinet. After removing nails, scraping off Liquid Nails on the back side, mark where to cut, then end up having something that can be used here. This paneling gets lightly sanded so will hold paint when finished. It is only visible on the inside when doors are open, so not really an issue.



Looking thru the door opening one side is done here. Notice any difference after that light sanding?



Here is the back side that goes against wall. You see this opening that has been cut back and will have access to plumbing coming up thru floor in corner of container where cabinet sits.



From the top this cabinet does not have the cross bracing, which isnt really necessary. Just another way to build with some added strength.



Here is how the sink will fit. Now I just have to figure an easy way to cut that granite for an opening needed to drop sink down in...This sink is another retired and disposed of item. There are nicer neater and cooler ones out there, but considering the price, I like this one.

Time to make another one of those doors to cover front of the new cabinet. Hopefully this door will be a little easier to make than my first attempt on the last one.
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Old 08-13-2019, 03:06 PM
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Been a few weeks since I had the chance to work on my cabin. It is too far along to not finish or possibly loose interest. But is irritating when I cant get any work done. Some days I am sitting around waiting to load up and actually go work for income. But unable to bail for a few days in between and do anything on my cabin.

Last week I was doing my lowly data cable work at a store remodel. Most of these remodels require foundation to be trenched for electrical, plumbing and refrigeration. They cover the trench in 3/4 plywood temporarily. Some dumbass had purchased A/B cabinet grade plywood instead of the usual C/D common for decking/subflooring and general use.

I had mentioned how nice the plywood looked with such a nice finish. The foreman explained what had happened. Then asked if I had any use for them when they were done. The trenches had to be covered for one day then later would get filled with concrete. Two sheets were cut lengthwise and the others were left full size.

Naturally I said all of it could be put to use immediately. He said it was all going in the dumpster after that night. He would put them aside if I wanted to pick up the next day. Obviously I did not hesitate one second to take him up on the offer and pick these up.



There are two of these full size, 4x8 sheets. Then two more sheets cut lengthewise in half. That just happens to work out perfectly. I need the width for cabinets to be 23 1/4 inches. So just under 3/4 inch needs to be shaved off and I can finish building all of the lower cabinets with no waste of materials for kitchen. One full sheet will supply ends for three lower cabinets. There is enough salvagable lumber from those old cabinets that were torn out from a house to have everything I need to completely build these.

The upper cabinet sides will only be 11 inches wide. So plenty of materials for these too.

Moving on to other things related to my cabin. Last winter I resurrected a really clean looking Generac 5500 generator to have for any higher load power tools as needed.



I was really disappointed in how this unit performed when giving it a test run. Under any heavy loads, well within its capacity, was not very impressive. Actually very depressing. There was one thing I thought may be the problem.

The original issues of this generator was it not having any compression because the vales were carboned up so bad would not close. Really not hard buildup but just dry soot from running way too rich. I did a really nice valve job and it started right up and ran like was expected. Until I loaded it down. Then motor would labor really bad and stumble, not able to maintain the rpm to sustain a heavy load.

After looking over everything I had concluded(hypothesized) the problem was actually caused from choke valve. It was vibrating so much and fluttering under any load. With very little movement of the choke plate would really alter how the motor ran. The choke plate vibrating like it was seemed to be causing an overly rich condition. No black smoke, but too rich to run well.

Someone had previously worked on the carb and put choke plate in backwards. Also broke the shaft that retains that plate. Also referred to as the butterfly or shutter valve. I had fixed it, but still missing the spring detent that keeps the butterfly locked rigid when open.

It was cheaper to replace the whole carb than try to locate the broken and missing parts. So I finally bit the bullet and forked over $13.50.



For the amazing low low price of $13.50 which included shipping from china, I was the recipient all of these new parts. So doing nothing more but replace the old carb, this generator fired right up on second pull. No different than before. Well one main difference. When I loaded it down with a large circular saw and 4 1/2 angle grinder at the same time, motor did not labor at all.

Now I am not so dead set against everything that isnt Honda when related to small generators. The other off brand chinese models I have are still not very impressive considering what they claim as rated for. But this Generac has given me some hope.

My plans are still focused on selling all of the other chinese models I had repaired last year. Then use some of the money to replace that over priced module for one of the not running Honda EB3000c cycloconvertor generators that are just collecting dust.

For now I will keep using the small dinosaur Honda E1500 to run lights and A/C. Then fire up this Generac when using any heavy load power tools as needed. When the EB3000c is running, it will replace both of these other gens. More efficient on fuel consumption and a lot quieter. Looking forward to that for sure.

Sorry for not having much to report on. I am just about finished with all of the stores for this year. A few more weeks and should be completely done with them. There were 8 remodels for the year. They usually get strung out and way behind schedule. Always the hurry up and wait scenario that I really hate. The weekly schedule changes so much there is really no reason to even have one. Sure isnt reliable.

I shouldnt complain. It pays very well and the work isnt difficult for me to do. Being able to repurpose some of the demo'ed materials, and dig thru the dumpster occasionally really keeps me looking forward to the next job. Well up to a point anyway.

Thanks again for following this thread. It is inspiring and keeps me motivated to keep posting with updates as to the progress so far.
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Old 08-13-2019, 05:35 PM
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That's a great score on the plywood (jealous) and cool that the Genny is better.
Have you mentioned what you are going to use for counter Tops??
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Old 08-14-2019, 02:07 AM
fordtrucksforever fordtrucksforever is offline
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That's a great score on the plywood (jealous) and cool that the Genny is better.
Have you mentioned what you are going to use for counter Tops??
HERE

HERE
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Old 08-14-2019, 04:01 PM
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As far as generators go... I absolutely love our harbor freight Predator 3500 inverter generator. Gave ~$640 on sale.. it's insanely quiet (half as loud as my 2kw Onan).. sips fuel... electric start and fires on the first hit every time.

Found quite a few people with nearly 4k hours on them without a problem... one said his finally started using oil at 7k hours.

I've got 30 hours on mine (multiple oil changes to get all the crap left behind from Chinese manufacturing out of the case). Gonna switch it over to synthetic soon with a fresh NGK plug. Looking forward to many years out of it.

With all that said... Chinese carbs are hit/miss. Have bought multiple good ones but have been hit with a few bad ones out of the box too. If it works great for a few weeks.. it's likely good to go.
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Old 08-15-2019, 10:11 AM
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I am looking forward to ridding myself of the generic(not the Generac) chinese crap and will enjoy my first inverter type generator, that happens to be a Honda.

I would expect an inverter type to work much better. If you can get decent hours from a chinese one, thats a bonus.

I was given two extremely high mileage and used hard EB3000c Honda inverter generators. They both suffer from the module failing. Everything else checks out just fine. Unfortunately the replacement modules are $300. One is an early model and the other is much much newer. But the newer one is still nearly 20 years old. I expect to get a lot more years out of it once running again.

After my cabin has been officially connected to the grid, the remaining gens will be retired. Then have 100LL AV gas run thru carb, then drained and stored, ready for emergency use or any need for portable power in the future.
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Old 08-22-2019, 05:48 PM
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Finally, I am caught up on all of the jobs that have been running three months behind schedule. At least for the next few weeks, I am back to working on the cabin.

I got off the vampire work hours. Starting back to normal sleep at night. The daylight is like new to me again. So need to get out in the sunlight for a few hours and remember what it feels like.

Today I focused on that one upper corner cabinet for the kitchen. As my accumulation of surplus disposed of left over scrap plywood has increased in quality, this one cabinet is made out of what I would consider almost new materials.



First I cut three of these. Top, bottom and a middle shelf. That Skil worm drive saw is proving its worth with each cut.



This is the first time to cut at a 45 degree with Skil saw. Worked so very well with no deviation or binding. This will be the sides of corner cabinets. There will be two of these cabinets built, for right and left corners of kitchen.



You can see how this fits together for the angled face and door of cabinet front.



These sides were cut from one plywood piece that I had scraped the laminate off. Then washed off old dried glue with lacquer thinner which left a nice clean smooth grain, just like when new.



Just one more thing I should have bought sooner. It saves so much time over hammering nails in. This was on sale for $19.95. The 2 inch long nails were another $5 for 1000. This should be very useful throughout the build. Even tho there isnt too much use of wood, except for mainly these cbinets. But for base board and other trim, should be worth having.



Here is the cabinet coming together. Using that nail gun, takes only a few seconds to tack the pieces and end up with something like a cabinet. How cool is that? Hope I dont forget how to use a hammer...



This corner cabinet is a little more difficult with the stiles cut at a 45 degree angle. The angled edge has to match the other cabinets on each side. Some newish and some repurposed oak pieces used for the face. I used solid oak plank, instead of plywood for the front of this one cabinet.



The size of corner cabinets are basically a 2 ft square, then front is cut back at 45 degrees to hold one door. I was able to use one of the paired doors from the old cabinets. The mate to this door will be used on the other corner cabinet.



Just a little clean up on this cabinet and will be ready to install. I still have not decided to keep the wood grain on cabinet faces or a solid light paint color to contrast against the existing doors. Originally I wasnt expecting the face of cabinets finish to be good enough to stain. That was before a bunch of oak veneer cabinet grade plywood was at my disposal.

If I had committed to just painting these from the start, could have used any type of wood for the face. But the extra work involved to have a matching wood grain and for stain is worth the trouble and learning experience.

Since I am not a wood building type person, it has been quite an education and rewarding to make these. They turned out much better than was expecting. With better tools and more time working with wood, it is taking less time and more refined finish with each cabinet. Using nearly new materials is also a big bonus.

Cost for this one cabinet is only the purchase of nail gun and nails. So roughly $25 plus tax. I ran out of glue, so that was another $8. Roughly $35 out of pocket. Not too bad since everything purchased will be used throughout the rest of this build.

Thanks for taking time to follow this thread. It would not be nearly as inspiring if there was little or no interest.
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Moving right along and yet another cabinet is done. Today I decided to focus on one more cabinet instead of taking a much needed trip out to the land of oak trees just yet.

This one upper cabinet will fit between the corner cabinet I just finished yesterday and where the range top is located.



I saw no reason not to use the old materials. This plywood is solid and will work just like if cut from a new sheet. Just have to do a little maintenance first and make it more user friendly. Btw thats a lot of nails.



For these cabinets I needed several pieces cut to the same size. Using this old combination square made it easy to set up a fence to make a zero cut on one edge. By setting the square to the right dimension made for quick setup and exactly to size for each additional piece that got cut.



After cutting a clean edge, I flipped the plank around and used another square to set the finish width.



Since all of these needed to be exactly the same size, it worked out well. Just using whats available can make for professional results, and less tedious sometimes.



Every time I made a cut with the Skil worm drive saw, there was a pile of fine saw dust on the base. I saw a potential use for this finer wood powder. Mixing it with some glue I used it to fill in some of the voids, like old nail holes or imperfections in the veneer. Fill it up, sand, then stain.



After a lot of sanding to smooth everything over, then cut the wood to size, time to nail them together and try to make another cabinet.



After a lot of the same old stuff I ended up with the box. You can see how it will attach to the corner cabinet here.



It didnt take any time before the doors were hung and this cabinet was getting close to being finished.



Now all of the shelves are in and the back is covered. Starting to look good.



The big finale here. Upper cabinets are finished and they fit together very well. Just hope they will hang up on wall and look as good.

One little surprise, you may see above. The left side with slightly narrower door will be right next to the stove top. This will be perfect for seasonings to be stored. Did not realize until after this door was hung. It is just under 1/2 inch shorter than all of the other doors. Dont know why, and doesnt really matter. Just something I overlooked and will just have to live with it. Like I am going to loose any sleep over it anyway. Not!

Thats it for today. Nothing, nadda no money out of pocket. Also got some more of the old demo'ed cabinet pieces put to use with this cabinet. Today I am a happy camper. Can you see the big grin on my face?
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