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Old 02-08-2010, 10:14 PM
wizardslovak wizardslovak is offline
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i have that snake scare , and i cant stand them.
Once on fishing , it was around midnight while i was enjoying my cigarette i realized something was moving close to my chair. Because it was cloth chair i got curious and checked underneath . I put light and i seen that big snake, i dont know what snake it was . But that think started ratling and just screamed jumped and run . I really dont like snakes .well thats my story
hopefully i wont meet it again.
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Old 02-09-2010, 01:26 AM
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Default Poisonous snakes

I live next to a large swamp,in Georgia, where two creeks run together. Last year my Akita and my Whatsis killed a large cottonmouth in the back yard, heard them making a racket the night before, found it stretched out in the yard next morning, huge black one. Several years ago had one in my pool, he was also very large, had to shoot him with shotgun, took a 2x4 to lift him out, he was heavy. I have found several babies in the skimmer over time.
My son killed three copperheads in the back yard a few years ago, too, came upon them mating under a discarded piece of vinyl. Last year my daughter was bitten twice on the hand in the same area, she went out to feed the dog and reached down for the pan in the dark, was hit on hand by a big one and a tiny one (small and large fang marks), nearly lost the arm. I myself have killed three or four over the years. I am very careful as the place seems to be alive with them. I really hate to go under the house to change the furnace filter, have found snake skins under there twice, large ones. I carry a 3' machete when I do, and a .22 pistol with snake shot.
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Old 02-09-2010, 01:31 AM
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Originally Posted by scottinaz View Post
I would eat rattlesnake over almost every other desert dweller,, but unless I come across one in a populated area, or I am hungry, I will let them be,, I used to kill them on sight too,, then I grew up,
I used to kill them on site, and grew up on them too! So it is a taste you grew to love huh!
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Old 02-09-2010, 08:59 AM
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I kill on average 10 "Pygmy" Rattle Snakes a year around my suburban home.
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Old 02-09-2010, 09:36 AM
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In KY. we have the eastern timber rattler and they can get huge. I have seen several over 6' long and a lot of 4-5 footers. These snakes are not nice. I seen in post about someone walking within a foot of one to get around it. They can and will strike half the body length. Sorry dumb idea to walk that close to one on purpose period. In the woods i will leave rattle and copperhead snakes alone, but around the house they are toast.
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Old 02-09-2010, 09:38 AM
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In KY. we have the eastern timber rattler and they can get huge. I have seen several over 6' long and a lot of 4-5 footers. These snakes are not nice. I seen in post about someone walking within a foot of one to get around it. They can and will strike half the body length. Sorry dumb idea to walk that close to one on purpose period. In the woods i will leave rattle and copperhead snakes alone, but around the house they are toast.
I wouldn't get that close to one either if I can help it
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Old 02-09-2010, 09:50 AM
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I did notice that its eyes were clouded over, so this was just before it was going to shed its skin,, they are more aggressive just after they shed i believe,,
I think you're very fortunate, I was taught growing up that a snake is more likely to strike while its eyes are clouded over as it can't see as well to identify the threat.

I had a near miss a few years ago at the pueblo reservoir. I was walking down a rocky embankment. At one point I decided the next rock wasn't a good idea to step onto(no clue why really it wasn't unstable and was larger than the ones I was walking on, but I digress) so sidestepped it a couple feet. A couple steps later I hear the rattle behind me. I turned around and in a crevice behind that rock was a 4 foot rattler. He was finishing a mouse he had just caught so I don't think he would have been able to bite me but I was spooked nonetheless.
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Old 02-09-2010, 10:04 AM
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I've had a few run ins with rattlers and one was a Mojave green. Not fun! I have no experience with Water Mocs or Copperheads and hope it stays that way. Around the house I kill them but out in the field I leave them be (without them we'd be overrun with mice, and the mice carry disease).

Once while hunting wild boar (isn't that name contradicting?) I ran across a LARGE diamond back suning himself. We were miles from the nearest house and he wasn't doing anything wrong so I let him be. Later, when I told the guide about it he scolded me for not killing it. He said "Next time you come out that snake is going to bite you!!" I replied, "No, next time I come out there will be a snake in the area who owes me a favor!"

Last edited by Half Moon Tune; 02-09-2010 at 10:08 AM.. Reason: spelling
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Old 02-09-2010, 10:04 AM
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Originally Posted by technojunkie View Post
I think you're very fortunate, I was taught growing up that a snake is more likely to strike while its eyes are clouded over as it can't see as well to identify the threat.

I had a near miss a few years ago at the pueblo reservoir. I was walking down a rocky embankment. At one point I decided the next rock wasn't a good idea to step onto(no clue why really it wasn't unstable and was larger than the ones I was walking on, but I digress) so sidestepped it a couple feet. A couple steps later I hear the rattle behind me. I turned around and in a crevice behind that rock was a 4 foot rattler. He was finishing a mouse he had just caught so I don't think he would have been able to bite me but I was spooked nonetheless.
Yes,, I wasn't sure how that worked,, I do know That Rattlesnakes Do not "Want" to bite you (with the exception of the Mojave Green, They are Psycho) and I know if they do hit you Its is often what they call a "Dry Strike" meaning no venom is delivered , reason being they dont want to waste good venom on something that is too big to eat,, Below is some good info i found on Rattlesnakes



RATTLESNAKE FAQ’s by Christie Klinger
http://www.alongtheway.org/rattlesnakes/faq.html


Q. How can I tell the difference between a rattlesnake and a harmless non-venomous snake?

A. Rattlesnakes can usually be identified by two key characteristics that non-venomous snakes lack. First, they have a broad triangular head, narrow neck and thick body. Secondly, they have a rattle on the end of their tail. Sometimes the rattle may be broken or missing, and the small button of a baby rattlesnakes rattle may be hard to see. If you can’t quickly determine from a safe distance whether a snake is a rattlesnake or not, leave it alone.



Q. How many different kinds of rattlesnakes can be found in Nevada?

A. There are five different species of rattlesnakes in Nevada. One of them, the Great Basin rattlesnake, is only found in the northern two-thirds of the state. The other four, the Western diamondback, Sidewinder, Speckled rattlesnake (two sub-species, the Southwestern Speckled and the Panamint), and the Mojave rattlesnake can be found in various areas of southern Nevada.



Q. The possibility of encountering a rattlesnake frightens me. What should I do?

A. Don’t let your fear keep you from enjoying the outdoors. Rattlesnakes are actually quite docile and shy when left undisturbed and will only strike in self defense when harassed or startled. Use caution when hiking in rattlesnake country. Wear sturdy shoes or boots and loose fitting pants. Stay on established trails and keep pets on a leash, even if they are well behaved. Scan the area in front of you and be aware of where you are placing your feet. Use caution when placing your hands or feet atop or among rocks and crevices. Avoid running or allowing children to run, especially in dense vegetation, as you may startle a snake or you may not see it until it is too late. If you do encounter a rattlesnake, keep a safe distance from it and leave it alone. Most rattlesnake bites result from the snake being harassed or picked up!



Q. Will I alert a rattlesnake on a trail if I make a lot of noise?

A. No. Snakes do not have external ears and are essentially deaf; however, they are very sensitive to vibrations. Therefore, although they may not hear you approaching, they will probably “feel” your footsteps as you get closer to them.



Q. What should I do if I get bitten by a rattlesnake? What if my pet gets bitten?

A. If you suffer a rattlesnake bite, seek medical attention as soon as possible. Remain calm and immobilize the wound, keeping it below heart level. Do not apply a tourniquet, cut or suction the wound, and do not apply ice. Identify the snake if possible, but only if it can be done safely and quickly. If it is necessary to walk, do so slowly, and rest frequently. Go immediately to the nearest emergency room or call 911. Follow the same procedure for a pet; only take them to the nearest veterinarian.



Q. Can I die from a rattlesnake bite?

A. With advancements in antivenin research and today’s medical technology, it is rare for a person to die from a rattlesnake bite provided they seek immediate medical attention. Although extremely painful and possibly life threatening with out medical intervention, most people make a full recovery without lasting effects from the bite.



Q. Can I tell how old a rattlesnake is by counting its rattles?

A. No. The rattlesnake’s rattle is composed of individual segments of keratin, the same material as your fingernails, and each time the snake sheds its skin (usually between 1 and 4 times a year) a new segment of the rattles is added. Baby rattlesnakes are born with one segment called a button and cannot make any sound until they shed and add new segments. Additionally, over time segments of the rattle may be lost due to wear and tear.



Q. Why do rattlesnakes rattle?

A. Rattlesnakes use their rattle to warn others. They may rattle to indicate they are present so they won’t be stepped on, or they may rattle if cornered or harassed to warn that they may be about to strike.



Q. Do rattlesnakes always rattle before they strike?

A. No, and they don’t always strike every time they rattle.



Q. How far can a rattlesnake strike?

A. As a rule of thumb, rattlesnakes can, at best, strike a distance of two-thirds their total body length. For example, a three foot long snake may be able to strike a distance of two feet. Always keep a safe distance from any snake.



Q. Do rattlesnakes always inject venom?

A. No. Some rattlesnake strikes are ‘dry bites’, meaning no venom is injected. In fact, rattlesnakes can discharge venom from either fang, both fangs, or neither one. If you suffer a rattlesnake bite, do not assume it was a dry bite. Always seek medical attention for any rattlesnake bite.



Q. What happens if a rattlesnake breaks a fang?

A. Rattlesnake fangs are continuously lost and replaced every six to ten weeks, much the same way shark teeth are replaced with new ones. If a rattlesnake breaks a fang as a result of a strike or other injury, it is simply replaced with the next available fang.



Q. I heard a rattling sound in my bushes. Should I assume there is a rattlesnake in my yard?

A. Not necessarily. There are several sounds that are often mistaken for the rattle of a rattlesnake. Cicadas are insects that can produce a loud buzzing noise that is often mistaken for the rattling of a snake. Wind rustling dry leaves also sometimes sounds like a rattlesnake.



Q. Can rattlesnakes swim or climb walls?

A. Rattlesnakes are capable of climbing trees and shrubs but rarely do so. It’s unlikely that they climb high block walls; however, many harmless non-venomous snakes can and do climb walls and shrubs. On the other hand, rattlesnakes are adept at swimming and will take to water readily in order to pursue food, mates and refuge, and to escape harassment.



Q. Are rattlesnakes territorial? If I see one near my house, is it going to stick around?

A. Rattlesnakes do not tend to be territorial, but do occupy home ranges. The home range is an area used by the snake that contains food resources and possible mates. They do not defend home ranges nor will they fight other snakes for access to a particular area. A snake may reuse a hiding place to rest, such as a hole or pile of debris, but once the prey has been depleted in that area, the snake will move on to a new area with more food. Rattlesnakes primarily feed on mice and other small rodents. By keeping your property free of this food source and eliminating hiding places by removing wood piles and other clutter, you can reduce your chances of encountering a rattlesnake on your property.



Q. If I kill a rattlesnake, will its mate hang around? I heard they travel in pairs.

A. Rattlesnakes are usually found together during the mating season but are rarely observed traveling in pairs during other times of the year. It is a myth that if a rattlesnake is killed its mate will remain behind to seek vengeance on the killer.



Q. Do rattlesnake mothers take care of their babies?

A. No. Unlike most snakes, rattlesnakes give birth to live babies and do not lay eggs. Within hours of birth the baby snakes scatter in search of food and receive no assistance from their parents.



Q. What should I do if I see a rattlesnake on my property?

A. If you find a snake on your property, from a safe distance try to get a good look at it and determine if it is a rattlesnake or, more likely, a harmless non-venomous snake. Pay close attention to the shape of the head and tail, and whether it has any distinctive markings or colors. If possible, try to contain the snake by placing a bucket or some other object over the snake, but only if you can do so safely. If you are certain the snake on your property is a rattlesnake, call the Nevada Department of Wildlife, and someone will come out to remove the snake. If the snake is not a rattlesnake, it is harmless and should be left alone, and it will eventually move on.



Q. What time of year and time of day are rattlesnakes most active?

A. Generally, rattlesnakes emerge from hibernation in March or April, or when the average daytime temperatures reach and remain about 60F and higher. The snakes are then most active when the temperatures are between 80-90F. This means that the snakes may be active most of the day during the spring, and during the early mornings and late afternoons throughout the summer. Exposure to temperatures above 110F for more than a few minutes is enough to kill a rattlesnake; therefore, during the hottest part of summer, snakes are seldom observed, except occasionally at night. Snake activity picks up again as temperatures begin to fall in late summer and early autumn before they go into hibernation as early as September or as late as December.
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Old 02-09-2010, 10:09 AM
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Scottinaz, where in the high desert did you live? I live in the high desert.
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Old 02-09-2010, 10:11 AM
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Scottinaz, where in the high desert did you live? I live in the high desert.
I sent you a PM
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Old 02-10-2010, 10:06 PM
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Oh ya. Many years ago, we had a trading post out on the Navajo Indian Res. Lizards would often get into the store, and our dog (a pointer) would chase them down and point them out in the classic bird-dog stance. Problem is, the lizard wouldn't stand still for this, so old 'Yo" would slap him if he moved. After two or three slaps they would stop moving. We thought this was funny as hell.

But one day while out hiking old Yo cornered a big rattler in a thicket. We couldn't see the action but it was easy to guess what was going on; the snake would buzz, Yo would slap it, then yap when he was bit, then the snake would buzz and Yo would yap again. After being bit on the face twice, Yo wised up and let the snake go.

No, it didn't kill him but it sure taught him a lesson. I took him to town and bought a dose of horse serum from the hospital (the town doc refused to administer it, said he didn't treat animals), so I jabbed him myself. Yo was sure a sorry dog for a couple of weeks.

And foresure, he left reptiles of any kind alone after that.

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Old 03-06-2010, 08:11 AM
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I live in Middle TN close to a State Park with lots of woods/forest and rock formations.

About 4 years ago I reached under a flower to pluck a weed (which was growing right outside my sunroom), long story short, was bitten by a Copperhead. VERY unpleasant experience to say the least.

Now I am really apprehensive about stomping around in the woods, even though I need to get out there and clean up fallen limbs, etc . I used to enjoy walks on the property.

Would those "snake boots" really work for protection and if so, what brand is best?
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Old 03-06-2010, 09:46 AM
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Yup Coppers are no fun attt all.Most snakes I will leave alone but not Coppers ! Check sportsmans guide they usually have some good deals on snaker boots.Can't really suggest a brand name ,try find one made by a brand like redwing or chippawea(not sure on spelling ) and you should be OK.
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Old 03-07-2010, 01:52 AM
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Around here rattlesnake populations can be a hit and miss, some places have hardly any some have a good amount, but ....... some have ALOT and mean ALOT. My dad told me about a camping trip up by the middle fork feather river where they killed about 20 snakes in the course of 2 days.
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Old 03-07-2010, 02:17 AM
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I got one of those chain emails from a buddy of mine the other day that fits this conversation perfectly...

Quote:
I took a lease on a piece of land where there are plenty of deer roaming around. I put up a stand in a nice place where several game trails cross; but because of some obstacles I encountered getting to my stand last Saturday, I've decided to forego any more attempts at bagging a trophy deer this year... So, if anybody wants my deer stand for the rest of the year, it's open to any one who would like to take a stab at it.

My heart can't take another day like last Saturday.
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Old 03-07-2010, 07:39 AM
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Where was that deer stand? I want to be sure to avoid it!!!
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Old 03-07-2010, 07:57 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by scottinaz View Post
There is a rumor that somebody seen a Gator in the Topock marsh here in Arizona,, I guess its possible,, good environment but certainly not indigenous to Arizona, I have never seen a gator and I dont want too,, lol

BTW,, Yes,,, Rattlesnake does taste like crab meat i guess,, just not as "Crabby" lol,, its really quite good ,
No rumor down here, just fact. Gators are alive and well in AZ

There is a breeding pair in the San Pedro river in Cochise county. A family member took a pic of a 5ft on the bridge off hwy 90

BLM is trying to keep a id on it, there are at least 8, 12 inch little ones in the ponds eating birds
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Old 03-07-2010, 03:46 PM
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Back last October I was walking this jogging trail in San Diego, CA and saw a rattlesnake. It was early in the morning, maybe 8am. This trail is pretty long, about 3 miles long going from a residental street to a more busy main street. About half way in, I saw the rattlesnake, it was about 3 feet long. At first I just thought it was a regular snake until I saw the rattles. It was just crossing the trail right ahead of me. I stayed clear of it. And about 20 years ago I saw this guy get bit by a baby rattlesnake. We were in Azusa, CA offroading with friends. We discovered this rattlesnake, about 1 foot long, by some rocks. This one guy comes around and tries to pick it up. The snake got loose from his fingers and bit him on the hand. He was out of there to the hospital in no time.
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Old 03-07-2010, 04:01 PM
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I H8 Rattlers they scare the **** out of me...I could never kill one with a pistol or rifle I shake to bad, unless it was a shot gun I would surely miss....
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