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Old 08-16-2019, 10:53 AM
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Default Isolated from Preps, What Happens if You Can Not Get Home?



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Simple question, triggered by having to nake several long trips to deal with family issues this year.

How do you survive if the SHTF while you are traveling, if the Airlines are shut down, and you are several days auto travel from home?

What if power is out, no credible news or communication, credit cards, and GPS are not working, and fuel is very limited.?

Basically have only what you carried with you and what you can buy with cash.

Btw, I am suggesting a Carrington size solar flare fries all existing satelites, and most of the US power grid.
https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Solar_storm_of_1859

Last edited by kokosmom2; 08-17-2019 at 10:47 AM..
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Old 08-16-2019, 11:03 AM
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Do the best you can to get home...
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Old 08-16-2019, 11:19 AM
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This is why skills matter more than gear.
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Old 08-16-2019, 11:50 AM
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The sooner you start walking the sooner you might make it home.

[Though there might be other short term options.]

You mentioned family issues --

.... if you are on vacation, well the sooner you all start walking the better.

... if you are dealing with a serious medical issue -- say staying at a hotel while family member is getting care at a hospital with no family home nearby. Then, you have care issues to consider. Your family member may not last a day without the medical care and you might want to be there for the good bye [and find a shovel for the burial on hospital grounds]. Otherwise, 'borrow' a wheelchair and start walking.

.... if you are in a family home of another part of your family, you have to consider what is available there, make some plans, figure out what the other part of the family wants, and so on. Is the main part of your personal family with you? Is the situation better/worse than your 'home location' situation. So on and so on. You might stay awhile [say to let that blizzard pass]. You might stay longer. You might stay permanently. You might just start walking [or biking] as before.

.... if you are in a mid-point of your travel -- hopefully not in a plane, but then you wouldn't have anything to worry about -- you still have to start walking, it is just a matter of which direction.
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Old 08-16-2019, 01:07 PM
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If you can buy a bicycle and a few survival items you might make it home. If not you will have to look for opportunities wherever you get stuck at. Who knows? There might be a lonely semi-widow lady (Her husband might just be stuck somewhere else like you are) that will take you in for your help about the place.
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Old 08-16-2019, 01:21 PM
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Well, whatever you do, afterwards you write a book about it.

The world ending while your away from home seems to be the premise of most prepper fiction. No doubt because it is a more interesting story than "And then I locked my doors and lived off my preps for the next three years)


Anyway.

First, you have to realistically evaluate getting home vs starting over again.

If you don't have family at home that you need to return to, just stuff, you need to think about wether its worth it to get back there. If you are several days by car away that could be a couple thousand miles. That could mean years worth of travel in the apocalypse. There very likely could be nothing there by the time you make it back. You very well could be better off figuring out how to survive where you are than spending the rest of your life wandering the roads.

But...most people won't have this option because most people will have family they are not willing to abandon back home.

So, you do what you can. Beg borrow steal transportation and hit the road, rivers or seas.

The sooner the better. You can expect most vehicles to start the end of the world with 150 miles worth of gas in them, a week later though and 90% of them could be empty, so time is of the essence.

Many travelers will not survive. Many will never make it home. Try to avoid being in that situation to begin with.
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Old 08-16-2019, 01:51 PM
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So I've thought this over a bunch of times and there's some cold hard facts you have to accept.

1. If you can't get home within a pretty short window and it's really all that bad, you may arrive to find your stuff already looted unless you are really, really remote. This raises the question of whether getting home is really the goal if you'd have to make a month-long journey, only to find the place looted or even worse, occupied (as it likely would be if it had significant natural resources or amenities not easily carried away).

2. If you are willing to spend out the money, you could leave large caches at family's houses where you spend time visiting. For instance, I go down with my family to see my grandmother in TN a couple times a year. We're a solid 6 hour drive from home at that point, usually having to stop for gas once even if we had a full tank of premium (which, by the way, means going the quickest/shortest route using interstates that would almost certainly be impassible by this point, if you estimated an additional 30% fuel usage for funding alternate sub-optimal detours you might still not have enough). So I have thought what if I left a bunch of preps there, along with some gear and equipment. That way if SHTF while we're down there, we have a little bit of depth besides what we brought with us.

3. People have made threads about leaving caches in self-storage places on or near likely transportation routes. But that's significant cost with no guarantee you'd be able to access it unless you're willing to always carry some bolt cutters in the trunk. If you spaced caches out every 200 miles along a 600 mile corridor, so that you're never more than 100 miles from a cache, a 5x5 or 5x10 would easily cost you $1200ish a year. For rent for your caches. Not a great use of your money especially if you don't travel that often.

4. Again, if traveling by vehicle, another possible solution would be to focus on extending your range. The obvious answer there is to add external mounting points for durable fuel cans that would be kept full during trips. 3x 5-gal jerry cans = 300 miles, give or take in your SUV. If you want to be able to navigate past other cars more easily get a motorcycle, and if you have a small family, a sidecar. store some extra gas on the motorbike and you're back in business. Most of the examples and research I've seen seems to suggest EMP would not kill most vehicles unless they were really close to the pulse.

5. Flying is obviously the worst case scenario. There's not much you can do. Pre-stage preps at recurring destinations.
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Old 08-16-2019, 02:26 PM
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Something to keep in mind, if it is specifically a CME, there should be 12-18 hours warning.

Most people will not know what to do. However, if you are mentally prepared to jump when your solar alert app goes off, you could conceivably make it home, or most of the way, by vehicle before it hits, before people know what is going on and the roads close.

But that means not waiting to see what happens, no hesitation. It means maxing out your credit card, renting the biggest SUV you can at the airport, filling the back of it up with gas cans at your first stop on the way out of town, pounding no-doze and driving straight through while the world around you is still just starting to think about things.
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Old 08-16-2019, 03:48 PM
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I walk home. I'm usually never more than 20-40 miles from home. A few times a year, I travel about 80 miles away. Worst case scenario, I'm home in a week.
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Old 08-16-2019, 04:14 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Aerindel View Post
Something to keep in mind, if it is specifically a CME, there should be 12-18 hours warning.

Most people will not know what to do. However, if you are mentally prepared to jump when your solar alert app goes off, you could conceivably make it home, or most of the way, by vehicle before it hits, before people know what is going on and the roads close.

But that means not waiting to see what happens, no hesitation. It means maxing out your credit card, renting the biggest SUV you can at the airport, filling the back of it up with gas cans at your first stop on the way out of town, pounding no-doze and driving straight through while the world around you is still just starting to think about things.
Great observation.
Now days I worried about trips 6-800 miles from home, and I already carry vehicle BoB (Rifle, food, and camping gear).
But even with a one hour warning, I should be able to buy an extra 20 gallons, and that should get me home.
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Old 08-16-2019, 04:35 PM
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I really just don't travel anymore aside from a yearly trip to Albuquerque.

The best I can recommend is get one of those L shaped transfer tanks that go under your tool box.

https://www.northerntool.com/shop/to...4485_200334485.
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Old 08-16-2019, 06:37 PM
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I'm surprised most people imagine their home (i.e. all their preps) are immune to shtf given that the most common actual (not imaginary) shtf scenarios involve destruction of one's home by fire, flood, earthquake, etc.

I'm also surprised that most people imagine that if they are far from home when bad things happen, that home will be the safest place to head. It may very well be that being away from home saved your life.

Seems to me a wise prepper bases their plan around what they have with them all the time, and works out from there. Skills over gear.

Recommend folks read anti-fragile, not a prepper book, but should be - its about mindset.
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Old 08-16-2019, 06:46 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by heldfast View Post
I'm surprised most people imagine their home (i.e. all their preps) are immune to shtf given that the most common actual (not imaginary) shtf scenarios involve destruction of one's home by fire, flood, earthquake, etc.

I'm also surprised that most people imagine that if they are far from home when bad things happen, that home will be the safest place to head. It may very well be that being away from home saved your life.

Seems to me a wise prepper bases their plan around what they have with them all the time, and works out from there. Skills over gear.

Recommend folks read anti-fragile, not a prepper book, but should be - its about mindset.
Let me guess....you live in a city? on the flood plane? don't have a home fire suppression system and didn't click on the OPs link?

The first place you start prepping is your own home. The common things should be very very uncommon in a preppers home. If you are mostly worried about your home being destroyed then you need to move, fortify, etc, solve that problem first. If your home is not the safest place in the world that you can get to (in your opinion of course) then why are you even living there in the first place?
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Old 08-16-2019, 07:00 PM
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We have a loosely-based prepper network around Tulsa. If I'm in Tulsa/Osage Co but far from home, there are people I can call or places that I can show up and know I am welcome. Ditto, there are people that could come to our place if the shoe is on the other foot. We also use each other for house/pet sitting services when we do travel.

When I travel far away, I just have to say what will be will be otherwise, there is no point in going on vacation if all I am going to do is sit around worrying the whole time about SHTF. We keep the basics on us and will just have to hope our skills carry us through.

One big change for us - we no longer fly. The last place I want to be if SHTF is at the mercy of an airline. If we can't drive, we don't go. Even in NYC where we have to park miles away from the hotel or more likely friends house, at least we know we have a vehicle available if we can get to it before they lock down bridges and tunnels. If that happens all bets are off. I'm not going to base my life around the possibility and isolate myself from the world.
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Old 08-17-2019, 02:29 AM
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Right now, the biggest obstacle for me to get home if SHTF is if I'm in Canada and they close the border.

Depending on what SHTF, being in Canada at that time might be a good thing
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Old 08-17-2019, 02:32 AM
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Quote:
Right now, the biggest obstacle for me to get home if SHTF is if I'm in Canada and they close the border.
Its not like they have a wall. The canadian border crossing I've been through could be run by simply not stopping when they ask you too.
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Old 08-17-2019, 02:40 AM
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However, the traffic jam approaching the border, depending on which crossing
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Old 08-17-2019, 06:06 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by merlinfire View Post
1. If you can't get home within a pretty short window...
I've tried to estimate this window. I figure anywhere between 72-96 hours (3-4 days) before people start getting dangerously weird. The majority of people are pretty helpful directly after a crisis, but as potable water becomes limited, access to gasoline is cut short, food supplies drop...people will quickly turn. While some petty theft occurs during that time period of a SHTF, serious attacks won't take too long if there's limited law enforcement.

While the scenarios are all different, I've averaged that window to 3-4 days where I have to make a concerted effort to get home or reassess the plan.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Sharkbait View Post
The best I can recommend is get one of those L shaped transfer tanks that go under your tool box.

https://www.northerntool.com/shop/to...4485_200334485.
This is pretty interesting and I hadn't see these before. That's a lot of on-board fuel. Even with a gas guzzling truck, that will likely add an additional 1200-1500 miles to your range. If I was traveling 600-800 miles away, and was serious, this would be at the top of my list as a "get home" investment. I will likely get a new truck this next year and this is a looking like an excellent accessory to add...

Quote:
Originally Posted by MattB4 View Post
If you can buy a bicycle and a few survival items you might make it home.
Having done distance backpacking, my limits both physically and what I can realistically carry without resupply is about 150 miles maximum. I recently did slightly over 105 miles (trail miles) over 7 days plus three hours the next morning on the 8th day. While I wasn't pushing it hard except for one day, that just showed me my limitations both physically and how much I could realistically carry (40-45 pounds) for several consecutive days (although your pack weight drops as you consume the food). I figure on flatter terrain, I could make slightly better distance every day, but it's a combination of physical fitness, body-recovery, existing physical limitations, and how much food you can carry.

With that in mind, I have in the past and would recommend considering adding a bike to your vehicle kit if you have room. I have a Montague Folding mountain bike that easily fits in the back seat area of my crew cab for security. If you can stick to even unimproved, gravel/dirt roads, you can still make about 60-90 miles a day, depending on the condition of the roads and it's much less physically taxing than on foot...and you'll use a lot less food in the long run.

I also concur with the recommendations that if you have a destination where you can store a cache, do this...including some fuel you can rotate. If the distance is really 600-800 miles, strongly consider one of those RDS fuel transfer tanks, and also consider adding a mountain bike if forced to dismount from the vehicle. Even with a smaller bugout bag, you can still ride your bike (or add a trailer).

Now, if your home is in the crisis area where you simply can't return, that's a whole different plan...a relocation plan and likely forced to restart with just what you have in your vehicle and on your person...that's really a worse-case scenario if the crisis is country-wide. Another reason why building up a small cache at your destination is not a bad idea at all...

ROCK6
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Old 08-17-2019, 09:31 AM
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In most events there is a time window you can use to do your travel home. Before the lawlessness and crazies start coming out. As others have said,its time to utilize your grey matter when youve got nothing else.
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Old 08-17-2019, 10:45 AM
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SHTF is not going to happen instantaneously, so there is plenty of time if you become isolated to rent a car and get home, or buy a car and get home, or hitchhike.
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