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Old 08-18-2019, 10:23 AM
Survival Sam Survival Sam is offline
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Default Lightweight but warm sleeping bag recommendations?



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Looking for something light weight but warm below freezing. I'm OK with down, not worried about cost.
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Old 08-18-2019, 10:33 AM
Rural Buckeye Guy Rural Buckeye Guy is online now
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Well, Ohio gets prettying cold and so far, I have successfully utilized clothing layers, closed cell pad, zippered poncho liner and a wool army blanket with a head slit (side to side holds more heat) with a poncho wind break and a hot water bottle (old plastic flask) very successfully.all of that remains warm when wet, unlike down. My rig is designed for hikes or bugging out and can be wrung out quickly.
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Old 08-18-2019, 10:45 AM
Corpus Corpus is offline
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Default Lightweight but warm sleeping bag recommendations?

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Originally Posted by Survival Sam View Post
Looking for something light weight but warm below freezing. I'm OK with down, not worried about cost.


Iíve used and like JacksRBetter, Outdoor Wilderness Logics(I think itís Dutchwear now), and WarbonnetOutdoors. I use a hammock so I have both top quilts and underquilts and Iíve been very happy with all three of the manufacturers above. There are many cottage manufacturers that have excellent winter bags or top quilts but those three are the first that come to mind.

ETA:
Iíve used all of their ď0įĒ quilts at well below zero and been plenty comfy, if you just need a little below freezing then a ď0įĒ from one of the names above may be overkill. Fortunately they sell several different temp ranges.
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Old 08-18-2019, 10:52 AM
Outpost75 Outpost75 is offline
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I follow a simlar approach as Rural Buckeye Guy, and live in the Potomac Highlands of West Virginia. Key is to dress in layers for the expected weather. In deer season here this is usually a silk or polypro base layer, waffle-weave zip-up pullover, Finnish wool anorak, Gore Tex wind pants, Navy watch cap and Nomex aviator's gloves.

I carry in my small German ruck a fleece zip-up vest as an extra warming layer, extra dry Smartwool socks in a Ziplok bag, a microfiber sleep cap for my bald head and a small GoreTex drawstring bag used to pack my outer layer clothes and boots to take with me inside the bivvy as improvised pillow and so my body heat can help dry them or at least keep them from freezing.

Ruck contains a GI quart canteen, nesting cup with Natick stand, Esbit or trioxane fuel tabs, mess kit spoon, Fiscars WoodZig folding saw, small hatchet, Mil-K-818 pocket knife, six single-serve instant coffee packets or tea bags, 2 Knorr soup envelopes, a CW-LRP ration and two pint water flasks which can be used as hot water bottles at night, and a Frontier Filter-Pro military version water filter.

Planning standard is to make an overnight bivouac with hot warming beverages, and tend fire overnight for hot breakfast before walking out.

I don't carry a sleeping bag, but instead a GoreTex bivvy sack, which I sleep inside with a USGI poncho liner. A USGI poncho is rigged as wind screen and overhead cover. A fabric-backed USGI aluminized Mylar casualty blanket is used as an additional wind screen and fire reflector.

I've done this enough times that I have six ten-foot lengths of paracord pre-cut and a pair of snap-links and a rubber bungee to rig the shelter between two trees. Several times overnighted in the woods during wet snow and freezing rain conditions. While not fun, comfy, warm and toasty, I got a little fitful sleep, would then awake to tend the the fire drink some hot soup and then doze off again. Avoiding hypothermia I was able to walk out in the next morning exploiting the fire to hydrate an LRP-CW ration for hot breakfast, then to walk out in good visibility, thus avoiding being stupid and possibly injuring myself trying to find my way back to camp in the wet, foggy, icy dark.

Important in such conditions is having reliable comms with the fellows back at camp, so they don't put themselves at risk going out in the dark searching for me, or unnecessarily calling the Sheriff or Forest service to initiate a SAR mission. I use the 2-meter radio to contact them at dusk. Give them my approximate location and notify them that because it's getting dark, I'm making a bivouac and fire, staying put, and that I am OK. I'll check back with them in the morning and with luck will be asking them for some help to drag in that big buck we saw yesterday!
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Old 08-18-2019, 04:37 PM
NateMeans NateMeans is offline
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You mentioned closed cell pad...I use Thermarest pad only in warm weather months and add one of their bags on top of that in the winter months. Reflective side up.


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Originally Posted by Rural Buckeye Guy View Post
Well, Ohio gets prettying cold and so far, I have successfully utilized clothing layers, closed cell pad, zippered poncho liner and a wool army blanket with a head slit (side to side holds more heat) with a poncho wind break and a hot water bottle (old plastic flask) very successfully.all of that remains warm when wet, unlike down. My rig is designed for hikes or bugging out and can be wrung out quickly.
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Old 08-18-2019, 11:59 PM
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evilwhitey evilwhitey is offline
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This forum always cracks me up. Guy asks for something lightweight, cost isn't a factor, and he gets replies from guys using arguably heavy (2-3x a lightweight solution), and certainly bulky solutions.

Plenty of cottage companies out there are making solid down quilts and sleeping bags. I've used zpacks and enlightened equipment, both great and recommended but these days I'd probably go EE between the two.

My 20F down bag is a legit, warm and comfy 20F down bag when paired with the proper pad(s) underneath. I typically use an xtherm (never had an issue with leaks) for colder months, and carry a cut down ~ 200g zrest pad for general use (it's one of my few luxury weight items) and sleeping pad backup duties.

For reference my bag (kind of a bag/quilt hybrid) is 19oz, isn't the lightest available these days by any means and packs down fairly small. My bag has water resistant material, but new bags have that in addition to treated down. Really, anyone using down should also be using a waterproof stuff sack; I use a zpacks cuben stuff sack and it's been great.

https://enlightenedequipment.com
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Old 08-19-2019, 07:54 AM
johnmcd johnmcd is offline
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I really like the Snugpak Softie Elite series - I use the 1 for warmer trips (down to around 45-50), and the 5 for the cold ones. The 5 model is around 5 lbs, but it's good down to around -5. There's also a 3 model that's about 3 lbs and is good down to 20 or so.
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Old 08-19-2019, 08:13 AM
Don H Don H is offline
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I'm partial to Montbell bags. I own three Downhugger 800s, #1, 3 and 5.
I like that they stretch and give you room to move while hugging your body to reduce air space.
https://www.montbell.us/products/list.php?cat_id=14001
The #1 weighs 2.4 pounds and is rated at 15 degrees EN (European Normal).

Be aware that many sleeping bag manufacturers will rate their bag's temperature very optimistically. EN rated bags are tested to a standard.
https://seattlebackpackersmagazine.c...stem-en-13537/
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Old 08-19-2019, 11:12 AM
wellbuilt wellbuilt is offline
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I bought a down pack packers bag 20 years ago from llbean a use it all the time .
The Most important thing is the zipper .
2 years ago we moved from my old trailer into a partly finish house .
Some days we get there and it is 0 inside .
I just thru the bag over me and go to sleep.
I wash it every few months and hang it to dry .
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Old 08-19-2019, 11:12 AM
JRR JRR is offline
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Sleeping bags are last century.

https://enlightenedequipment.com/enigma-custom/
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Old 08-19-2019, 01:24 PM
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Some excellent recommendations already made when it comes to down. I'm not opposed to a sleeping bag, but I've found quits even more compact and lighter without sacrificing coverage. Most quilts are mated to a sleeping pad to supplant the lost insulation of a flattened sleeping bag you sleep on.

Cost aside, down (especially the newer treated dri-down) is still the best choice. Most bags are also extremely robust and with the treatments, pretty much immune from clumping due to a dunking, rain, condensation/humidity. Some caution as usual, don't use it around an open flame and they do require a little more care...but if it's an essential part of your kit, that goes without saying (basically common sense).

ROCK6
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Old 08-19-2019, 08:36 PM
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THE last time I was in a sleeping bag it was moose camp and it was -20 inside the tent.

I don't know about the new bags but my "antique" Slumberjack with the double zips was so warm... sometime during the night I had really tucked in and I woke up sweating in my bag. I had to slowly vent the bag so I could acclimate a bit while putting on the clothes I had stuffed into the foot of the bag.

I know technology has come far, but that bag was good for an honest -30 or colder.
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Old 08-24-2019, 05:29 AM
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Can't make specific recommendations because of locations, but I would heartily recommend a down bag. Mine cost about $400, weighs two pounds and keeps me warm even though there is ice on the outside of the bivvy bag. My entire sleeping system (down bag, self-inflating mat and gore-tex ex-Army bivvy bag) weighs about 4 pounds, and the outer bag doubles as a waterproof pack liner.
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Old 08-24-2019, 06:45 AM
Corpus Corpus is offline
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Iím not sure if the OP has been back to check the thread but if so Iíd add to my earlier post:
Do you hang or sleep on the ground?
I choose underquilts because I hang. If youíre on the ground an underquilt and all the insulation under you in a sleeping bag would be almost useless and youíd be better off with a insulated pad and topquilt. Some of the topquilts are made to attach to a pad to keep them in place.
JacksRBetter makes one that can be worn like a coat, Iíve never tried that model (Sierra Sniveller) but I do have their ďGreylock4Ē underquilt and they make a great product.
As I said earlier there are a ton of options out there.
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Old 08-24-2019, 04:20 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Corpus View Post
JacksRBetter makes one that can be worn like a coat, Iíve never tried that model (Sierra Sniveller) but I do have their ďGreylock4Ē underquilt and they make a great product.
As I said earlier there are a ton of options out there.
I have the JRB Sierra Stealth (40 degree) and love it; it's my primary quilt for about 8-9 months of the year. The wearable feature is nice, but I don't use it too often except if just doing mostly static lounging in cooler weather. I wouldn't advocate your primary sleep system as something you use as your clothing layer system, but it does offer versatility in some niche cases. As a top quilt, it's excellent for both the hammock and sleeping pad.

For longer durations of below freezing weather, I would probably recommend something with an integrated hood/head cover. The Sniveller/Stealth quilts lack an integrated head cover requiring a hat or separate hood; just something to be aware of.

ROCK6
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Old 08-24-2019, 04:56 PM
Corpus Corpus is offline
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Default Lightweight but warm sleeping bag recommendations?

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Originally Posted by ROCK6 View Post
I have the JRB Sierra Stealth (40 degree) and love it; it's my primary quilt for about 8-9 months of the year. The wearable feature is nice, but I don't use it too often except if just doing mostly static lounging in cooler weather. I wouldn't advocate your primary sleep system as something you use as your clothing layer system, but it does offer versatility in some niche cases. As a top quilt, it's excellent for both the hammock and sleeping pad.



For longer durations of below freezing weather, I would probably recommend something with an integrated hood/head cover. The Sniveller/Stealth quilts lack an integrated head cover requiring a hat or separate hood; just something to be aware of.



ROCK6


I agree itís probably best suited as something you use just around camp. I could see using it when youíre (carefully) making your morning coffee or something. I think the fabric used in down coats is a bit sturdier than that used in quilts. Not sure if itís JRB or one of the other makers but Iíve seen down sleeves at one of them. I used to have a down hat for sleeping but now I prefer a thick boiled wool hat if itís below zero or just a fleece beanie above zero. A good tip I stole from Shug is the fleece breath/frost catcher tied to the ridgeline...works well keeping frost off my topquilt.

Frost bib:

https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=4n06cgAMNec
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Old 09-02-2019, 05:21 PM
Comcamguy Comcamguy is offline
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I have the Kifaru Slick bag

Select your rating , that have ones all the way down to -20

https://store.kifaru.net/slick-bag-p73.aspx

Last edited by Comcamguy; 09-02-2019 at 05:21 PM.. Reason: Add link
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Old 09-02-2019, 11:00 PM
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Sometimes down, sometimes synthetic, depends on how you intend to use it.
As important as the bag is your sleeping pad. Personally I use a short z-rest under a blow-up pad 2 1/2in thick. The combined weight of my combination is abt the same as a full length thermarest, mine is much more comfortable.
Temperature ratings are dependent on the thickness of your bag for the most part. I think 2.5in thick (on top) is necessary to be comfortable at freezing. The bottom of the bag is going to compress to nothing, your insulation and warmth with come primarily from your sleeping pad.
REI is a good place to start.
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Old 09-03-2019, 01:16 AM
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If cost is not a factor, then hydrophobic down bags from Feathered Friends or Western Mountaineering.

When it comes to retail sleeping bags, you can purchase Warm, Lightweight, or Affordable. Pick Two. (Actually, if you pay attention to drastically discounted classified sales by individuals, you can occasionally score all three in the form of a very high performance & lightly used bag.)

I find that a legitimately EN comfort rated zero degree bag is my weapon of choice for most shoulder season outings and a lot of winter ones. I do more winter stuff than warm weather events. I carry bags rated for at least 20 degrees (Fahrenheit) cooler than the predicted weather. And always, always... an accompanying breathable bivy sack and pad.

Off the top of my head, I own 9 bags rated from +28F to -40F. Both down & synthetic. A 0* F down bag hits my sweet spot for the most utility across the broadest range of conditions outside of hot summer. Able to be comfortably employed even in shoulder seasons and relatively mild cool weather (30s - 40s). You can unzip a warmer bag when its full insulation isn't needed. You can even employ it as a quilt. But after you get through employing all the little tricks of the trade to sleep comfortably, you can't make a too-light-in-the-ass bag significantly warmer.

Although I've spent countless nights using poncho liners or patrol style bags down to first frost or wet snow flurry temps, there's nothing quite like unrolling and employing a decent cold weather bag when everyone else is shivering. Even in the desert. Go to sleep with temps over 100F... wake up at dawn with all metal coated in frost. Totally comfortable after having slept the night toasty in something rated for 0F, 15F, or 20F. Or having slept wonderfully in a snow trench during single digit cold weather, snug inside of a -20F down bag. Or when bivouacking in the face of driving rain & wind chill even during nominally warm months.

At elevation (mountains), my bag is always a winter rated one. Period. Mountain weather can kill you at any time of year.
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Old 09-03-2019, 01:42 AM
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If temps are predicted to get to around freezing, I use a 10* Englightened Equipment Convert with 2oz extra down. It's a hoodless sleeping bag/quilt with a zipper and thus is super versatile. But any of the cottage companies mentioned above make good quilts.

If you really want quality and lightweight and want to go below freezing then a bag is generally a must and I'd pick Western Mountaineering every time.

My experience is with UL backpacking, not basecamping.
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