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Old 12-25-2015, 04:08 PM
Cephalotus Cephalotus is offline
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Default Any experinec with "breathable" reflective material?



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Several companies are offering (expensive) reflective nylon fabric that is advertised as breathable, so it is different than the typical mylar stuff...

Is there any experience available with such fabrics.

How much warmth do they reflect if used as an (additional) bivy bag?

How much rain can they resist?

What about condensation?

Is it advisable to make a inner tent out of this stuff. (for winter use)?

How noisy is it?

How long does it last?

etc...

http://www.2gosystems.com/products/t...ant=5897656453

http://www.thermartex.com/products.html

http://www.surviveoutdoorslonger.com...ape-bivvy.html

thanks.
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Old 12-25-2015, 05:51 PM
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TMcArthur TMcArthur is offline
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I have an SOS emergency bivy that is both reflective and breathable. Be that as it may, the last time I used it outside when it was cold, the inside of the bivy was covered with condensation. I was on a foam pad and wrapped up in a mil-surp wool blanket and didn't notice it until I woke up. The combination was comfortable down to the 40s, I suspect partially due to the bivy not contacting the wool that much.
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Old 12-26-2015, 12:50 AM
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I've had mesh in stuff like orange road vests with a reflective strip on it.

How much reflective does one need?
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Old 12-26-2015, 10:41 AM
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The material has to be against your body such as clothing or bivy bag to get any reflective benefit. It doesn't work as the inside of a tent or such.
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Old 12-27-2015, 12:00 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by franklin View Post
The material has to be against your body such as clothing or bivy bag to get any reflective benefit. It doesn't work as the inside of a tent or such.
Thanks, but I fail to see the logic behind that.

IR acts similarly to visible light, so I would say that a mirror works well from a distance, too.

You can try this with mylar blankets, They work well as IR reflectors from a distance, too. But the do not work well as a bivy bag or inner tent, because mylar is very noisy, rips very easily and is not breathable.
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Old 12-27-2015, 12:03 PM
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How much reflective does one need?
As much as possible. 50% would be the absolute minimum, 75% is better, almost 100% would be nice.

And it needs to be robust, lightweight, not noisy and breathable and water resistant, should survive compression in a backpack, should not mold when wet. Resistance against sparks would be a nice benefit...
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Old 12-27-2015, 08:59 PM
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Not true. Hang it up behind a camp fire and you'll feel the additional reflected heat.

Now ANY shelter will be easier to heat if it is smaller. Less surface area to lose heat from. Hence a bivy or clothing with - or without - reflective insulation is going to be warmer than a larger tent. However a large tent with reflective insulation will still be warmer then one without. A minimally sized shelter with reflective insulation will be warmest of all.
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Old 12-27-2015, 09:50 PM
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Tyvek is pretty good stuff. Tear resistant and not terribly noisy. They also use it in CBW protective suits.

My experience is with the SOL version of it.



Last night I tested it outside again. We had gusty winds of 20-30 mph. Temps dropped to 39 F. I supplemented it with a foam pad underneath, a mil surp wool blanket inside and a towel for my head. The towel was the only change from my last test. Last time in order to stay warm I had to cinch the head opening up as tightly as possible. I believe this allowed my breath to go inside the sack and led to lots of condensation. This time I left my whole face exposed and just draped a light towel over it for warmth.

There was no serious condensation. I was able to sleep comfortably all night in ordinary street clothes. Did an excellent job of stopping the wind. Areas covered by the doubled over wool blanket were warm. Areas only covered by the bivy were cool but not intolerably so.

In the past I have used the same bivy with a liner sack instead of a wool blanket comfortably down to 50 F. Now I know many of you are quite comfortable sleeping naked on the ground in freezing rain, however I like to be warm and 50 F without protection would leave me hypothermic by dawn.



Sea to Summit has this liner in a variety of temperature ranges. This is the lightweight one, supposedly increases bag rating by 14 F. Other liners claim greater warmth factors. The main problem with the bag liner is that it has no side zipper. You have to pull it up like a large sock and then get into the bivy. The bivy zipper only goes about a third of its length so pulling the bivy up at the same time as the liner is the easiest way to do it. Then you kind of flop onto the pad.

Note that sleeping directly on the ground without a pad would leave you a lot colder. Should it rain, you have a few issues. Foremost is that it is impossible to cover up completely. At the least you'll need to have your nose and mouth exposed or you'll have very bad condensation inside. The zipper is not waterproof so maybe you Jerry-rig a plastic flap over it or roll it over slightly to get it under you. The seams need to be treated with seam sealant. You won't have room for any but the smallest of possessions inside with you. Hope you enjoy lying flat because curling up in a fetal position isn't practical. That's unfortunate because the fetal position is the warmest position to sleep in.

I always take the liner and the bivy on my day hikes and backpacks. Not too long ago I was caught in a dreadful downpour with a leaky bivy but was able to keep my bag dry inside the bivy within the bivy.

https://www.survivalistboards.com/sho...06#post7772206
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