This winter has been a reality check... - Survivalist Forum
Survivalist Forum

Advertise Here

Go Back   Survivalist Forum > > >
Articles Classifieds Donations Gallery Groups Links Store Survival Files


Notices

Advertise Here
Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Bug out in a winter cold spell in England -ideas? rghal British Isles and ROI 6 11-14-2017 07:19 AM
What would you do in an all-out war situation? Crunchyness Urban Survival 140 08-30-2017 11:10 AM
Preppers: Check Seed Germination Rates AllOutdoor.com AllOutdoor.com 0 05-02-2017 08:30 AM
Winter Wilderness Bug out unknownprepper Canada 24 02-04-2017 10:36 AM

Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
Old 03-24-2018, 02:43 PM
jihiggs jihiggs is offline
Hunter
 
Join Date: Nov 2013
Location: east South Dakota
Posts: 1,319
Thanks: 386
Thanked 1,294 Times in 606 Posts
Default This winter has been a reality check...



Advertise Here

Hello fellow keloland dwellers! I've just moved here from WA in december, where it never got colder than 20 degrees. I've had to deal with some things I never considered before.

Storage of batteries:
I checked my batteries, and 1/4 of my Aaa batteries had leaked. They were not discharged at all, which leads me to believe they leaked do to freezing. Also, I was gifted a stanley jump pack with compressor, the battery failed by January. Is it unreasonable to store an sla battery in my car? All I can figure is it slid in my trunk and turned on at some point, draining the battery, then in its discharged state it froze. I went to use it, discovering it was dead so I plugged it in to charge. I've read a sure way to kill an sla battery is to charge it while it's frozen.

Storage of water: I knew this would be a problem.. But... How the heck do Yall store large quantities of water if you can't heat the space you store it in?

Duct tape:
To my surprise, this stuff doesn't stick worth crap when it's cold. It actually started falling off the roll when I tried to get some. Any other product like duct tape that can work in - 30?

Clothing:
I have had a hard time finding a ballance between something that blocks the wind but I won't sweat to death in. In WA, when it was cold I would wear a cotton beanie, and take it off if I started sweating. I did that here when I was working in my storage unit, but as soon as I stepped into the wind, my hair froze. I have replaced it with wool, I can keep it on while sweating and not feeling like a wet mop.

Plastics:
I have found that at these Temps, some plastics crumble like this glass when impacted. What plastics are good down to - 30?

Frozen mud in my tires:
I never had to deal with this before cause I'm a city boy, but my folks live out in the sticks, with lots of dirt roads twice now I have gotten mud trapped in the wheel that causes a bad vibration at speed. Is that just something I need to live with? Sure I could use a hose and spray it out, but my dad doesn't want to use it when it's cold.
Quick reply to this message
The Following 4 Users Say Thank You to jihiggs For This Useful Post:
Old 03-24-2018, 03:12 PM
zumhug's Avatar
zumhug zumhug is offline
Paramedic and ΜΟΛΩΝ ΛΑΒΕ
 
Join Date: Mar 2017
Location: United States
Posts: 3,053
Thanks: 7,845
Thanked 5,962 Times in 2,023 Posts
Default

All really amazing "ahhh moments" especially when you move to a climate you aren't used too. This winter was nasty for so many. It should be an eye-opener to many of us.
Quick reply to this message
The Following User Says Thank You to zumhug For This Useful Post:
Old 03-25-2018, 12:29 AM
jihiggs jihiggs is offline
Hunter
 
Join Date: Nov 2013
Location: east South Dakota
Posts: 1,319
Thanks: 386
Thanked 1,294 Times in 606 Posts
Default

was it particularly bad? cause i heard it is usually colder. im east river.
Quick reply to this message
The Following User Says Thank You to jihiggs For This Useful Post:
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
Old 03-25-2018, 07:19 PM
Toyboy Toyboy is offline
Midwest Born
 
Join Date: Dec 2017
Posts: 696
Thanks: 215
Thanked 906 Times in 399 Posts
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by jihiggs View Post
Hello fellow keloland dwellers! I've just moved here from WA in december, where it never got colder than 20 degrees. I've had to deal with some things I never considered before.

Storage of batteries:
I checked my batteries, and 1/4 of my Aaa batteries had leaked. They were not discharged at all, which leads me to believe they leaked do to freezing. Also, I was gifted a stanley jump pack with compressor, the battery failed by January. Is it unreasonable to store an sla battery in my car? All I can figure is it slid in my trunk and turned on at some point, draining the battery, then in its discharged state it froze. I went to use it, discovering it was dead so I plugged it in to charge. I've read a sure way to kill an sla battery is to charge it while it's frozen.

I.never store extra batteries in the cold.


Storage of water: I knew this would be a problem.. But... How the heck do Yall store large quantities of water if you can't heat the space you store it in?

Yes,leave bit of room for it to freeze/thaw. A small cooler full of water bottles helps keep them warmer and will contain water if they do freeze.

Duct tape:
To my surprise, this stuff doesn't stick worth crap when it's cold. It actually started falling off the roll when I tried to get some. Any other product like duct tape that can work in - 30?



Try gorilla tape

Clothing:
I have had a hard time finding a ballance between something that blocks the wind but I won't sweat to death in. In WA, when it was cold I would wear a cotton beanie, and take it off if I started sweating. I did that here when I was working in my storage unit, but as soon as I stepped into the wind, my hair froze. I have replaced it with wool, I can keep it on while sweating and not feeling like a wet mop.

No way around it you need layers. A base layer, regular clothes, Then I always go with a sweat shirt before my heavy coat. Unzip and/or peal off layers when u get warm. Head covering is a must


Plastics:
I have found that at these Temps, some plastics crumble like this glass when impacted. What plastics are good down to - 30?

No idea

Frozen mud in my tires:
I never had to deal with this before cause I'm a city boy, but my folks live out in the sticks, with lots of dirt roads twice now I have gotten mud trapped in the wheel that causes a bad vibration at speed. Is that just something I need to live with? Sure I could use a hose and spray it out, but my dad doesn't want to use it when it's cold.
Inside the wheel or between tire and wheel well? I knock mine out with a stick. My other answers are inside the quote
Quick reply to this message
The Following User Says Thank You to Toyboy For This Useful Post:
Old 03-25-2018, 08:49 PM
jihiggs jihiggs is offline
Hunter
 
Join Date: Nov 2013
Location: east South Dakota
Posts: 1,319
Thanks: 386
Thanked 1,294 Times in 606 Posts
Default

on the inside of the rims, not something i could just knock out.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Toyboy View Post
Inside the wheel or between tire and wheel well? I knock mine out with a stick. My other answers are inside the quote
Quick reply to this message
Old 03-26-2018, 02:11 AM
Aerindel's Avatar
Aerindel Aerindel is offline
Abnormality biased.
 
Join Date: Dec 2017
Location: Montananistan.
Posts: 8,503
Thanks: 11,356
Thanked 23,692 Times in 6,788 Posts
Default

Use a weed burner to heat up your wheels. I did this all the time in Alaska, and even sometimes in Montana. Some wheel designs are worse than others for this.
Quick reply to this message
The Following 2 Users Say Thank You to Aerindel For This Useful Post:
Old 03-27-2018, 04:05 AM
Potawami II Potawami II is online now
Survivor
 
Join Date: Nov 2015
Location: Michigan
Posts: 3,188
Thanks: 22,915
Thanked 7,042 Times in 2,269 Posts
Default

Car battery: Buy an Interstate. They make a regular and a heavy duty. Get the heavy duty and get it one size bigger than your car calls for. When it's -35 and the wind bringing it down farther you don't want to be ****ing around in the dark trying to get your car started for work.

Tires. Buy an all terrain or snow that is up to you but don't mess around get good ones and get heavier than normal. I would get 8 ply if you're not hauling anything heavy and 10 ply if you are. In fact I do keep 8 on the wife's SUV and 10 on my truck. Cold is just as hard on tires as the extreme heat of the southwest plus yearly temp swings from -30 to pushing +100 is really asking a lot of that rubber. Changing a tire at -30 is not something you want to do.

Every fall pop the hood and check your car over. Even if you aren't the mechanical type you can at least check the lines running from your radiator for signs of dry rot or damage. Breaking down can be deadly especially in a sparsely populated area.

Cabala's sells clothing with wind stop technology. I have tried some of it and it's pretty good. I'm sure competitors make something similar.

Wrap water bottles in towels and pack into a cooler. This will protect them from all but the worst of the cold.

Stick a couple Sterno cans and a Stove in the car somewhere. It can be used in the car to thaw frozen water and to keep you from freezing to death.

Last edited by Potawami II; 03-27-2018 at 04:06 AM.. Reason: Auto correct
Quick reply to this message
The Following User Says Thank You to Potawami II For This Useful Post:
Old 03-27-2018, 07:21 AM
NW GUY's Avatar
NW GUY NW GUY is online now
Born 120 years too late.
 
Join Date: Mar 2018
Posts: 3,792
Thanks: 107
Thanked 12,192 Times in 2,977 Posts
Default

ONE COLD weather thing I do plus it really saves vehicle electrical systems, as in you never have to replace any electrical parts, Seriously, I have a 2000 Jeep Cherokee with 170,000+ on it and nothing electrical ever goes wrong, same for the trucks.

I install a dual battery system in my vehicles, run them in parallel and NO isolator between them. In a regular car you might have to get creative for placement. Most truck or SUV types have room for a second under the hood. For my Wrangler I had to mount the second battery inside the passenger compartment behind me because I didn't want to go with those gelcell types that while fitting have a checkered reliability history. MY connection uses 2 gauge welding cable to carry the load. I replace the stock battery with 2 new matched Interstate batteries, you want new matched batteries so one does not act parasitic on the other.

Also having that much amperage parts are not damaged by having too little juice running to them which is very harmful to a veh electrical system.

I have been in northern Quebec caribou hunting when it was around -50 and windchill in -70 range one night. I had to jump every vehicle in the camp the next day, diesel or gas.

My vehicles always start no matter how cold

These are the type connectors I use. Most auto parts places sell them and they are great quick connect for things like winches or jumper cables etc...

https://www.parts-express.com/4-awg-...ector--263-192
Quick reply to this message
The Following 2 Users Say Thank You to NW GUY For This Useful Post:
Old 03-27-2018, 01:27 PM
average_sapien average_sapien is offline
Newbie
 
Join Date: Oct 2017
Location: North Central SD
Posts: 16
Thanks: 149
Thanked 18 Times in 10 Posts
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by jihiggs View Post
Storage of water: I knew this would be a problem.. But... How the heck do Yall store large quantities of water if you can't heat the space you store it in?
Plastics:
I have found that at these Temps, some plastics crumble like this glass when impacted. What plastics are good down to - 30?
I live in North Central SD and am in the same boat with the water storage, if you find something that works you will have to let me know. As for the plastics what are they being used for? There are several different kinds and some are better than others for various tasks.
Quick reply to this message
The Following User Says Thank You to average_sapien For This Useful Post:
Old 03-27-2018, 05:38 PM
jihiggs jihiggs is offline
Hunter
 
Join Date: Nov 2013
Location: east South Dakota
Posts: 1,319
Thanks: 386
Thanked 1,294 Times in 606 Posts
Default

plastic storage totes, some old zip ties i had, but newer zip ties are fine. im told they bury the water lines 6 feet here, thats not a reasonable solution for me. only other thing i can think of is something like an aquarium heater with a solar backup. large containers, like 55 gallons should take a really long time to freeze.
Quick reply to this message
Old 03-28-2018, 08:52 AM
bigdogmom's Avatar
bigdogmom bigdogmom is offline
Trapper
 
Join Date: Aug 2015
Age: 49
Posts: 831
Thanks: 106
Thanked 1,415 Times in 547 Posts
Default

I live in Central Oregon and struggle with water storage in the winter. One of the very last things I do every fall is rotate my 7-gallon water jugs and put them in the house. I have about 8 of them...enough to get me through a power outage, but nothing long term.

Here is my plan. This is one of my Spring/Summer projects.

We have a big shop. It does have a woodstove but it takes HOURS to heat up and it very cold in the winter. I am going to do one of two things this year.

Option one: buy a shipping container that fits across the back wall and outfit it with a heat source. Build shelves in a for water, paint, caulking and anything else that needs to stay above freezing.

Option two would be similar but build a storage area in the back of the shop. You could also use an insulated cargo trailer for this.

My long term plan is to build a Walipini (in ground greenhouse) and line the walls with 50 gallon drums. The theory here is the sun will warm during the day and they will keep the greenhouse warm at night. Still working on this, but it is on my list.

For paint, caulking, and other things normal people store in garages use an old refrigerator with a light bulb. Since they are sealed, the light bulb will keep it above freezing with minimal energy use.

Sent from my SM-G930V using Tapatalk
Quick reply to this message
The Following User Says Thank You to bigdogmom For This Useful Post:
Old 03-29-2018, 10:10 PM
ConradCa ConradCa is offline
Hunter
 
Join Date: Nov 2013
Posts: 1,124
Thanks: 1,268
Thanked 1,135 Times in 522 Posts
Default

Polypropylene thermal underwear, pants and shirt, that clings tightly to your body over your underwear makes a huge difference.

Hands: Silk gloves, ski globes with outer mitten shells for hands.

Bottom: Underwear, thermal underwear pants, blue jeans, ski pants.

Top: Undershirt, thermal underwear shirt, long sleeved shirt, wool sweater, down jacket, windbreaker.

Head: Silk ski mask, thick polypropylene ski mask
Quick reply to this message
The Following User Says Thank You to ConradCa For This Useful Post:
Old 03-30-2018, 09:34 AM
Gulcher Gulcher is online now
Homesteader
 
Join Date: Aug 2010
Posts: 2,519
Thanks: 1,375
Thanked 5,124 Times in 1,662 Posts
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by jihiggs View Post
on the inside of the rims, not something i could just knock out.
Take it to the car wash
Quick reply to this message
The Following User Says Thank You to Gulcher For This Useful Post:
Old 03-30-2018, 12:26 PM
Dragunov's Avatar
Dragunov Dragunov is offline
TEXAS!!!
 
Join Date: Oct 2010
Location: The Great Republic of Texas!
Posts: 7,224
Thanks: 10,760
Thanked 11,391 Times in 4,385 Posts
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by jihiggs View Post
Hello fellow keloland dwellers! I've just moved here from WA in december, where it never got colder than 20 degrees. I've had to deal with some things I never considered before.

Storage of batteries:
I checked my batteries, and 1/4 of my Aaa batteries had leaked. They were not discharged at all, which leads me to believe they leaked do to freezing. Also, I was gifted a stanley jump pack with compressor, the battery failed by January. Is it unreasonable to store an sla battery in my car? All I can figure is it slid in my trunk and turned on at some point, draining the battery, then in its discharged state it froze. I went to use it, discovering it was dead so I plugged it in to charge. I've read a sure way to kill an sla battery is to charge it while it's frozen.

Storage of water: I knew this would be a problem.. But... How the heck do Yall store large quantities of water if you can't heat the space you store it in?

Duct tape:
To my surprise, this stuff doesn't stick worth crap when it's cold. It actually started falling off the roll when I tried to get some. Any other product like duct tape that can work in - 30?

Clothing:
I have had a hard time finding a ballance between something that blocks the wind but I won't sweat to death in. In WA, when it was cold I would wear a cotton beanie, and take it off if I started sweating. I did that here when I was working in my storage unit, but as soon as I stepped into the wind, my hair froze. I have replaced it with wool, I can keep it on while sweating and not feeling like a wet mop.

Plastics:
I have found that at these Temps, some plastics crumble like this glass when impacted. What plastics are good down to - 30?

Frozen mud in my tires:
I never had to deal with this before cause I'm a city boy, but my folks live out in the sticks, with lots of dirt roads twice now I have gotten mud trapped in the wheel that causes a bad vibration at speed. Is that just something I need to live with? Sure I could use a hose and spray it out, but my dad doesn't want to use it when it's cold.
Answer:
Move to Texas.
Quick reply to this message
Old 03-30-2018, 04:05 PM
jihiggs jihiggs is offline
Hunter
 
Join Date: Nov 2013
Location: east South Dakota
Posts: 1,319
Thanks: 386
Thanked 1,294 Times in 606 Posts
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Gulcher View Post
Take it to the car wash
there are no open car wash stations when its that cold
Quick reply to this message
Old 03-30-2018, 04:48 PM
sonya1's Avatar
sonya1 sonya1 is offline
Survivor
 
Join Date: May 2012
Location: Virginia
Posts: 7,168
Thanks: 5,685
Thanked 13,532 Times in 4,684 Posts
Default

We did not have -30 here, but we live in SW Virginia, where it is NOT supposed to be -5 for a week. We were not prepared for this sort of cold. This winter has been hard and we had a hard time. Thankfully we didn't lose any animals except one goat kid that was deformed anyway.

Things we are definitely doing different next winter ( um, if this one IS over...we had 2 feet of snow last week...)
Absolutely NO goat kids or lambs until April ( the fencing is going to be fixed , even if we have to put a 8 ft electric prison fence around the property)

MORE firewood

We are going to stop heating water in pots and put in a proper hot water heater ( attached to a wood stove)

Space heater in milk house

more solar panels so we don't have to drag the generator from the barn to the house ( a steep slope on dirt road) and back ( no power at barn, no power at house for most of March due to snow, lightening and wind, not kidding , still not fixed)

Stock up on WAY MORE hay and straw earlier

this is a big one, work on getting son a 4wd, so he can get to school and work and back
Quick reply to this message
The Following User Says Thank You to sonya1 For This Useful Post:
Old 03-30-2018, 05:25 PM
charliemeyer007's Avatar
charliemeyer007 charliemeyer007 is online now
reluctant sinner
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Location: Rent Free in your head
Posts: 15,816
Thanks: 34
Thanked 29,559 Times in 10,295 Posts
Default

You need to wax the areas that you don't want mud to stick to before winter like at Thanksgiving. I spray my door gaskets with WD-40 then too so my doors don't freeze shut. I spray the lock mechanism too. Never use your emergency brake to park for long as it can also freeze and render you car inoperable.

Carry a small ice chest. Put in hot water bottles, it will say liquid for the day, take it in at night.

-30 isn't all cold. Maybe you should look at different container materials, such as metal, wood and fabric instead of plastic.

Don't fill the water storage containers and just let them freeze.

Keep your battery charged - cut and pasted - Good chance a frozen lead acid battery is ruined by the physical damage. Charging when frozen could rupture it due to hydrogen gas generated can't easily escape until it blows.
At a 40% state of charge, electrolyte will freeze if the temperature drops to approximately -16 degrees F. When a battery is fully charged the electrolyte will not freeze until the temperature drops to approximately -92 degrees F.

Its not just your hat. You need work all your clothing layers and your work output to keep from sweating. Having a towel to mop up the sweat off your head keeps it from running down into your shirt and then pants.

Lithium cells due better in the cold, they cost more or you could just take your stuff inside every night instead of leaving it to freeze.
Quick reply to this message
Old 03-30-2018, 10:23 PM
Tactical Lever's Avatar
Tactical Lever Tactical Lever is offline
Wearing fur underwears...
 
Join Date: Feb 2013
Location: NW of most; in God's country
Posts: 2,501
Thanks: 4,896
Thanked 2,408 Times in 1,230 Posts
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by jihiggs View Post
Hello fellow keloland dwellers! I've just moved here from WA in december, where it never got colder than 20 degrees. I've had to deal with some things I never considered before.

Storage of batteries:
I checked my batteries, and 1/4 of my Aaa batteries had leaked. They were not discharged at all, which leads me to believe they leaked do to freezing. Also, I was gifted a stanley jump pack with compressor, the battery failed by January. Is it unreasonable to store an sla battery in my car? All I can figure is it slid in my trunk and turned on at some point, draining the battery, then in its discharged state it froze. I went to use it, discovering it was dead so I plugged it in to charge. I've read a sure way to kill an sla battery is to charge it while it's frozen.
Not unreasonable to store a lead acid battery in your car. If that was the case, many people would have a heck of a time starting up in the winter. I don't know whether it kills a battery worse trying to charge it while it's frozen, but discharging it, and then getting it real good and cold usually does it.

I haven't had too much problem that I can recall storing NiCad batteries, in the cold. I'm sure I've had them below -40 with no ill effects. Though they really don't last long in the cold. Lithium Ion are much better at being freeze proof.

Have not read many good reviews on many of the jump starters. And usually the combo deals cheap out on all the add ons.

I carry good lights, and a decent air compressor. Wish I could tell you what brand, but saying it's a Motomaster "Deluxe" (or something) from Canadian Tire probably won't mean much. I also carry a spare or two for battery connections. Along with jumpers, it's probably a better bet to just carry a spare battery, and make sure it's charged up now and then.

Keeping the terminals clean and running a good pure synthetic oil makes all the difference in the cold.

Quote:
Storage of water: I knew this would be a problem.. But... How the heck do Yall store large quantities of water if you can't heat the space you store it in?
Storage where? You could just fill part way and let it freeze, or if you have electricity to burn, a pail heater will keep it warm.

Quote:
Duct tape:
To my surprise, this stuff doesn't stick worth crap when it's cold. It actually started falling off the roll when I tried to get some. Any other product like duct tape that can work in - 30?
Depends a little on the brand I think. Tuck tape is better, but at -30 C not much is good, and at -50 C I don't think there is anything that will work.

Quote:
Clothing:
I have had a hard time finding a ballance between something that blocks the wind but I won't sweat to death in. In WA, when it was cold I would wear a cotton beanie, and take it off if I started sweating. I did that here when I was working in my storage unit, but as soon as I stepped into the wind, my hair froze. I have replaced it with wool, I can keep it on while sweating and not feeling like a wet mop.
Vents and layers. Leather and wool works well, but there is nothing wrong with synthetics now, other than they don't work great if you get them wet.

Quote:
Plastics:
I have found that at these Temps, some plastics crumble like this glass when impacted. What plastics are good down to - 30?
Frozen mud in my tires:

Probably polyethylene. Some of it (maybe all?) is good at very cold temperatures.

Quote:
I never had to deal with this before cause I'm a city boy, but my folks live out in the sticks, with lots of dirt roads twice now I have gotten mud trapped in the wheel that causes a bad vibration at speed. Is that just something I need to live with? Sure I could use a hose and spray it out, but my dad doesn't want to use it when it's cold.
If you have big tires, it's a huge help to have them bead balanced. The beads inside self balance and really make up for the errant clump of mud.

I have used a spray lube, on the inside of the rim, and it seems to help.


Just noticed that I am commenting in a South Dakota section. Hope it's okay that I am commenting from somewhere colder...
Quick reply to this message
The Following 2 Users Say Thank You to Tactical Lever For This Useful Post:
Old 04-02-2018, 07:44 PM
Steve_In_29 Steve_In_29 is offline
Semper Fi
 
Join Date: Oct 2012
Location: St John's, AZ
Posts: 7,949
Thanks: 10,353
Thanked 17,653 Times in 5,481 Posts
Default

How much water are you wanting to store? Bury a cistern about 6 feet down and it will never freeze. Keep the plumbing for it at the same depth until it can be brought above ground in a warmer area such as a basement/crawlspace.

Wool and synthetics work well at keeping you warm but wool works better when wet. Layers of clothes are what you are looking for. Layers that you ACTIVELY manage, as in taking off some items as you warm up from exertion BEFORE you start sweating and then putting them back on as you cool down.

Also you need things like underarm vents you can open in your wind/waterproof outer layer to aid in removing excess moisture and providing a way to vent heat when conditions don't allow for removal of the outer layer.
Quick reply to this message
Old 04-02-2018, 09:20 PM
kayakjohn kayakjohn is offline
Hiker
 
Join Date: Mar 2017
Posts: 605
Thanks: 1,594
Thanked 1,162 Times in 386 Posts
Default

i grew up in SD from 1979 to 1991, from 10 years old to 22. i remember playing outside in -30, -40 through the day. the coldest ive ever been out in was , i think the winter of 88/89, february i believe, with the windchill it came to 80 below. that day i had to walk about a mile to the bank & store. the oil in my pan turned to vaseline, we had to drag the car behind my dads in gear to get it to warm up enough.
Quick reply to this message
Reply

Bookmarks



Quick Reply
Message:
Options

Register Now

In order to be able to post messages on the Survivalist Forum forums, you must first register.
Please enter your desired user name, your email address and other required details in the form below.
User Name:
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.
Password:
Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.
Email Address:
Gender
Insurance
Please select your insurance company (Optional)

Log-in

Human Verification

In order to verify that you are a human and not a spam bot, please enter the answer into the following box below based on the instructions contained in the graphic.



Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 03:53 PM.


Powered by vBulletin®
Copyright ©2000 - 2020, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Search Engine Optimisation provided by DragonByte SEO (Lite) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2020 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.
vBulletin Security provided by vBSecurity v2.2.2 (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2020 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.
Copyright © Kevin Felts 2006 - 2015,
Green theme by http://www.themesbydesign.net