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Old 07-28-2014, 03:12 PM
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Hello all,

I've been fooling around with two things a lot lately, and those are my new work sharp KTS and my Gerber parang.

Now, I know the Bear Grylls line of merchandise doesn't get much love, but even it has a few goodies. This parang has been working pretty well for me in yard work (i.e. clearing excess bamboo, getting rid of larger vines and weeds, and even chopping up some chunks of trees that had fallen in a big storm). It held up pretty well, but the fact that it's hollow ground worries me. My understanding is that a hollow grind slices well because it's thin, but has high risk of folding over for the same reason.

So, here's my idea. I want to completely reprofile the parang. I have the compact parang, as well, and I intend to practice on it first. I'm thinking that I want to grind it down to completely eliminate the hollow grind (being careful not to hurt the heat treat, of course) and give it a 40 degree convex grind, then use the outdoor guide to give it a 50 degree convex edge for some added sturdiness.

Has anyone heard of someone doing this? The compact parang is cheap, so I'm not too worried about messing it up in my little experiment. Any ideas or tips?

Thanks,
TheDancingSousa
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Old 07-28-2014, 03:38 PM
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You should ask the guys at the blade forums. I seriously doubt you'll receive any constructive advice here...jmho. I didn't even realize the BG parang had a hollow grind (design flaw right off the bat). My son bought the compact one last year...seems that he likes it.

DomC
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Old 07-28-2014, 09:44 PM
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you would be better off, getting a piece of knife grade steel or stainless, use that one as a pattern and cut out and grind, as well as sharpen and temper your own. you wont ruin what you have, and you can learn a lot about making the knife you carry. there might come a point in time, where those skills learned now, when things are plentiful, could carry you a long way, when things are not.
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Old 07-29-2014, 08:43 AM
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I don't have the supplies, funding, or connections to even begin to learn doing that right. I don't want to be a knife maker. I just want to take the tools and knowledge in my possession and make the most of them.

If I need to make a tool after SHTF, then you can bet your sweet fanny that I'm going for stones and wood to make my tools in a way that I know and understand fully, the way my pappaw taught me.
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Old 07-30-2014, 12:10 AM
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if you cut it back that far, you will probably have to retemper it. depends how gerber originally heat treated it.
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Old 07-30-2014, 11:09 AM
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I used to be a huge fan of Gerber, at least the US made, higher dollar ones; i even own a few that I still treasure despite moving on to another company.

I have looked at the Gerber BG Parang and have wondered why the blade is angled back instead of with a slightly forward angle? It seems that this blade configuration would have potential to damage the wrist? the blade would hit the wood AFTER the hand passed it, causing torque to whiplash the wrist? no? yes? I've never used one like this.
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Old 07-30-2014, 11:35 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Borrowed time View Post
I used to be a huge fan of Gerber, at least the US made, higher dollar ones; i even own a few that I still treasure despite moving on to another company.

I have looked at the Gerber BG Parang and have wondered why the blade is angled back instead of with a slightly forward angle? It seems that this blade configuration would have potential to damage the wrist? the blade would hit the wood AFTER the hand passed it, causing torque to whiplash the wrist? no? yes? I've never used one like this.
Because they are trying to copy a true parang.

Check out Condor's lineup:
http://www.condortk.com/products.php...uctos=26&cat=2

or Valiant
http://www.valiantco.com/

or Traditional Filipino
http://traditionalfilipinoweapons.com/Index.html
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Old 07-30-2014, 02:39 PM
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I believe that the blade is angled back so that there is more of a slicing action as opposed to a kukri which is angled forward for chopping.
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Old 07-30-2014, 06:19 PM
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Traditionally speaking, the middle section of the blade was used when chopping. The portion near the handle was used for whittling, and the portion towards the end was used for scalping. I think that was it anyways. It's a malaysian tool. When chopping, the blade shape keeps your knuckles away from whatever you're chopping.
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Old 07-30-2014, 07:44 PM
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Quote:
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Traditionally speaking, the middle section of the blade was used when chopping. The portion near the handle was used for whittling, and the portion towards the end was used for scalping. I think that was it anyways. It's a malaysian tool. When chopping, the blade shape keeps your knuckles away from whatever you're chopping.
I think you mean chopping off heads and not scalping--practice common throughout the Indonesia area from New Guinea to the Philippines and to Vietnam and Burma (Myanmar)--see Headhunters of Borneo.
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Old 07-30-2014, 08:41 PM
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and remembering the pyramid's of skulls around Cambodia, they did it quite effectively most of tha population probably don't remember Pol Pot
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Old 07-30-2014, 09:26 PM
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Actually, I meant skinning, as it turns out.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Parang_%28knife%29

http://www.rainforestoutdoor.com/p/parang-machete.html
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Old 08-02-2014, 03:37 AM
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I had one of these BG parangs for a little while but it just didn't seem to work well for me in my neck of the woods. Just wouldn't cut the blackberry vines we have here, which seemed odd since I thought vine were more or less what a parang was for. But to answer your question about the hollow grind, I had a 10 bowie knife that had hollow ground that I tried using to cut some saplings with. It cut through the first few effortlessly, but on the last one it caught funny and a section of the blade the width of the sapling bowed out like I'd hit it with a hammer. Don't use a hollow grind for brush work.
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Old 08-02-2014, 09:45 AM
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I managed to grind it back a little more than halfway before my first low grit belt wore down. I ordered some new belts that came in yesterday and plan on finishing it up in the next couple days. The convex grind, in my opinion, looks a lot nicer than the hollow grind did, anyways.
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