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Old 10-18-2017, 12:31 AM
justin22885 justin22885 is offline
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Default ferro rods in a flintlock?



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would it work? you can buy ferro rod blanks for like $1 for a 1/2x2" piece, many sizes available and they are dirt cheap, but would one of these actually work in lieu of a flint in a flintlock?.. it seems a frizzen SHOULD generate spark, but i havent tried it
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Old 10-18-2017, 04:36 AM
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Too Hot, if you can ignite magnesium, you can pit the gun metal. Also chemical oxidadtion to the metal of the gun. Flint is far more inert.

Also risk of damaging other things from hot overspray.
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Old 10-18-2017, 06:51 AM
богдан богдан is offline
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Too Hot, if you can ignite magnesium, you can pit the gun metal. Also chemical oxidadtion to the metal of the gun. Flint is far more inert.

Also risk of damaging other things from hot overspray.
I also do not think those rods are very impact resistant
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Old 10-18-2017, 10:06 AM
dcliffhanger dcliffhanger is offline
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It will work, I have done it.

But like the above posts, not a good idea for regular use.

As for the impact resistance, well flint/chert also breaks every time it strikes the frizzen. That is why it has to be sharpened on a regular basis and most flints are only good for a few shots before they have to be retouched.
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Old 10-18-2017, 12:04 PM
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It will work, I have done it.

But like the above posts, not a good idea for regular use.

As for the impact resistance, well flint/chert also breaks every time it strikes the frizzen. That is why it has to be sharpened on a regular basis and most flints are only good for a few shots before they have to be retouched.
I am aware. but I think for a total durability stand point I think flint is more wear resistant so to speak
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Old 10-18-2017, 01:07 PM
justin22885 justin22885 is offline
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well, its not actually the flint that the spark comes from, its the frizzen being scratched resulting in rapid oxidizing and the heat that comes from the reaction, so the temperature off of a flintlock is hot enough to pit metal and cause damage already.. plus eventually the frizzen has to be replaced on top of regular replacements of flint

is the increase in temperature really a bad thing?.. wheellocks used pyrite, not flint, and pyrite works like a ferrocericum rod when it gets scratched by the wheel, and the sparks from that must have been even hotter because the use of sulfur in gunpowder mixture came around to reduce ignition temperatures to make flintlocks more reliable.. wheellocks didnt need it

so benefits of a ferrocericum rod would be theyre cheaper, they are the consumable, the frizzen should last much longer, and the hotter spark should eliminate the need for sulfur should you need to fabricate your own black powder in a survival scenario

ive been toying with the idea of designing a new lock better tailored towards the use of ferrocericum rods for ignition, possibly based off the wheellock ending up something like a large spring-loaded zippo lighter
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Old 10-19-2017, 08:21 PM
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so, do you guys think it might be pursuing a lock that is actually designed to work with ferro rods?.. im sure theres a modern solution to protect the rifle from the heat of the spark as well
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Old 10-20-2017, 07:17 AM
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so, do you guys think it might be pursuing a lock that is actually designed to work with ferro rods?.. im sure theres a modern solution to protect the rifle from the heat of the spark as well
not really the folks who tend to use trad rifles for hunting and the like go for traditional for a reason. there might be a nich market but you never know if you never try
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Old 10-24-2017, 10:39 PM
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so, do you guys think it might be pursuing a lock that is actually designed to work with ferro rods?.. im sure theres a modern solution to protect the rifle from the heat of the spark as well
a modern solution for a traditional flintlock.....cuz ya can always find ferro rods in the wilds..

what dimwit idea...
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Old 10-25-2017, 12:10 AM
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........nice
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Old 10-25-2017, 03:51 AM
Flinter Flinter is offline
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so, do you guys think it might be pursuing a lock that is actually designed to work with ferro rods?.. im sure theres a modern solution to protect the rifle from the heat of the spark as well
It's been done. You can read all about it on the flintlock forums.

It never caught on and I don't think it ever will. It's in the same category as agate flints, ceramic flints, sawn flints....speaking as a man who shoots flintlocks on a regular basis, as long as I can get real flint, what's the point?

The target audience for a product like that won't accept it. As far as I know, there are no states that still require flintlocks to hunt in black powder season. What that means is, guys who use flinters do so because they want to...and trust me, their attachment to their rifles are akin to a Jedi and his light saber. We stand around and brag about accuracy, reliability, wood grain, and flint life.
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Old 11-19-2017, 05:37 PM
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Interesting . My experience with flinders is limited , but I have used that brown flint
I find in prairie . Shatters a bit but it often worked for me .
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