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Old 11-30-2019, 09:54 AM
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My older L2350 compact Kubota became hard to start and I was thinking it was the glow plugs. But the I noticed if I turned it over once before trying the glow plugs helped. I was thinking that maybe I have not gotten the air out of the fuel system on the last filter change.
It turned out the problem was the water pump. The other week the water pump froze up. Now that I have replaced it, all is good. The water pump was making it very hard for the starter to crank and sometime I would have to try the switch more than once for the starter to crank.
So if there are these symptoms, check that water pump is freely turning.

By the way that water pump is an abomination. Has about 15 bolts on it.
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Old 11-30-2019, 10:21 AM
MattB4 MattB4 is offline
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That looks like a difficult replacement job.

I have found that for my little MF GC2300 tractor during the Winter months I need to keep a battery maintainer hooked up to it. Having a fully charged battery really helps with cold weather starts. It also extends the battery life. I was replacing the tractor battery every couple of years before getting the maintainer and since then it has been 6 years since last replacement.

I suppose if I lived in a real cold climate I would want a block heater, but not really necessary where I live.
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Old 11-30-2019, 05:19 PM
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MattB4 That looks like a difficult replacement job.

It was not easy since I did not completely remove the radiator but only loosened it enough to lean it a bit to get at the fan bolts and then water pump.

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Originally Posted by MattB4 View Post
That looks like a difficult replacement job.

I have found that for my little MF GC2300 tractor during the Winter months I need to keep a battery maintainer hooked up to it. Having a fully charged battery really helps with cold weather starts. It also extends the battery life. I was replacing the tractor battery every couple of years before getting the maintainer and since then it has been 6 years since last replacement.

I suppose if I lived in a real cold climate I would want a block heater, but not really necessary where I live.
Live zone 8b nw FL, but that tractor did come with a block heater.
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Old 11-30-2019, 06:04 PM
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Anti freeze also works against boil over. Wow - proper torque sequence isn't obvious.
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Old 11-30-2019, 06:21 PM
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I bought a battery powered ratchet a year ago and it would make short work of all those bolts.

Really makes life easier.

Here is someone's review of the one I bought


Can't find it for sale, but here is something similar looking for only $35!

https://www.ebay.com/itm/12V-Electri...3p7t0QFKsUSMDg

Here is a $55 version.

https://www.ebay.com/itm/Cordless-3-....c100005.m1851
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Old 11-30-2019, 07:11 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MattB4 View Post

I suppose if I lived in a real cold climate I would want a block heater, but not really necessary where I live.
Try a magnetic oil pan heater. Anything that you can do to keep the block/oil warm makes for an easier start/easier on the engine (a good thing for longevity). Plug in about 3hr before planned startup.
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Old 11-30-2019, 09:34 PM
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Originally Posted by Justme11 View Post
I bought a battery powered ratchet a year ago and it would make short work of all those bolts.

Really makes life easier.

Here is someone's review of the one I bought

VonHaus Better Than Milwaukee Cordless? - YouTube

Can't find it for sale, but here is something similar looking for only $35!

https://www.ebay.com/itm/12V-Electri...3p7t0QFKsUSMDg

Here is a $55 version.

https://www.ebay.com/itm/Cordless-3-....c100005.m1851
The space was way too tight to use anything mechanical for torquing.
I just tried to tighten a little at time on each side and made the gasket thicker by adding gasket maker to the outside of the supplied gasket. Used very short wrenches finger, hand, wrist and not shoulders or body to apply torque. Over torque could break that casting if not done equally. sufficient soft permatex and some blue locktite for the bolts. After a day of operation I will go back and check each bolt to see if they are still snug.
I can always torque somemore. I have only run it for 15 minutes so far. I got relative on the plane will bush hog tomorrow. Late enough in the year so that the ground dwelling yellow jackets should gone for the year, at least mostly.
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Old 11-30-2019, 09:46 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by barnetmill View Post
The space was way too tight to use anything mechanical for torquing.
I just tried to tighten a little at time on each side and made the gasket thicker by adding gasket maker to the outside of the supplied gasket. Used very short wrenches finger, hand, wrist and not shoulders or body to apply torque. Over torque could break that casting if not done equally. sufficient soft permatex and some blue locktite for the bolts. After a day of operation I will go back and check each bolt to see if they are still snug.
I can always torque somemore. I have only run it for 15 minutes so far. I got relative on the plane will bush hog tomorrow. Late enough in the year so that the ground dwelling yellow jackets should gone for the year, at least mostly.
wow, doing all those bolts with small wrenches and finger tips sounds like no fun at all!
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Old 11-30-2019, 10:37 PM
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wow, doing all those bolts with small wrenches and finger tips sounds like no fun at all!
That tractor really helps me out with my place since it can bush hog and with the box blade can work some things including very rotted stumps out of the ground.
So the effort of fixing is worth it.
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Old 11-30-2019, 10:55 PM
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Iíll swap ya.
Check out changing a water pump on an F150 Ecoboost.
https://youtu.be/25OyZ9NVn7M
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Old 11-30-2019, 11:12 PM
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I’ll swap ya.
Check out changing a water pump on an F150 Ecoboost.
https://youtu.be/25OyZ9NVn7M


Holy Crap!! Almost better to scrap the truck!
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Old 11-30-2019, 11:54 PM
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Some of the russian made Belarus tractors had a lever that seperated the hydraulic pump drive from the engine so if the hydraulic oil was frozen then it wasnt dragging power from the starter system. (also had a a roll down cover for the radiator that could be operated from the cab)

Some had a removable 2 stroke pony motor that you could keep nice and warm indoors and could carry out to the tractor when required

of course many of the older machines were able to have a small fire in a bucket going under them to help lift engine temps when things really got frozen up
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Old 12-01-2019, 09:08 AM
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Originally Posted by Timbersawz View Post
Some of the russian made Belarus tractors had a lever that seperated the hydraulic pump drive from the engine so if the hydraulic oil was frozen then it wasnt dragging power from the starter system. (also had a a roll down cover for the radiator that could be operated from the cab)

Some had a removable 2 stroke pony motor that you could keep nice and warm indoors and could carry out to the tractor when required

of course many of the older machines were able to have a small fire in a bucket going under them to help lift engine temps when things really got frozen up
There are stories of people positioning the bottom or pan of a truck engine so it was wedged over a compost pile to stay warmer overnight and start in the morning. I have seen little fires when I was younger burning under trucks.
I read one time that there were double pane windows on some russian windshields
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Old 12-01-2019, 12:12 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by barnetmill View Post
There are stories of people positioning the bottom or pan of a truck engine so it was wedged over a compost pile to stay warmer overnight and start in the morning. I have seen little fires when I was younger burning under trucks.
I read one time that there were double pane windows on some russian windshields
ww2 they lit small fires under the tanks
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Old 12-02-2019, 08:16 PM
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I use a old colman catalyic white gas heater sometimes,set it under oilpan then throw a tarp over tractor to hold heat,makes a huge difference when its dang cold and tractor been sitting week or two
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Old 12-02-2019, 08:57 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Copymutt View Post
Iíll swap ya.
Check out changing a water pump on an F150 Ecoboost.
https://youtu.be/25OyZ9NVn7M
Holy crap!

I thought my Ď82 5.0 Ford was bad, I swear every bracket or accessory on that motor was attached to the water pump housing.
But I didnít have to disassemble the motor itself...
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Old 12-02-2019, 09:07 PM
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Over on the Russian front, during one of the lulls (a winter cold snap at -40 something) the Gerry's managed to shoot down a lone rusky strafer. They ask how he got his plane started because nothing in Luftwaffe would start.

He told them he put like 50% gas in the engine oil to thin it enough to start. Then added oil as it warmed up and drove off the gas. They didn't believe him, so he showed them on one of their planes. I don't think anyone wanted to fly that bad.

A truck driver buddy, back in Wisconsin once had to put one of those single use charcoal bbq trays under his truck after an overnight cold snap. He said as soon as the flames died down and the coals were white, he push it under the truck. He kept an eye on it and had a fire extinguisher handy. When the coals were just about out he was able to fire up the truck.

I slid into the berm of my driveway once at about 35 below. I could get the chains on one side but the other side was against the ice wall. Note - Idle with high beams and 2 heater motors running wasn't putting a lot of juice in the battery. I gave up and went to bed. The next morning I went out to start the Land Cruiser. It would sort of turn over and I didn't have any starting fluid.

I took the battery in the house and set by the wood stove for a few hours. It would crank over nicely, but I think LC was flooded. So I looked down threw the carb and could see gas in the aluminium intake manifold. I go get my propane torch and start heating the intake. It never got warm - I could heat a spot for 15 minutes, pull the flame away and stick my bare finger right on that spot, didn't even feel warm.

Then it dawns on me the propane is vaporizing, so I blow out the flame and stick the torch nozzle in the carb. LC fires right up. Later that day I ran a fuel hose from the carb intake to the torch (minus the tip) inside the cab. Turn the torch on, count to 10 and hit the starter. Worked for the weeks of nasty cold.
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Old 12-06-2019, 01:47 PM
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I've started equipment by lighting a fire and once I had some coals I shovels them under the engine I would drape a tarp over the hood of the machine down to the ground to trap as much heat as possible.

When I expected cold I would bring the battery home to keep it warm.

On vehicles that were close enough to run a power cord to but didn't have block heaters I put an electric space heater(one that doesn't have a tip over sensor) under the hood, then a tarp over the hood to trap the heat, I set it on a timer to start a few hours before I had to start the vehicle. I would also put a smaller electric heater on the dash board pointing at the windshield on the same timer. That way the windows didn't need to be scraped and the cab was slightly warmed up.

I have drained the oil to bring into the warm house over night then refill in the morning.

At the moment I don't have much for oooold equipment so I haven't had to do any of those things for 3 or 4 years now. Although the heater in the cab was quite nice.
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