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Old 04-05-2019, 03:22 PM
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Has anyone tried peanut powder? I looked at Emergency Essentials Peanut Powder online and it listed 2g fat per 2 tbsp serving, which seems a bit low.
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Old 04-05-2019, 05:36 PM
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I've used it, and keep a good amount around. It's been used in shakes, cookies and more. Even tried to reconstitute it for a PB & J sandwich. Worked ok, but I need to work on the proportions oil/powder. I'm not sure how long the bulk powder will keep, but I've seen it in #10 cans so it may be good in that form for LTS.
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Old 04-05-2019, 05:55 PM
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I have lots of it, and use it all the time.


I got it for an alternative protein back up as well as cooking.
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Old 04-05-2019, 06:39 PM
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Yep. We store it and my wife uses it in baked goods often. We've never tried making a peanut butter substitute, though.

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Old 04-05-2019, 06:58 PM
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Originally Posted by Eddie_T View Post
Has anyone tried peanut powder? I looked at Emergency Essentials Peanut Powder online and it listed 2g fat per 2 tbsp serving, which seems a bit low.
I have never tried it but I should get a case or two. And wow, they have Chocolate peanut powder also which I must get. I like honey and peanut butter better than most food. Just type peanut in the search box and see all the kinds of peanut powder > https://www.beprepared.com/
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Old 04-05-2019, 07:26 PM
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Has anyone tried peanut powder? I looked at Emergency Essentials Peanut Powder online and it listed 2g fat per 2 tbsp serving, which seems a bit low.
Peanuts have almost no water content. They press them for oil, not water.

Defatted powder is what you want. Removing almost all of the light unsaturated oil is how you get it to store a long time without rancidity.

Defatted peanut powder combined with coconut oil is the way to go LTS.

In fact, that's how the commercial PB spread companies do it. Those jars are usually defatted PB powder mixed with longer lasting cheaper oils, plus flavors and preservatives. That's how they get 2 year shelf lives when the fancy pure versions get only one year. Cheap PB lasts longer than the expensive stuff.

Plus the whole process lets them sell the peanut oil to fry turkeys down south.

You don't have to buy EE cans. Defatted peanut flour is sold by the metric ton commercially for baking.

http://byrdmill.com/?s=peanut&post_type=product
You'll have to mylar pack yourself but the 12% is $5 a pound. You want the 12% version.
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Old 04-05-2019, 11:59 PM
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Thanks Zeke, that makes sense to me. I can't find a peanut butter that I like except for the natural ones. I was just telling my son that all the others I try seem to be too finely ground. So that tells me that with peanut powder I can do as good a mix as ConAgra which makes a lot of commercial brands and if I don't like it just add honey. But for daily use I'll just continue with the natural stir the oil stuff.
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Old 04-06-2019, 04:54 AM
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Thanks Zeke, that makes sense to me. I can't find a peanut butter that I like except for the natural ones. I was just telling my son that all the others I try seem to be too finely ground. So that tells me that with peanut powder I can do as good a mix as ConAgra which makes a lot of commercial brands and if I don't like it just add honey. But for daily use I'll just continue with the natural stir the oil stuff.
Look into Jiff Natural or Skippy Natural spreads. Both are pressed peanut powder mixed with palm oil. Palm oil is a longer lasting oil. Roughly 4 to 5 years.

I can't say if you will like them but they do come in several flavors and they would be good for intermediate storage. Even going with the defatted peanut flour in mylar you won't get more than a few more years over these natural spreads. It's worth giving them a try given the easy logistics compared to ordering commercial defatted flour, packing it in mylar, and then storing coconut oil.

Ha! I give awesome peanut advice. I love the irony because I'm allergic to it. But let's face it, it is serious survival food.
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Old 04-08-2019, 11:29 PM
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I ran out of peanut butter a few days ago. It's been really rough but I didn't want to drive to town just for peanut butter.
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Old 04-11-2019, 06:36 AM
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I have bought from both WallyWorld and Costco, and although one has sugar added, ( can't remember which and am not at home to check), I like it. I usually only mix up enough to put some on my toast, but it tastes good to me. One of my grandchildren likes to mix it up and eat from a spoon...meh. A good source of protein.
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Old 04-11-2019, 01:02 PM
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I have lost all interest in peanut powder as I just tasted Smucker's Natural, ingredients peanuts and salt. It tastes like peanut butter should. My only complaint, it's a bit too thin. I will compare with other naturals until I find one that suits me. One has to read the labels though as the use of "natural" is loosely used by some, namely Peter Pan and Skippy. If you find a natural that doesn't have to be stirred it ain't natural.
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Old 04-11-2019, 03:34 PM
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I have lost all interest in peanut powder as I just tasted Smucker's Natural, ingredients peanuts and salt. It tastes like peanut butter should. My only complaint, it's a bit too thin. I will compare with other naturals until I find one that suits me. One has to read the labels though as the use of "natural" is loosely used by some, namely Peter Pan and Skippy. If you find a natural that doesn't have to be stirred it ain't natural.
Being a purist isn't going to help you here.

Peanut oil is thin and separates from solids. It's a flaw even if it is an indicator that it is peanut oil. Stirring doesn't make it taste better.

If you want longevity then the peanut oil has to go.

They call it natural because they are using palm oil and not a hydrogenated product. Palm oil is naturally a higher viscosity and also won't separate like the hydrogenated. Natural never means pure.

If you want a long term solution then you must accept some kind of compromise. Otherwise you need to start growing your own peanuts. You can't get pure, easy, and long term all at once.
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Old 04-12-2019, 12:16 AM
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Peanuts have almost no water content. They press them for oil, not water.

Defatted powder is what you want. Removing almost all of the light unsaturated oil is how you get it to store a long time without rancidity.

Defatted peanut powder combined with coconut oil is the way to go LTS.

In fact, that's how the commercial PB spread companies do it. Those jars are usually defatted PB powder mixed with longer lasting cheaper oils, plus flavors and preservatives. That's how they get 2 year shelf lives when the fancy pure versions get only one year. Cheap PB lasts longer than the expensive stuff.

Plus the whole process lets them sell the peanut oil to fry turkeys down south.

You don't have to buy EE cans. Defatted peanut flour is sold by the metric ton commercially for baking.

http://byrdmill.com/?s=peanut&post_type=product
You'll have to mylar pack yourself but the 12% is $5 a pound. You want the 12% version.
Is the peanut flour the same as peanut powder and are they made from roasted peanuts, that would make quite a difference if not.

edit: I answered my question on roast by zooming on the bag's label, it is made from roasted peanuts.

I have relented and found use for powder. It could be used to slightly thin natural peanut butter, peanut butter cookies, peanut butter in emergency situations and (don't hit me) maybe even thicken chili.
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Old 04-12-2019, 01:55 AM
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Is the peanut flour the same as peanut powder and are they made from roasted peanuts, that would make quite a difference if not.

edit: I answered my question on roast by zooming on the bag's label, it is made from roasted peanuts.

I have relented and found use for powder. It could be used to slightly thin natural peanut butter, peanut butter cookies, peanut butter in emergency situations and (don't hit me) maybe even thicken chili.
Peanut powder and peanut flour should be the same but the word powder was hijacked because some companies like additives. Peanut flour is just crushed and pressed peanuts that have had fat removed and nothing else nothing else done. Some of these gimmicky companies have added sugar and milk solids, plus powdered vegetable fat, so all you add is water. They now call the latter powder when ages ago commercial kitchens used either word for what now is only flour.

If you want to be sure it is 100% peanut then get flour. You will have to read the label if it says powder.

Dark flour does mean it has been roasted a bit.

Also remember that flour comes in low fat and lower fat but never no fat. You see two fat content levels on the link and most sellers have roughly those two ranges.

Be careful about adding it to 100% peanut butter that has separated. You might just end up with a sticky brick in a glass jar. Oil still likes to separate but you still need enough to stir the solids. Separation is not that there isn't enough peanuts. It's the oil viscosity is so low. More powder isn't going to change the viscosity of oil, only a thicker oil will. That's why those spreads use palm oil now and used hydrogenated in the past.

Unless the jar states added water then more flour is a poor idea. You can't try to outsmart the real 100% peanut butter with extra powder. Spread makers would have tried that trick ages ago because excess flour is less in demand than excess peanut oil. To get it to stay mixed they needed thicker oils.
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Old 04-15-2019, 02:49 AM
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I like it. I use it as a seasoning. I'll sprinkle it on cereal and stuff. Turns those cornflakes into peanut butter cornflakes. But, I've found that it doesn't last very long. Not sure about if you get it nicely sealed in mylar with a good oxygen absorber, but even with the reduced fat once the seal's broken the clock's ticking and it'll get progressively more rancid tasting. I've had to toss most of the powder I've purchased as I usually won't make it half-way through the bottle before the taste is a problem.

If you're going to use it, I'd really suggest you make sure you're using the whole package right away. It's something that really should be in single-serve packets.
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Old 04-15-2019, 10:00 AM
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I like it. I use it as a seasoning. I'll sprinkle it on cereal and stuff. Turns those cornflakes into peanut butter cornflakes. But, I've found that it doesn't last very long. Not sure about if you get it nicely sealed in mylar with a good oxygen absorber, but even with the reduced fat once the seal's broken the clock's ticking and it'll get progressively more rancid tasting. I've had to toss most of the powder I've purchased as I usually won't make it half-way through the bottle before the taste is a problem.

If you're going to use it, I'd really suggest you make sure you're using the whole package right away. It's something that really should be in single-serve packets.
I think I'll stay away from the powder. I suspect the powder being exposed to O₂ during manufacturing and after opening might oxidize more rapidly than if saturated with oil. If that thought has any merit then the natural ground peanut PNB should last longer. I have kept both peanut oil and sesame oil for lengthy periods with no rancidity, but have had experienced rancidity with Peter Pan Simply Ground PNB (which is a misnomer) from United Grocery Outlet.
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Old 04-15-2019, 02:36 PM
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I think I'll stay away from the powder. I suspect the powder being exposed to O₂ during manufacturing and after opening might oxidize more rapidly than if saturated with oil. If that thought has any merit then the natural ground peanut PNB should last longer. I have kept both peanut oil and sesame oil for lengthy periods with no rancidity, but have had experienced rancidity with Peter Pan Simply Ground PNB (which is a misnomer) from United Grocery Outlet.
More peanut oil means a higher concentration going rancid.

In the sealed jar isn't safe. The oil was macerated with it when they ground the peanuts. The oil will continue to go rancid when they cap the jar.

Removing the oil is the only kind of longevity move. Sure, the remaning oil does go rancid but there is far less of it. Then in dry form that you add fresh saturated oil to or the jars that have palm oil will have a total amount of rancid oil that is lower than real peanut butter.

Remember that the initial grinding process is where all the oil damage is done and what I say starts making sense. They don't grind peanuts in an air free zone. The grinding mixes the air with the oil thoroughly and the rancidity clock starts ticking. Nothing stops the rancidification except freezing. But removing as much oil as possible means you can add an oil that goes rancid far slower. The remaining peanut oil still goes rancid regardless but there is far less of it.
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Old 04-15-2019, 02:45 PM
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More peanut oil means a higher concentration going rancid.

In the sealed jar isn't safe. The oil was macerated with it when they ground the peanuts. The oil will continue to go rancid when they cap the jar.

Removing the oil is the only kind of longevity move. Sure, the remaning oil does go rancid but there is far less of it. Then in dry form that you add fresh saturated oil to or the jars that have palm oil will have a total amount of rancid oil that is lower than real peanut butter.

Remember that the initial grinding process is where all the oil damage is done and what I say starts making sense. They don't grind peanuts in an air free zone. The grinding mixes the air with the oil thoroughly and the rancidity clock starts ticking. Nothing stops the rancidification except freezing. But removing as much oil as possible means you can add an oil that goes rancid far slower. The remaining peanut oil still goes rancid regardless but there is far less of it.
How do you explain Colt's experience with powder, and mine with long life of bottled oils and natural PNB. I would think powder has a lot more exposure to O₂ than unpressed peanuts being ground.

I need to qualify, I am not talking long term storage. It would seem that long term preppers need to consider the problem with powder going rancid by repackaging or getting suppliers to address the problem. It would be sad to have stores go rancid.
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Old 04-15-2019, 04:53 PM
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How do you explain Colt's experience with powder, and mine with long life of bottled oils and natural PNB. I would think powder has a lot more exposure to O₂ than unpressed peanuts being ground.

I need to qualify, I am not talking long term storage. It would seem that long term preppers need to consider the problem with powder going rancid by repackaging or getting suppliers to address the problem. It would be sad to have stores go rancid.
I explain it easily. You can't see or taste rancidity at a level worth merit.

It's not an insult. It's just facts about how rancidity works and the inability of the human smell senses to notice the level of rancidification to any useful degree. By the time 99.9 % of humans note rancidity with smell the level is far beyond healthy levels.

Logic is fine sometimes but this is a well known chemical process. When organic oils get exposed to air then rancidity starts. The more it is exposed at the outset the more oxygen is internalized in the oil. Then you have the oil saturation level and temperature that retards the process of rancidification. When you grind a nut you heavily mix air into the oil. 99% of the damage is done right at the outset. Then the free oxygen radicals bounce around in the oil and oxidize the polymer chains. The longer time goes on the more gets damaged. Removing the oil removes the oxidation health threat. The more oil removed the less oxidation threat there is. Any remaining oil still goes rancid but there is simply less of it. Adding a high saturation oil doesn't add to the rancidity threat but it does make the product more useful.

As for people, you can forget trying to sniff it. Only very special people have enhanced smell capability of the level to detect rancidity at a benign level. Think of all the 7 foot people with a good 3 point jump shot. It's that level of rarity. Their nose is their job. If you could detect rancidity at useful levels you would get a high paying job at the food distributors tomorrow. The rest of us just have to trust the lab chemists and their machines.
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Old 04-15-2019, 05:48 PM
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I explain it easily. You can't see or taste rancidity at a level worth merit.

It's not an insult. It's just facts about how rancidity works and the inability of the human smell senses to notice the level of rancidification to any useful degree. By the time 99.9 % of humans note rancidity with smell the level is far beyond healthy levels.

Logic is fine sometimes but this is a well known chemical process. When organic oils get exposed to air then rancidity starts. The more it is exposed at the outset the more oxygen is internalized in the oil. Then you have the oil saturation level and temperature that retards the process of rancidification. When you grind a nut you heavily mix air into the oil. 99% of the damage is done right at the outset. Then the free oxygen radicals bounce around in the oil and oxidize the polymer chains. The longer time goes on the more gets damaged. Removing the oil removes the oxidation health threat. The more oil removed the less oxidation threat there is. Any remaining oil still goes rancid but there is simply less of it. Adding a high saturation oil doesn't add to the rancidity threat but it does make the product more useful.

As for people, you can forget trying to sniff it. Only very special people have enhanced smell capability of the level to detect rancidity at a benign level. Think of all the 7 foot people with a good 3 point jump shot. It's that level of rarity. Their nose is their job. If you could detect rancidity at useful levels you would get a high paying job at the food distributors tomorrow. The rest of us just have to trust the lab chemists and their machines.
Unfortunately our sense of smell is all we have be it powder or natural grind.

I understand the process, I buy pre-cooked Jimmy Dean sausage as pork fat begins the oxidation process during grinding.
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