What did Indians eat for Vit C in the winter? - Survivalist Forum
Survivalist Forum

Advertise Here

Go Back   Survivalist Forum > >
Articles Classifieds Donations Gallery Groups Links Store Survival Files


Notices

Food and water Discussion on food and water storage, water purification and related topics.

Advertise Here
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
Old 03-20-2020, 02:12 PM
slackercruster's Avatar
slackercruster slackercruster is offline
Hunter
 
Join Date: Feb 2011
Location: Born in L.A. - NYC is 2nd home - Rustbelt is home base
Posts: 1,724
Thanks: 2,355
Thanked 3,340 Times in 1,069 Posts
Default What did Indians eat for Vit C in the winter?



Advertise Here

What did Indians eat for Vit C in the winter?
Quick reply to this message
Old 03-20-2020, 02:16 PM
wellbuilt wellbuilt is offline
Target Shooter
 
Join Date: Apr 2010
Posts: 459
Thanks: 30
Thanked 369 Times in 224 Posts
Default

Pine needs of some sort I think .
Pine needles tea has more Vitamin C than orange juice
Quick reply to this message
The Following 8 Users Say Thank You to wellbuilt For This Useful Post:
Old 03-20-2020, 02:38 PM
Mike46370 Mike46370 is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2020
Posts: 78
Thanks: 19
Thanked 95 Times in 44 Posts
Default

Depends on the tribe, but many cached pumpkins, squashes, etc., according to various explorers and mountaineers. Also, many plains tribes made pemmican, which was a mix of dried pounded meat, tallow, and berries.
Quick reply to this message
The Following 3 Users Say Thank You to Mike46370 For This Useful Post:
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
Old 03-20-2020, 02:43 PM
Jim from 28DaysLater's Avatar
Jim from 28DaysLater Jim from 28DaysLater is offline
....
 
Join Date: Nov 2017
Location: Arklay Mountains
Posts: 1,717
Thanks: 2,554
Thanked 3,421 Times in 1,193 Posts
Default

Good question.

Maybe you don't really get messed up by not having vitamin C for part of the year, if your diet for the rest of the year is ok?

Also, think of the eskimos. I believe they had the most meat-based diet of everybody.

A quick search on vitamin C and meat returned this result: "sufficient amounts of vitamin C can be acquired from raw liver, fish roe and eggs."

So maybe drinking animal blood, or one of those other sources.
Attached Thumbnails
Click image for larger version

Name:	vitamin c.jpg
Views:	35
Size:	31.4 KB
ID:	299878   Click image for larger version

Name:	oranges vitamin c.jpg
Views:	44
Size:	23.3 KB
ID:	299880   Click image for larger version

Name:	spinach vitamin c.jpg
Views:	44
Size:	29.5 KB
ID:	299882   Click image for larger version

Name:	potatoes vitamin c.jpg
Views:	45
Size:	16.5 KB
ID:	299884   Click image for larger version

Name:	blueberries vitamin c.jpg
Views:	41
Size:	14.3 KB
ID:	299886   Click image for larger version

Name:	raspberries.jpg
Views:	42
Size:	15.3 KB
ID:	299888  

Quick reply to this message
The Following 2 Users Say Thank You to Jim from 28DaysLater For This Useful Post:
Old 03-20-2020, 02:51 PM
Jim from 28DaysLater's Avatar
Jim from 28DaysLater Jim from 28DaysLater is offline
....
 
Join Date: Nov 2017
Location: Arklay Mountains
Posts: 1,717
Thanks: 2,554
Thanked 3,421 Times in 1,193 Posts
Default

Just noticing that potatoes have 80% of the vitamin C of oranges. But they're native to South America. I don't think North American Indians had them.

Also searched a little more and found that there are blueberries and grapes that are native to America.

Here are a couple more vitamin C factoids, too. Cranberries are farmed in NJ. I think they might be native to the northeast.
Attached Thumbnails
Click image for larger version

Name:	pawpaw vitamin c.jpg
Views:	38
Size:	57.1 KB
ID:	299890   Click image for larger version

Name:	cranberries vitamin c.jpg
Views:	41
Size:	39.6 KB
ID:	299892  
Quick reply to this message
The Following 4 Users Say Thank You to Jim from 28DaysLater For This Useful Post:
Old 03-20-2020, 03:25 PM
Major Mjolnir Major Mjolnir is online now
Hunter
 
Join Date: Jul 2014
Posts: 1,299
Thanks: 1,905
Thanked 3,091 Times in 978 Posts
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by slackercruster View Post
What did Indians eat for Vit C in the winter?
Any of a number of evergreen tree needles and bark along with some of the perennial tubers they could dig from the ground when it wasn't frozen, prominent among them "Apios americana" aka 'groundnut' and several others. Here is an exceptionally good read on the subject: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2647905/

and: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Aneda
Quick reply to this message
The Following 7 Users Say Thank You to Major Mjolnir For This Useful Post:
Old 03-20-2020, 03:28 PM
Palma's Avatar
Palma Palma is offline
Plays best, alone
 
Join Date: May 2008
Location: Maryland The Free State it aint
Posts: 4,804
Thanks: 4,077
Thanked 5,333 Times in 2,464 Posts
Default

Scurvy takes about 3 months worth of defciencies to take hold.

So with a few adjustments to ones diet you could stay healthey.

Seal or Walrus liver probably helped the Inuits from getting it.
Quick reply to this message
The Following 3 Users Say Thank You to Palma For This Useful Post:
Old 03-20-2020, 04:00 PM
swen_out_west's Avatar
swen_out_west swen_out_west is offline
Survivor
 
Join Date: Apr 2011
Location: N. Wis / High Desert CA/NV
Age: 53
Posts: 4,883
Thanks: 4,969
Thanked 7,518 Times in 2,922 Posts
Default

Actually the Native American did know that the white cedar/arborvitae contained the nutrition they needed for the winters. The French fur trader came to know it as "The tree of life".

However not all cedars/pines are the same anymore with the introduction of some shrubs that are called cedar and pines, that you don't want to ingest. At least I know the one in my front yard is fine because the llama and donkeys shred that thing of all leafs/needles whenever they can.
Quick reply to this message
The Following 5 Users Say Thank You to swen_out_west For This Useful Post:
Old 03-20-2020, 04:11 PM
Aerindel's Avatar
Aerindel Aerindel is offline
Abnormality biased.
 
Join Date: Dec 2017
Location: Montananistan.
Posts: 7,673
Thanks: 9,908
Thanked 20,638 Times in 6,069 Posts
Default

Sheesh people....I guess none of you live on the Rez. Everyone here knows about natural vitamin C.

Rose Hips. A vitamin C superfood that stays edible on the bush all year long. I was chewing on some just the other day along the ditch road. They where a staple food of the natives.

One cup has 900% your daily value.

Just a few berries a day eaten or made into tea and your good, and they stay on the bush all winter with no other preservation needed.

So plentiful up here in Montana I don't grow any or stock vitamin C as year round I can get all I want out my front door, and I'm pretty sure these grow all over the country.
Quick reply to this message
Old 03-20-2020, 04:25 PM
Snyper708's Avatar
Snyper708 Snyper708 is offline
Survivor
 
Join Date: Dec 2017
Location: Eastern North Carolina
Posts: 2,554
Thanks: 0
Thanked 4,066 Times in 1,551 Posts
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by n1d View Post
Do you believe that the NAI gave a hoot about vitamin c, even if they had heard of it?
It doesn't matter if they had heard of it or cared about it.
They were getting it somewhere or they wouldn't have survived.
Quick reply to this message
The Following 7 Users Say Thank You to Snyper708 For This Useful Post:
Old 03-20-2020, 05:03 PM
omegaman13's Avatar
omegaman13 omegaman13 is offline
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2017
Posts: 167
Thanks: 51
Thanked 480 Times in 146 Posts
Default

Spruce tips.
Quick reply to this message
The Following 3 Users Say Thank You to omegaman13 For This Useful Post:
Old 03-20-2020, 05:09 PM
S Roche S Roche is offline
COF
 
Join Date: May 2016
Location: NE
Posts: 347
Thanks: 280
Thanked 548 Times in 217 Posts
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Aerindel View Post
Sheesh people....I guess none of you live on the Rez. Everyone here knows about natural vitamin C.

Rose Hips. A vitamin C superfood that stays edible on the bush all year long. I was chewing on some just the other day along the ditch road. They where a staple food of the natives.

One cup has 900% your daily value.

Just a few berries a day eaten or made into tea and your good, and they stay on the bush all winter with no other preservation needed.

So plentiful up here in Montana I don't grow any or stock vitamin C as year round I can get all I want out my front door, and I'm pretty sure these grow all over the country.
I live near a reservation and I know for a fact the old Indians still stash rose hips. Wild roses live almost everywere.
Quick reply to this message
The Following 5 Users Say Thank You to S Roche For This Useful Post:
Old 03-20-2020, 06:19 PM
BillM BillM is offline
Hiker
 
Join Date: Oct 2011
Location: KY
Age: 71
Posts: 688
Thanks: 176
Thanked 1,309 Times in 451 Posts
Default They ate

They ate Pilgrims !
Quick reply to this message
The Following 2 Users Say Thank You to BillM For This Useful Post:
Old 03-20-2020, 06:38 PM
GrizzlyetteAdams's Avatar
GrizzlyetteAdams GrizzlyetteAdams is offline
Crap Creek Survivor
 
Join Date: Jan 2018
Posts: 1,703
Thanks: 3,603
Thanked 5,867 Times in 1,349 Posts
Default

Pine needle tea is outrageously delicious. Properly prepared, it tastes a lot like roses smell...

Chop up fresh green pine needles and soak in room temperature water over night or a day. Strain before drinking.

You can also make a warm infusion (it will still contain a lot of other goodies from the needles). Just don't actually boil the tea. Boil a cup of plain water, remove from the heat, wait a few minutes before dropping a tablespoon or two of chopped green needles. Cover and let sit for 10 minutes then enjoy!


Chickweed is another vitamin rich wild edible that often sprouts in late winter.

Most wild edibles are richer in vitamins and minerals than most things you buy from the grocery store.

Fresh wood violet leaves are high in Vitamin C (and A!) and grow in early spring, (and late, late winter in some places). Eat raw. I love this with chopped pineapple.
__________________
.


Tweeting my published articles & news of upcoming books about self-reliance, survival gardening, primitive living, disaster preps & making hard times (almost) painless: https://twitter.com/GrizzlyeteAdams
Quick reply to this message
The Following 10 Users Say Thank You to GrizzlyetteAdams For This Useful Post:
Old 03-20-2020, 07:03 PM
lasers lasers is offline
Survivor
 
Join Date: May 2017
Posts: 2,450
Thanks: 26
Thanked 3,167 Times in 1,484 Posts
Default

Cranberries stay on the plants well into late winter and can be found and picked by digging under the snow for them.
Quick reply to this message
The Following User Says Thank You to lasers For This Useful Post:
Old 03-20-2020, 07:06 PM
Sal4liberty Sal4liberty is offline
Survivor
 
Join Date: Mar 2010
Posts: 8,684
Thanks: 6,342
Thanked 20,300 Times in 6,218 Posts
Default

You can get all the vitamin c you need from eating animals. High carb diets require high doses of vitamin C because carbohydrates and vitamin c compete for receptors. Low carb diets require less.
Quick reply to this message
The Following User Says Thank You to Sal4liberty For This Useful Post:
Old 03-20-2020, 07:22 PM
MikeK's Avatar
MikeK MikeK is offline
Walking methane refinery
 
Join Date: Jul 2009
Location: Texas
Age: 57
Posts: 64,264
Thanks: 130,541
Thanked 153,997 Times in 44,788 Posts
Awards Showcase
Outstanding Member 
Total Awards: 1
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by GrizzlyetteAdams View Post
Pine needle tea is outrageously delicious. Properly prepared, it tastes a lot like roses smell...

Chop up fresh green pine needles and soak in room temperature water over night or a day. Strain before drinking.

You can also make a warm infusion (it will still contain a lot of other goodies from the needles). Just don't actually boil the tea. Boil a cup of plain water, remove from the heat, wait a few minutes before dropping a tablespoon or two of chopped green needles. Cover and let sit for 10 minutes then enjoy!


Chickweed is another vitamin rich wild edible that often sprouts in late winter.

Most wild edibles are richer in vitamins and minerals than most things you buy from the grocery store.

Fresh wood violet leaves are high in Vitamin C (and A!) and grow in early spring, (and late, late winter in some places). Eat raw. I love this with chopped pineapple.
Thanks for info on how to make it. Years back I tried to make blue spruce tea. It was like drinking pine-sol!
Quick reply to this message
The Following 6 Users Say Thank You to MikeK For This Useful Post:
Old 03-20-2020, 07:38 PM
hatchet jack's Avatar
hatchet jack hatchet jack is offline
Trapper
 
Join Date: Jun 2010
Location: South of Ft Worth
Posts: 799
Thanks: 1,097
Thanked 1,267 Times in 532 Posts
Default

I think you have to use white pine and the needles that grow in bunches of 5 to each cluster. If you watch the Jamestown documentary on YT they think vit C deficency was what caused a lot of the deaths. Of course back then I don't believe they knew what vitamins even were but knew the effects of the lack of them on the body. Thats where the British sailors got the name Limeys because the limes they carried prevented scurvy when ate.

I had to look up what rose hips were. I am not sure I have ever seen those in the wild. But if I do at least I will know what they look like now.
Quick reply to this message
The Following 2 Users Say Thank You to hatchet jack For This Useful Post:
Old 03-20-2020, 08:09 PM
~Black.Dog~ ~Black.Dog~ is offline
Survivor
 
Join Date: Jun 2014
Posts: 2,478
Thanks: 2,154
Thanked 6,609 Times in 1,918 Posts
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Aerindel View Post
Sheesh people....I guess none of you live on the Rez. Everyone here knows about natural vitamin C.

Rose Hips. A vitamin C superfood that stays edible on the bush all year long. I was chewing on some just the other day along the ditch road. They where a staple food of the natives.

One cup has 900% your daily value.

Just a few berries a day eaten or made into tea and your good, and they stay on the bush all winter with no other preservation needed.

So plentiful up here in Montana I don't grow any or stock vitamin C as year round I can get all I want out my front door, and I'm pretty sure these grow all over the country.
Rose hips were my first thought, too. But then I got thinking and realized that I don't know what distribution is like for wild rose.
Here in the mid Atlantic area I know that what we've always called wild rose is actually the Multiflora Rose. Its invasive and clogs slot of woodland areas here. In some places it's so thick that it's impossible to walk through without a machete.
This variety was introduced by our illustrious Dept of Agriculture, who promoted it to farmers as living fence and to prevent erosion.
I don't know if this stuff pushed out the original wild rose or how widespread it is across the country.
It produces tons of chips, though. I've been eating them since I was a kid.

Sent from my SM-G960U using Tapatalk
Quick reply to this message
The Following 2 Users Say Thank You to ~Black.Dog~ For This Useful Post:
Old 03-20-2020, 09:20 PM
GrizzlyetteAdams's Avatar
GrizzlyetteAdams GrizzlyetteAdams is offline
Crap Creek Survivor
 
Join Date: Jan 2018
Posts: 1,703
Thanks: 3,603
Thanked 5,867 Times in 1,349 Posts
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by hatchet jack View Post
I think you have to use white pine and the needles that grow in bunches of 5 to each cluster. If you watch the Jamestown documentary on YT they think vit C deficency was what caused a lot of the deaths. Of course back then I don't believe they knew what vitamins even were but knew the effects of the lack of them on the body. Thats where the British sailors got the name Limeys because the limes they carried prevented scurvy when ate.

I had to look up what rose hips were. I am not sure I have ever seen those in the wild. But if I do at least I will know what they look like now.

Fortunately, white pine is not the only species you can enjoy! I have tried many species over the years and never met one I didn't like.
__________________
.


Tweeting my published articles & news of upcoming books about self-reliance, survival gardening, primitive living, disaster preps & making hard times (almost) painless: https://twitter.com/GrizzlyeteAdams
Quick reply to this message
The Following 7 Users Say Thank You to GrizzlyetteAdams For This Useful Post:
Reply

Bookmarks

Tags
indians, vit c



Quick Reply
Message:
Options

Register Now

In order to be able to post messages on the Survivalist Forum forums, you must first register.
Please enter your desired user name, your email address and other required details in the form below.
User Name:
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.
Password:
Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.
Email Address:
Gender
Insurance
Please select your insurance company (Optional)

Log-in

Human Verification

In order to verify that you are a human and not a spam bot, please enter the answer into the following box below based on the instructions contained in the graphic.



Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 12:38 PM.


Powered by vBulletin®
Copyright ©2000 - 2020, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Search Engine Optimisation provided by DragonByte SEO (Lite) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2020 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.
vBulletin Security provided by vBSecurity v2.2.2 (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2020 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.
Copyright © Kevin Felts 2006 - 2015,
Green theme by http://www.themesbydesign.net