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Old 03-29-2020, 04:40 PM
goat daddy goat daddy is offline
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Lets make this simple. Stay home. I don't care if you have a summer home here. Keep you liberal attitude and you urban germs in you urban home. You have done enough to destroy our state. You don't have the right to do more. We don't want you, get the hint?
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Old 03-29-2020, 05:01 PM
OldSoul OldSoul is offline
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We have, at this moment, a scant handful of cases in our largely rural otherwise small town area, all imported by people leaving the cities and coming here to bug out.

The locals are already complaining on social media about the city folks coming here, stripping the few grocery stores we have bare, and bringing the virus with them.

The grocery stores are stripped of many items and are thin/stressed on many, many more. We are still being restocked but not to normal levels. I have no way of knowing whether its because of a sudden surge of out of towners, if those out of towners and second home people are stocking BOLs deep, or if it's locals/ full timers stocking deep, or both, or supply chain issues, or all of the above. I do know from online comments and local chatter that the locals are looking straight at the out of towners about that, and none too fondly.

I personally know transplants to this area from big cities who are much too smart and sophisticated and/or educated to "panic" about this virus. I honestly don't know how they are conducting their lives and activities but they are making it a point to tell anyone who stands still long enough that this is all one big Nothing Burger, that the entire country is overreacting, and it will all be over in a few weeks (except for the unnecessary financial destruction we've caused by overreacting. That, apparently, is FOREVAR, because of the stupid overreaction of the Chicken Littles that refuse to listen to reason.) These peeps are absolutely convinced they are right and are tone deaf to their own voices. They appear to be minding the state mandates about social distancing but they've told me point blank that they aren't changing their lives in any way beyond that. I don't think they have a grasp of how their largely vocalized position is going to age as cases out here rise, and they will rise, because of our inherent relationship with hot zones. This is a robust second home community, largely fed by densely populated metropolitan areas that are already hot zones.

On top of this pile of dry tinder, I've run across people who own investment/rental properties out here who are actively marketing their properties as BOLs and/or "quarantine" retreats. I'm not even kidding.

I am more than a little concerned about the flash point where all of these interpretations of reality collide.

If you are even thinking about bugging out to a rural location, for the vast majority of you, I'm betting you are looking at places that are very similar to where I live: to you it's "rural" primarily because it has a much lower population density. I'm betting that it has some to significant infrastructure and amenities or you wouldn't even consider it as viable. There are second houses available, perhaps yours, and grocery stores, and gasoline, and power, utilities etc. I'm sure some of you are quite remote and off grid but I'm sure that's the exception, statistically, not the rule. And if there is infrastructure and amenities and utilities, there are people there already.

Be advised that the situation is already complicated and in some areas, already tense.

If you have a stockpile of food and supplies and it's possible to transport it to your BOL, please consider doing so. It will take that much strain off of the local supplies and you won't get the side eye in the small town grocery store. Rent a small trailer if necessary, seriously. I'm sure a dozen people will find a problem with that idea, perhaps legitimately, but it's a thought. Don't assume that our rural stores are pristine and full of stock because there's nobody out here. That is no longer the case. The store shelves are thin and apparently there are more people out here now than even we realized.

Which brings me to another point, and I think this is true: I suspect that we will see cases rise here in part because city folks are engaging in magical thinking. They think that the risk is less here so they are letting their guard down. People have commented that our small towns seem crowded and busier than usual, even though businesses are complying with social distancing mandates. There's still a lot of traffic and a lot of people moving about, in fact, really, more than usual. Cars lined up bumper to bumper to pick up take out, for instance. Good for our locally owned restaurants, but it's not like these city folks are bugging out to remote locations, settling in, cooking their own food and watching t.v. They are doing what city people do: going into town for take out and shopping at whatever shops are allowed to be open. I suspect that, because these are small towns, the difference in scale and density seems safe to them compared to where they are from. For us, I've had more than one moment of thinking, "Why are there so many people here all of the sudden?"

If you are planning to bring an RV or camper, know that campgrounds both public and private are likely closed due to social distancing and non-essential business mandates, and that many localities and counties have zoning ordinances against or severely limiting living in RVs and campers full time, even on private land. Ours does.

In short, bugging out to a rural location may actually be more complicated and less of a good solution than simply bugging in where you already are located.
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Old 03-31-2020, 05:37 PM
Steve_In_29 Steve_In_29 is offline
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Is that like an opposite to hillbilly?

I just have never heard that one before...
A friend of mine lives in Big Bear, CA and that's how they refer to all the tourists that come up into the mountains to vacation (skiing, camping, off-roading, whatever).
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Old 04-01-2020, 01:27 AM
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Originally Posted by OldSoul View Post
We have, at this moment, a scant handful of cases in our largely rural otherwise small town area, all imported by people leaving the cities and coming here to bug out.

The locals are already complaining on social media about the city folks coming here, stripping the few grocery stores we have bare, and bringing the virus with them.

The grocery stores are stripped of many items and are thin/stressed on many, many more. We are still being restocked but not to normal levels. I have no way of knowing whether its because of a sudden surge of out of towners, if those out of towners and second home people are stocking BOLs deep, or if it's locals/ full timers stocking deep, or both, or supply chain issues, or all of the above. I do know from online comments and local chatter that the locals are looking straight at the out of towners about that, and none too fondly.

I personally know transplants to this area from big cities who are much too smart and sophisticated and/or educated to "panic" about this virus. I honestly don't know how they are conducting their lives and activities but they are making it a point to tell anyone who stands still long enough that this is all one big Nothing Burger, that the entire country is overreacting, and it will all be over in a few weeks (except for the unnecessary financial destruction we've caused by overreacting. That, apparently, is FOREVAR, because of the stupid overreaction of the Chicken Littles that refuse to listen to reason.) These peeps are absolutely convinced they are right and are tone deaf to their own voices. They appear to be minding the state mandates about social distancing but they've told me point blank that they aren't changing their lives in any way beyond that. I don't think they have a grasp of how their largely vocalized position is going to age as cases out here rise, and they will rise, because of our inherent relationship with hot zones. This is a robust second home community, largely fed by densely populated metropolitan areas that are already hot zones.

On top of this pile of dry tinder, I've run across people who own investment/rental properties out here who are actively marketing their properties as BOLs and/or "quarantine" retreats. I'm not even kidding.

I am more than a little concerned about the flash point where all of these interpretations of reality collide.

If you are even thinking about bugging out to a rural location, for the vast majority of you, I'm betting you are looking at places that are very similar to where I live: to you it's "rural" primarily because it has a much lower population density. I'm betting that it has some to significant infrastructure and amenities or you wouldn't even consider it as viable. There are second houses available, perhaps yours, and grocery stores, and gasoline, and power, utilities etc. I'm sure some of you are quite remote and off grid but I'm sure that's the exception, statistically, not the rule. And if there is infrastructure and amenities and utilities, there are people there already.

Be advised that the situation is already complicated and in some areas, already tense.

If you have a stockpile of food and supplies and it's possible to transport it to your BOL, please consider doing so. It will take that much strain off of the local supplies and you won't get the side eye in the small town grocery store. Rent a small trailer if necessary, seriously. I'm sure a dozen people will find a problem with that idea, perhaps legitimately, but it's a thought. Don't assume that our rural stores are pristine and full of stock because there's nobody out here. That is no longer the case. The store shelves are thin and apparently there are more people out here now than even we realized.

Which brings me to another point, and I think this is true: I suspect that we will see cases rise here in part because city folks are engaging in magical thinking. They think that the risk is less here so they are letting their guard down. People have commented that our small towns seem crowded and busier than usual, even though businesses are complying with social distancing mandates. There's still a lot of traffic and a lot of people moving about, in fact, really, more than usual. Cars lined up bumper to bumper to pick up take out, for instance. Good for our locally owned restaurants, but it's not like these city folks are bugging out to remote locations, settling in, cooking their own food and watching t.v. They are doing what city people do: going into town for take out and shopping at whatever shops are allowed to be open. I suspect that, because these are small towns, the difference in scale and density seems safe to them compared to where they are from. For us, I've had more than one moment of thinking, "Why are there so many people here all of the sudden?"

If you are planning to bring an RV or camper, know that campgrounds both public and private are likely closed due to social distancing and non-essential business mandates, and that many localities and counties have zoning ordinances against or severely limiting living in RVs and campers full time, even on private land. Ours does.

In short, bugging out to a rural location may actually be more complicated and less of a good solution than simply bugging in where you already are located.

^^THIS is exactly what I’m hearing from folks in the neighborhood watch page where our cabin is at. I don’t agree with it, but it’s turning small (and big) Sierra towns into smoldering, tense tinderboxes.

I would imagine that this should make people think twice about the stereotypical idea of bugging out (as opposed to actually relocating to a rural area) in most situations, not just a pandemic.

Unless your place is so “out there” that the neighbors literally don’t know if you’re there or not, during a big emergency, they will not want you there. Even if it’s your property and you pay your share of property taxes, the “locals” will view you as an outsider and as a strain on their resources.

And FWIW, bugging in is a better option anyways. Ugly, monotonous, but a better bet for sure.

We flatlanders produce, process, and deliver all the food that the fancy pants “locals” in the mountains get in their stores. It’s far too dry and cold and their soil sucks too much for big farming. We have a lot of truckers, so we bring them their gas, and just about everything else, too. And on top of that, we give them our money when we go up there on vacation.

Bunch of ingrates.
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Old 04-01-2020, 05:13 AM
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In short, bugging out to a rural location may actually be more complicated and less of a good solution than simply bugging in where you already are located.
Yup, panic makes people do stupid things. Common sense, shelter in place, simply NOT opening the door and talking with people will achieve the same social distancing needed. If you have to go out, chances of you catching the virus if you take the precautions of using a respirator, gloves and wash everything once you are back home, almost guarantees you wont get sick. You would have to do this any time you go out anyway, no matter where you live.
You dont have to pack the RV and move to Alaska.
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Old 04-01-2020, 05:16 AM
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Originally Posted by goat daddy View Post
Lets make this simple. Stay home. I don't care if you have a summer home here. Keep you liberal attitude and you urban germs in you urban home. You have done enough to destroy our state. You don't have the right to do more. We don't want you, get the hint?
Like the Spanish flu, right? The one that didnt originate in Spain at all but in a farm in rural USA...
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Old 04-01-2020, 05:54 AM
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Like the Spanish flu, right? The one that didnt originate in Spain at all but in a farm in rural USA...
You are welcome FerFAL
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Old 04-01-2020, 06:16 AM
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We flatlanders produce, process, and deliver all the food that the fancy pants “locals” in the mountains get in their stores. It’s far too dry and cold and their soil sucks too much for big farming. We have a lot of truckers, so we bring them their gas, and just about everything else, too. And on top of that, we give them our money when we go up there on vacation.

Bunch of ingrates.
Pardon me, but my rural, hilly county produces a lot of grassfed beef for you effete flatlanders. We also have a few dairies.
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Old 04-01-2020, 08:39 AM
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Same here with the Ozark Hillbillies
Lot of grass and beef
And milk
And water
And trees
And freedom from city-scum
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Old 04-01-2020, 08:44 PM
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Yep lots of beef raised out here and natural gas to heat your homes or run electric plants to keep your lights on.

People down in the Valley (Phoenix metro area) don't produce much of anything we need, they simply trans-ship things made elsewhere.

Where I'm at there are VERY few tourists and we don't look to them for income.
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Old 04-01-2020, 09:55 PM
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Yep lots of beef raised out here and natural gas to heat your homes or run electric plants to keep your lights on.

People down in the Valley (Phoenix metro area) don't produce much of anything we need, they simply trans-ship things made elsewhere.

Where I'm at there are VERY few tourists and we don't look to them for income.
Should have mentioned that for my area, too. While the gas and pipeline companies aren't much loved here, (cheating landowners is a way of life for them), the gas being produced on the Marcellus Shale is sent to cities to heat their homes and cook, or to power plants to keep their lights on, or to chemical plants making the raw materials for everything from plastic dinnerware to pharmaceuticals. For the flatlanders.

Double dittos about the tourists. At most we're a pit stop in the Interstate on the way to somewhere else. Which suits us. They leave money and keep going.
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Old 04-01-2020, 10:18 PM
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Pardon me, but my rural, hilly county produces a lot of grassfed beef for you effete flatlanders. We also have a few dairies.
Well good for you!

In the Sierra foothills there’s some cattle, but in the mountains, it’s almost all tourism.

The town where our cabin is who are complaining about flatlanders eating all their food literally produce no food.

Love it or hate it, no man is an island.
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Old 04-01-2020, 10:34 PM
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Thinking about it - Ketchum Idaho, the location of the Sun Valley resort and a square mile or more of multi-million-$$$ vacation villas, fits that description to a T. No other economic reason to exist.

And ironically it is the first and biggest hot-spot in Idaho, even outstripping the city of Boise, (256 cases vs. 225 as of this writing). I would gloat, if it weren't that I have loved ones among the farms further down the valley who are being put at risk.
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Old 04-02-2020, 02:06 AM
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I will cross post this from another thread that was along the same lines:

Rural areas need to demand ID for service. If your not from the area, then no service. Local's have priority.

I will add: If the supply trucks stop running, then block the roads. There is no reason for routes to be open to major urban areas after the supply trucks stop. Push for it in your local papers and on-line forums. Make it happen. Businesses can reserve the right to refuse service... so use it.

We can't cater to sheeple refugees who are too stupid to not have left the city at least two weeks ago when the lock downs started. Not to mention they don't have provisions stored in a BOL already and think the supermarket is open just for them to restock...
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Old 04-02-2020, 08:08 AM
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https://www.buzzfeednews.com/article...=pocket-newtab

My household lives in the city, a fairly small city by American standards, but big enough that we have many, many cases of Covid-19 and ventilators are pretty full right now.
This past September I got this wee little tickle in my tummy to stock-the-heck-up, and even before that just felt that it was needed to buy each and every seed packet of veggies we enjoy eating.
We have, right now, gone a month without outside food. This, in a 21'x21' apartment, with no balcony, still with fresh things to eat, and doing okay (except for tea, which apparently we go through ten or so boxes a month - who knew?)

I wish we did have money to buy a spot out 'in the sticks' to live - but honestly, this is second best, in our monetary situation. We had a cash set back a couple of years ago that wiped out all our savings, so we've been building up savings again.
If you have next to no money, if you are previewing what can happen, you tend to invest it in the future, not shiny new toys. Where we live, there's snow, lightning, and tornado. So I built upon mostly shelter-in-place.

Most of my co-workers are all broke. They have no cans in their pantries, and have to fight against all the other people who have no cans in their pantries to get food into them. Some have said they're just throwing stuff into a trailer and taking off to the ol' fishing hole, or to their northern cottage.
When I told them that this would be less than wise, I was told that they good ol' boys and gals would be very accommodating.

If I were a good ol' gal, I don't think I would be as sanguine to receive out-of-towners with their crotchspawn coughing all over the place, especially if they came from a Known Place of Covid-19.
If I were a good ol' gal, I don't think that I'd be terribly welcoming of out-of-towners taking up all the fresh produce in the market, and walking around like they owned the place.

It doesn't matter which side of the political fence you're on, either. I've seen both conservatives and liberals in my town go for 'shelter in place because we have a stockpile of stuff' and also it's polar opposite.
People be People, and they all do what is right in their hearts.

I hope, really I do, that there are more communities like Old Crow, who graciously but firmly sent a Quebec couple 'back home'. https://nationalpost.com/pmn/news-pm...ved-says-chief

The Plague had many, many people just run, taking it with them, spreading it around. This Covid-19 virus is not alive; viruses are not able to 'spread' by themselves. They need vectors to introduce them to new victims.
With so many of their spreaders with mild or non-existent symptoms, even if you're in the city, it's so much better to just STAY HOME.
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Old 04-02-2020, 10:56 PM
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i agree with Oldsoul.
I live in the "rural area" Our supply chain just barely keeps up with the population that we have. If an avalanche or blizzard slows delivery for a day or two the shelves begin to go empty. The small hospital is not close, what few stores we have are closed, gas is expensive, and food is sparse.

Even though you are in a "urban" higher populated area, you have a better and larger infrastructure. More food stores to go to if something is gone from one, way better doctors and health care, big box places like Sam's or BJ's.

Staying at home takes care of the population exposure you may have.
You will get restocked before the rural areas.
Be safe.
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Old 04-02-2020, 11:09 PM
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You will get restocked before the rural areas.
Truth. ....................
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Old 04-02-2020, 11:32 PM
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Like the Spanish flu, right? The one that didnt originate in Spain at all but in a farm in rural USA...
The spanish flu did not originate in Kansas.
The first case in the US was found near a US Army base training soilders for WW1.
But the flu was already wide spread among the soldiers fighting in the trenches.
We only got it because we got pulled into a stupid Euopean war, and those fighting it were already sick.

Where did the Europeans get it?
WW1 was fought in Europe, Asia minor, and the ME, and men were being shipped all over.
No one knows. Blame it on the stupid guy that started the whole thing.
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Old 04-03-2020, 12:33 AM
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The spanish flu did not originate in Kansas.
The first case in the US was found near a US Army base training soilders for WW1.
Right. Army training facility in.......(wait for it)...........Haskell, Kansas. Fort Riley to be exact.

But the flu was already wide spread among the soldiers fighting in the trenches.
No.
We only got it because we got pulled into a stupid Euopean war, and those fighting it were already sick.

Where did the Europeans get it?
WW1 was fought in Europe, Asia minor, and the ME, and men were being shipped all over.
No one knows. Blame it on the stupid guy that started the whole thing.
https://www.cdc.gov/flu/pandemic-res...eline-1918.htm

April 1918 at Fort Riley. Doughboys took it to Europe. First big epidemic here was in September 1918, another Army training facility in Massachusetts, Fort Devens, and Navy base in Boston. Both very close to where I grew up.

There IS a tinfoil-hat theory metastasizing on the Innertubes that claims it originated in China, got carried to Vancouver, Canada and then across Canada via trooptrain to embark for Europe, but it can't explain how it got from there to Fort Riley before anyone noticed it.
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Old 04-03-2020, 02:08 AM
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I have heard nurses even in more rural towns upset about people migrating from their city homes to their country cabins where the nearest town has no dedicated covid 19 set up and only one ventilator for the entire surrounding population . Not only are they not staying home but possible vectors of transmission to these more remote communities that have more limited resources . If your nurses resent that move, I wonder if you are at all in line for that ventilator if you needed it over a local ?
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