Ultimate trail gun? - Survivalist Forum
Survivalist Forum

Advertise Here

Go Back   Survivalist Forum > > >
Articles Classifieds Donations Gallery Groups Links Store Survival Files


Notices

Advertise Here
Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Zero gun experience or knowledge. Where to start? SingleMomPrepper Firearms General Discussion 99 03-12-2018 02:55 PM
Gun confiscation in action... slackercruster Firearms General Discussion 46 12-14-2017 08:56 PM
Best Gun Safe for Getting Your Gun (in a panic) JOracle Firearms General Discussion 48 10-24-2017 02:33 AM
Need advice to buy an airsoft gun Lord Theus General Discussion 2 03-17-2017 12:56 AM

Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
Old 08-15-2017, 08:26 AM
Popeye Doyle's Avatar
Popeye Doyle Popeye Doyle is offline
Deplorable
 
Join Date: Feb 2015
Location: Land of the Free
Posts: 4,358
Thanks: 8,523
Thanked 13,843 Times in 3,506 Posts
Default Ultimate trail gun?



Advertise Here

Maybe ... if you can handle the recoil. The 500 is an impressive looking revolver, but damn, it's a handful.

https://gunsmagazine.com/big-bad-belly-gun/
Quick reply to this message
The Following 3 Users Say Thank You to Popeye Doyle For This Useful Post:
Old 08-15-2017, 11:03 AM
rustednail rustednail is offline
AimSmallMissSmall
 
Join Date: Jun 2017
Posts: 882
Thanks: 1,402
Thanked 1,676 Times in 537 Posts
Default

you know the NAA is preferred over that monster
Quick reply to this message
The Following User Says Thank You to rustednail For This Useful Post:
Old 08-15-2017, 11:21 AM
kraigwy kraigwy is offline
Target Shooter
 
Join Date: Sep 2015
Location: NE Wyoming
Posts: 435
Thanks: 46
Thanked 1,171 Times in 334 Posts
Default

I have lots of guns, big and little, I dont see me having the need to carry a heavy revolver when I on the trail. Hunting being he exception but I'll have a rifle then.

I haven't found the need to carry anything but my normal CC revolver, which is a Smith J Frame.

It will handle anything that needs handled where I go. If I use it, it will be to dispatch rattlers or pick up a rabbit 'n such for the pot. That little 38 will accomplish that task.

Another thing about heavy pistols/revolvers. When we set up camp we have a tendency to drop the pack and if a heavy hand gun, lay it on the pack or somewhere while we go about our chores.

Often, while gathering wood or what ever we spot a rabbit or other small game and find our heavy handgun is back at camp.

Not the case if my little revolver is in my pocket.

The trick is knowing how to shoot what you carry. Of course the little 5 shot revolver is a short range handgun, but you encounter small game at short distances. I'm not going to be taking 50 yard shots regardless of what handgun I have. But if I cant hit a rabbit at 15 yards with my little revolver, I"m going to pack up, go back to the house and practice tell I can.
Quick reply to this message
The Following 10 Users Say Thank You to kraigwy For This Useful Post:
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
Old 08-15-2017, 11:30 AM
Outpost75 Outpost75 is offline
Survivor
 
Join Date: Jul 2015
Location: Outside the Moderate Damage Radius, over the mountain and far away.
Posts: 2,256
Thanks: 1,883
Thanked 4,581 Times in 1,590 Posts
Default

"Almost the Best Small Pistol"

Who was J.V.K. Wagar?

If you Google Mr. Wagar you’ll find that he was a Colorado forester who was active in the Wildlife Society of Colorado A&M University and various professional organizations into the mid 1950s. He wrote an article which appeared in the August, 1931 issue of The American Rifleman on pgs. 14-15, entitled “Almost, the Best Small Pistol.”

If unfamiliar with the .32 ACP, I urge you to read the article. If you do, you may just find yourself buying a .32 pocket pistol years later, in fondly recalling the article. That’s exactly why I did.

Let’s be clear that the .32 ACP is never first choice as a defense gun against either two-legged or 4-legged predators. But there are times when “any gun is better than no gun.” Because I can carry legally in my home state of West Virginia, I do so most of the time.

It is also true that some social and recreational occasions require that I do so discreetly, lest I “scare the natives.” When or where the cylinder bulge of my usual D-frame Colt Police Positive .38 Special is too obvious, a .32 automatic drops nicely into a pocket holster. I like the fact that it makes a bigger hole than a 22, and with hot loads it approaches .32-20 or .380 ACP energy, [90-grain Hornady XTP .309" bullet at 950 fps with 3 grains of AutoComp] and it presents a low profile.

A .32 automatic is small, light, flat and compact. It is convenient, accessible and practical to carry during my woods-loafing hikes or overnights, which may present an opportunity to shoot small game for camp meat or plink a magazine or two at cans by firelight. You could just as easily do this with a .38 Special, but the .32 ACP’s appeal for me is that used guns for it these days are plentiful and cheap, and it uses the same components I have already for the .32 S&W Long and .32-20, my preferred trail revolvers.

Hand loads bring the .32 ACP to its full potential. US factory loads are anemic compared to their CIP-Eurocounterparts. Typical American FMJs feature a 71-grain bullet at an advertised “catalog velocity” of 905 f.p.s. But in my chronograph tests they actually produce velocities closer to 850 f.p.s. in the average pocket pistol. European RWS, Geco, Fiocchi or Sellier & Belloit ammo clock 950-1000 f.p.s. from the 3-3/4" Colt, with a heavier 73-grain bullet!

In over 40 years experience, I have found that the best small game load for a .32 ACP is assembled with a flat-nosed cast bullet, heavier than issue FMJ, to produce a heavier recoil impulse. The resulting load approximates the ballistics of the .32 S&W Long or .32 Colt New Police when fired from a 4-inch revolver. We are talking about an 85 to 98 grain flat-nosed cowboy bullet such as the RCBS 32-098SWC or Saeco #325 or #326 semi-wadcutters launched at about 800 f.p.s. with 2.4 grains of Unique or 2.5 grains of AutoComp. In sturdy, steel frame pistols you can replace the stock springs with a .380 ACP sprng kit and bump up the loads to match .380 ACP or .32-20 payload and velocity. About this more later...

How I arrived at this conclusion takes us to directly to Wagar’s article…

When fresh out of the Navy my boss asked me to assemble some heavy bullet loads for an M1903 Colt Pocket Model .32 ACP. My first thought was, “why the ^&*^%#[email protected] would anybody want to do THAT? The recipient, Harry J. Archer then worked for our government and was being sent out of the country clandestinely on our behalf. He needed ammunition which reliably functioned his M-series Colt, and which would be more effective than hardball, the only ammo then available.

When I asked why Harry was packing a .32 and not something more effective, I was informed politely that it was really none of my business, but that “when in Rome, you do as the Roman’s do.” 'K' explained to me that if Harry took a .45 or a .357 it would be obvious that he was “not a local.” Since “bad guys” where he was going normally used .32 automatics, while military and police carried various 9mms, the Colt would be discreet and also “blend in.” While an FN or Beretta would have been better, we didn’t have one. Walthers, according to Harry, were notorious “hand biters,” and not an option, so ending the conversation.

Loading manuals were of little help, so I researched and stumbled upon Wagar’s article. It was an entertaining treasure trove of practical information on the Colt pocket model and loading cast bullets for the .32 ACP. Wagar said that, “it has proved so useful for much of the outdoor shooting in our part of the country that … I frequently leave my heavier pistols and revolvers at home…

“This is not a deep wilderness side arm…, but as a light pistol to accompany the big rifle it has many advantages… one is never hampered by its weight and bulk and it need not be left behind because the way is hard and steep or the trail long…“The .32 Colt Automatic… is the biggest pistol that fits comfortably into ones pockets… and its owner isn’t often asked by some romance filled tourist if you are a real live cowboy, so the hills are full of these pistols.”

“Practical accuracy is not of the spectacular kind… I can obtain quite good accuracy holding the pistol in both hands and resting them upon my knees I can hit a 50-cent piece practically with every shot at 20 yards. … is almost ideal for strictly small game shooting, we have shot many cottontails, grouse, squirrels… over 200 pieces of game in all--- and have found it unexcelled. It is just enough larger than a .22 Long Rifle to make it a more certain killer, yet destroys little more flesh and makes little more noise in the woods…cast bullets will give more killing power than the jacketed factory bullets. They do not expand upon flesh, but roughen when they strike bone and tear flesh rather than parting it.”

“If one has access to an Ideal No. 4 tool and mould for the .32 S&W he is well equipped… The .32 S&W bullet weighs 88 grains and its diameter of .313 inch is well adapted... I have loaded many hundreds of .32 A.C. cartridges with .32 S&W tools…If one shoots a high-powered .30 caliber rifle Marbles adapters using the .32 A.C. cartridge can be used for small game shooting or one can use the .32 A.C. cartridge in the Winchester adapters made for firing .32 S&W cartridges in the .30-30, .30-40 and .30-‘06 rifles.

In closing, Wagar summarized: "This is not a target arm, nor is it powerful enough for defense purposes against great beasts or armed men of great virility; but considering its short length, light weight, light report and recoil, and cheapness of ammunition, one will have difficulty in finding a more accurate, more reliable and more powerful pistol just to take along.”

The .32 pocket guns don't have any great reputation for accuracy. The Speer No. 13 handbook states that 3-4" at 25 yards is about the best you can hope for. This agrees with my testing experience and is also in keeping with WWII German military and postwar German police acceptance accuracy standards which allowed 5 mils or 75mm of dispersion (about 3") at 15 meters (approximately 49 ft.).

Any pocket pistol which groups better than 4 mils, or 60mm (2.36") at 15 meters is said by Europeans to be quite good. My experience with a dozen or so .32 ACP pocket guns over the years confirms that the most accurate pocket pistols are the Walther PP (not the PPK), FN M1922, Mauser HSc, Beretta M935, M70, M81, Colt Pocket and CZ27.

The best .32 pocket guns reliably shoot into about 2” at 50 feet. Any pocket pistol which does should be considered a “keeper.” During my 1972 introduction to the Colt Pocket Hammerless, I became impressed with its instinctive pointing, reliable function and practical accuracy “for what it was.”

Reading Col. Rex Applegate's close combat files and practicing WWII techniques I understood why people who have these don't get rid of them. During that era I tested just about every .32 ACP pistol made, to isolate which guns were the most reliable, accurate, and natural pointers. We fired lab specimens borrowed from 11th MI., US Army FSTC, FBI and BATF labs as well as some more unusual guns borrowed from private collections.

No hollow-point factory loads existed then, so we shot “hot” European WW2-era hardball and handloads assembled with cast bullets and Winchester factory lead, 100-grain flat-nosed .32-20 slugs. These, loaded to 0.97" OAL with 2.4 grs. of Unique became Harry’s choice for hand-loaded carry ammo in his overseas go-bag.

Use of M-series Colt Pocket Hammerless pistols during WWII by our OSS and Britain’s SOE is well documented. Colt Pocket Models were issued to U.S. general officers well into the 1970s. A Type III Colt was Harry’s choice for discreet carry when a larger, more adequate firearm was not "mission feasible."

The various Berettas M1934/35, M70, the VZ/CZ27, Mauser M1910 and HSc, the Browning M1910 and M1922 also "made the cut" in terms of reliability, but in Harry’s eyes were only substitutes, being “acceptable, but not first choice,” compared to the Colt. I have since collected and tested all of the .32 autos on what the insiders down “at the farm” used to call “Harry's Good List.” I've shot them all fairly extensively and the results are interesting.

I fired eight-shot groups, because that’s what their magazines hold. While these are short-range guns I shot them at 25 yards to allow comparison with typical service guns, although that represents extreme range for a pocket pistol. For field utility in shooting small game for camp meat, ten to fifteen yards is the practical limit for any reasonable expectation of "small game accuracy," which I see as a two-inch group. Six-shot groups fired from typical 3" pocket revolvers are no different.

This level of accuracy is practical and realistic. Dispatching trapped animals and sitting short range rabbits, sure! But no head-shots at squirrels in tall trees. These little guns are for close woods range.

Flat-nosed cast bullets are more effective than LRN or FMJ hardball, offering deep penetration with good "crush" characteristics. They are cheaper than jacketed hollow-points, feed more reliably and tend to be more accurate! My best gun and load combinations group around 3 inches at 25 yards.

My favorite cast bullet handloads use the Accurate 31-087T rounded-flatnose cast of wheelweights, lubricated with Lee Liquid Alox, sized .311 and loaded with 3 grains of Olin AutoComp or 5.6 grains of Alliant #2400 for 900 fps from a 3-3/4" barrel.

My Colt is no louder than a .22 rimfire and is more effective on edible game and varmints. Who could ask for anything more?
Quick reply to this message
The Following 13 Users Say Thank You to Outpost75 For This Useful Post:
Old 08-15-2017, 11:31 AM
Tucanchew's Avatar
Tucanchew Tucanchew is offline
Mr. Green Thumb
 
Join Date: Oct 2011
Location: Western U.S.
Posts: 877
Thanks: 2,521
Thanked 1,780 Times in 577 Posts
Default

I carry a snub .38 when hiking. The most danger in the woods around these parts are people not wildlife.
Quick reply to this message
The Following 6 Users Say Thank You to Tucanchew For This Useful Post:
Old 08-15-2017, 12:10 PM
Popeye Doyle's Avatar
Popeye Doyle Popeye Doyle is offline
Deplorable
 
Join Date: Feb 2015
Location: Land of the Free
Posts: 4,358
Thanks: 8,523
Thanked 13,843 Times in 3,506 Posts
Default

If I was in an area that merited carrying the 500, I'd have a 12 gauge pump or 45-70 brush gun instead.
Quick reply to this message
The Following 19 Users Say Thank You to Popeye Doyle For This Useful Post:
Old 08-15-2017, 01:23 PM
Outpost75 Outpost75 is offline
Survivor
 
Join Date: Jul 2015
Location: Outside the Moderate Damage Radius, over the mountain and far away.
Posts: 2,256
Thanks: 1,883
Thanked 4,581 Times in 1,590 Posts
Default

Going back to my research of more than 40 years ago, I then found it VERY interesting that the Colt 1851 Navy cap & ball revolver, the .32-20 Winchester fired from a revolver and modern handloads in the .32 S&W Long and .32 ACP ALL provide essentially the same weight of payload, kinetic energy and velocity. Here we are talking about an 85-100 grain bullet at 900-1000 fps.

In its day the .36 Navy Colt was deemed an effective small game gun and adequate manstopper for the fellow who kept a cool head and placed his shots well. The same can be said for all of the .32s mentioned above, and the .32 H&R Magnum, also.

Because people will ask, my brief thoughts on the .327 Federal. Ballistically it compares more to the 7.62x25 Tokarev or the .30 Carbine fired in the Ruger revolver than the .32-20. I have no personal experience with the .327, but based on having used the 7.62x25 TOK briefly and the .30 Carbine Ruger fairly extensively, IMHO a higher intensity .30 cal. handgun cartridge is not as well suited to a small, compact "trail" gun. It doesn't lend itself to optimum ballistic performance in barrels shorter than 6 inches. Used with JHP bullets it would not give adequate penetration for defense,. With factory loads it would be VERY destructive of edible game. Sure, you could also shoot .32 H&R Mag. or .32 S&W Long ammo in it, but most of guns chambered for it weigh more than a kilogram, and don't fit my definition of a "trail" gun you would walk around with.

When it comes down to how long you can last with the maximum number of rounds you can carry for a given weight and cube, the .32 ACP effectively splits the difference between a .22 LR and a .38 Special. A good balance of power in a light weight, compact package.

With a flat-nosed bullet at max. velocity the .32 ACP penetrates VERY well, more than 20 inches of 10% gelatin and it does about as much damage as the old 158-grain LRN .38 Special load, which was deemed adequate for police use for many years. http://mousegunaddict.blogspot.com/2...rain-hcfn.html

The purpose of a survival handgun is to neutralize immediate threats from contact range to 30 feet, to facilitate escape, or to dispatch small game at short range for the pot. This is not a "gunfighters gun." Because, in the words of Harry Archer, "If you stand and fight you'll never live to shoot them all."

The rapidity with which a .32 enables accurate, multiple hits, combined with low noise,muzzle flash and recoil, discreet profile and minimum weight and cube of "the package" mostly compensate for its lower kinetic energy.

During WWII the Colt Pocket Hammerless was deemed the greatest natural pointer when used in the “Applegate method.” The user's attention is "target focused," upon the threat, watching the bad guy's hands, evaluating whether he is friend or foe, being ready to either instantly disappear without notice, or to “shoot and scoot,” always with emphasis on speed. We aren't talking "one-shot-stops" here, but precise double or triple tap head-shots in two seconds or less. The gun is gripped convulsively and pointed "as naturally as if it was an extension of your finger."

Best read on the subject is "Bullseyes Don't Shoot Back!" by Col. Rex Applegate
Attached Thumbnails
Click image for larger version

Name:	ColtPocketHammerless1.jpg
Views:	101
Size:	49.0 KB
ID:	222193   Click image for larger version

Name:	ColtM1903AfterSightCorrect.jpg
Views:	105
Size:	50.7 KB
ID:	222201   Click image for larger version

Name:	WW2German765mm.jpg
Views:	89
Size:	79.0 KB
ID:	222209   Click image for larger version

Name:	31-087T-D.jpg
Views:	80
Size:	28.3 KB
ID:	222217   Click image for larger version

Name:	32ACP_ExpTests 001.jpg
Views:	89
Size:	53.1 KB
ID:	222225  
Quick reply to this message
The Following 3 Users Say Thank You to Outpost75 For This Useful Post:
Old 08-15-2017, 01:33 PM
RedElk's Avatar
RedElk RedElk is offline
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2010
Location: Idaho, Alaska
Posts: 187
Thanks: 660
Thanked 257 Times in 127 Posts
Default

Seems more than a tad overkill.
I would opt for a nice S&W model 65 with a 4" barrel, or even a model 64 with same, shooting +P ammo. For small game shooting for the pot, some nice cast lead moderate load .38s work nicely.
There were several folks in AK who carried the S&W 500 for bear protection. It seemed a little too much of a good thing. Very heavy and expensive to shoot and practice with.
The nicest large revolver I shot was the Taurus Raging Bull Stainless 5" in .454 Casull, as I have stated before. It was not overly large, had a great deal of serious knockdown power, and was easy to control and hit with.
But, as has been said, a lever in .45-70 makes much more sense if in need of bear protection.

re
Attached Thumbnails
Click image for larger version

Name:	Taurus-454-Casull-Raging-Bull.jpg
Views:	69
Size:	33.6 KB
ID:	222185   Click image for larger version

Name:	S&W mdl 65.jpg
Views:	71
Size:	55.2 KB
ID:	222233  

Last edited by RedElk; 08-15-2017 at 01:39 PM.. Reason: adding pictures
Quick reply to this message
The Following 3 Users Say Thank You to RedElk For This Useful Post:
Old 08-15-2017, 01:43 PM
Walter Tyler's Avatar
Walter Tyler Walter Tyler is offline
On what date did kev sell
 
Join Date: Jul 2015
Location: Here
Posts: 5,911
Thanks: 15,621
Thanked 15,529 Times in 4,614 Posts
Default

And at only $2 every time you squeeze the trigger... Why Not.
Quick reply to this message
The Following User Says Thank You to Walter Tyler For This Useful Post:
Old 08-15-2017, 02:52 PM
ppine ppine is offline
I love this forum
 
Join Date: Oct 2013
Location: Northern Nevada
Posts: 10,726
Thanks: 8,298
Thanked 10,983 Times in 5,386 Posts
Default

In the alders up North it is comforting to have some power on your side. The 500 S&W is no fun to shoot, but the advantage of a pistol is that it is always on your person. Good for things like fishing or working when your hands are occupied and a rifle is in the way.

I have had the experience of feeling under gunned with a .44 mag in Alaska with the coastal brownies at close range. I went to rifles, but the big 500 looks really strong and will do the job.

Under normal conditions, a .357 mag with the right bullets is a great round to carry. I like the .44 mag even more, but not for Alaska. The 500 is for special conditions, not hunting hogs in Texas.
Quick reply to this message
Old 08-15-2017, 03:16 PM
rwtrapper's Avatar
rwtrapper rwtrapper is offline
Wind
 
Join Date: Oct 2016
Location: Upstate SC
Posts: 1,204
Thanks: 1,579
Thanked 1,740 Times in 771 Posts
Default

For me it would be what size critter I would see as the largest threat. That was wild dogs here where I live for the first 20 or so years of my life. Now wild hogs or a chance to pop a coyote would be the critters I'm going to run into. I had started out with a single six 22lr for my pasture patrols and fishing and hunting sidearm as a young teenager. I was given a colt .357 mag when I graduated high school and she was my sidearm for many years. Then a Ruger Red Hawk in 44mag which I traded off. It was too large for my taste for a pile of walking like I use to do. I carried several different 45 acp pistols. I have gone back to a SS Ruger GP100 in .357 mag. The .357 is just perfect to me. I do not like small hand guns. Small calibers do not bother me just small handguns. I do also still carry a 45 acp a lot during hunting season. I'm going to hunt with a handgun this season and the 45 & 357 are my choice rounds.

What you shoot accurately and like to carry is what you should carry. That being said make sure you are not under powered by considering what critters you may face on the trail.
Quick reply to this message
The Following 6 Users Say Thank You to rwtrapper For This Useful Post:
Old 08-15-2017, 04:59 PM
Jager78's Avatar
Jager78 Jager78 is offline
"This is my Boomstick!"
 
Join Date: Feb 2011
Location: Minnesota
Posts: 1,774
Thanks: 9
Thanked 1,334 Times in 732 Posts
Default

The most important thing is staying alert and being a good shot.
I believe it has more to do with the ammunition you are using than the actual gun itself.

Here in Minnesota while hiking, hunting, or camping in the North Woods I am fine carrying my Walther PPQ M2 9mm or even my Walther PPS M2 9mm just so long as I have them loaded with my favorite defensive ammunition. Lehigh Defense Xtreme Defense which penetrates like a FMJ and leaves a permanent wound cavity like a Hollowpoint.

Sure I would rather have a Pfeifer Zeliska .600 Nitro Express revolver if a Bull Moose or a 800+ lbs Black Bear was charging me, but I wouldn't like carrying that around all day.
Quick reply to this message
The Following User Says Thank You to Jager78 For This Useful Post:
Old 08-15-2017, 08:28 PM
Popeye Doyle's Avatar
Popeye Doyle Popeye Doyle is offline
Deplorable
 
Join Date: Feb 2015
Location: Land of the Free
Posts: 4,358
Thanks: 8,523
Thanked 13,843 Times in 3,506 Posts
Default

I think the S&W 460 is more practical than the 500 in that it can chamber different calibers. Still a big revolver to lug around though.
Quick reply to this message
The Following 3 Users Say Thank You to Popeye Doyle For This Useful Post:
Old 08-15-2017, 08:43 PM
justin22885 justin22885 is offline
Awesome
 
Join Date: Jul 2013
Posts: 14,328
Thanks: 0
Thanked 22,013 Times in 7,333 Posts
Default

if large predatory animals, or violent non predatory animals were a threat (i have been chased by bison before), i would carry an AK pistol before id carry a 5-shot revolver in any caliber
Quick reply to this message
Old 08-15-2017, 08:45 PM
justin22885 justin22885 is offline
Awesome
 
Join Date: Jul 2013
Posts: 14,328
Thanks: 0
Thanked 22,013 Times in 7,333 Posts
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Popeye Doyle View Post
I think the S&W 460 is more practical than the 500 in that it can chamber different calibers. Still a big revolver to lug around though.
agree on the 460... theres a rimless version of the 460 mag which is a .308 round, straight-walled and .451" bullets, if i could actually find magazines for something like that i thought about chambering it in an AK pistol or SBR just for fun, but that setup would make a pretty damn effective bear defense weapon too
Quick reply to this message
Old 08-15-2017, 09:17 PM
Cowboypapa Cowboypapa is offline
Hunter
 
Join Date: Apr 2016
Posts: 1,428
Thanks: 1,693
Thanked 2,924 Times in 1,036 Posts
Default

I like my .45lc ruger vaquero, 7.5" barrel. Ive seen 3 mountain lions in my life. Ive backtrailed a lot more than that though that were trailing me. Although the average california black bear isnt exceptionally large, the can still get ****y when jumped on the trail or with cubs. Ive tagged 3 with my vaquero. All 3 of those were an oh **** moment for me and them. My mustang on the other hand was ears back, pawing, and pushing through the hack. Hes an awesome work horse,but, he was a band stallion that didnt get cut till he was 6 so he tends to go full on barroom brawler first and think about things afterwards so the vaquero is nice to have around lol.
Quick reply to this message
The Following 9 Users Say Thank You to Cowboypapa For This Useful Post:
Old 08-15-2017, 09:47 PM
HappyinID's Avatar
HappyinID HappyinID is online now
VIP Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2011
Posts: 3,048
Thanks: 2,289
Thanked 3,813 Times in 1,788 Posts
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Popeye Doyle View Post
If I was in an area that merited carrying the 500, I'd have a 12 gauge pump or 45-70 brush gun instead.
Agreed. But if one needs a handgun, a 250 grain hard cast 44 or 45 at 950 fps, will blow through anything in the lower 48 at the least. And it's a lot easier to carry and actually hit things with.
Quick reply to this message
The Following 9 Users Say Thank You to HappyinID For This Useful Post:
Old 08-17-2017, 07:09 PM
pinetree64 pinetree64 is offline
Prepared
 
Join Date: Feb 2010
Location: North Georgia
Posts: 269
Thanks: 1,321
Thanked 131 Times in 92 Posts
Default

I miss the PPK I owned though it was a hand biter. In field, farm and forest I started with a 629 4", too big and heavy. Moved to a Taurus M66 4" 7 shot. Still too big and heavy when working in the heat and humidity of South GA. Bought an SP101 3", perfect. Snake shot and stout 357 for summer. All 357 winter camping in the mountains. 38 +p around town. It rides in Simply Rugged holster. Oh, and I really miss my Keltec P32. It was great for gym shorts.
Quick reply to this message
The Following User Says Thank You to pinetree64 For This Useful Post:
Old 08-18-2017, 11:16 AM
Metric Metric is offline
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2012
Posts: 191
Thanks: 26
Thanked 229 Times in 100 Posts
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Walter Tyler View Post
And at only $2 every time you squeeze the trigger... Why Not.
Right, I wouldn't consider a trail gun anywhere near ideal if it's basically never meant to be fired. In my ideal trail gun, I expect to shoot nearly a box of ammo for $2, and shooting the gun outdoors is something I look forward to, rather than a nightmare scenario that I hope will never occur.

The .500 may have a genuine place, but it's an extremely narrow place, rather than a broad one. It's closer to a gun "for the handgunner who has everything," than it is to the "ultimate trail gun."
Quick reply to this message
The Following 4 Users Say Thank You to Metric For This Useful Post:
Old 08-18-2017, 12:28 PM
Outpost75 Outpost75 is offline
Survivor
 
Join Date: Jul 2015
Location: Outside the Moderate Damage Radius, over the mountain and far away.
Posts: 2,256
Thanks: 1,883
Thanked 4,581 Times in 1,590 Posts
Default

An excellent period article on the .32-20 by Maurice H. Decker appeared in Fur-Fish-Game, vol 26, No 2, Aug 1917, pages 30-31.

It seems that 100 years ago nobody needed a "cannon" on their hip... I have used the .32-20, .32 ACP and .32 S&W Long as "trail" guns for over 50 years and have always felt them superior to a rimfire and never felt under gunned. Though I confess in the Appalachians there aren't any predators big enough to eat 'cha...

[While NOBODY today would recommend that anybody actually use the .32-20 as a “bear gun”, I thought you might like to read what the magazines of that era said about it].

“…the .32 Smith & Wesson revolver shell…will shoot very nicely in the .32-20 rifle and forms a very desirable load for dropping small game animals… and will kill small animals cleanly because of its round, pointed bullet…

…many farmers and stock men…use the .32-20 for butchering purposes, shooting hogs with shorts and cattle with the regular load. A better combination could hardly be chosen or secured with but one rifle, as nothing less powerful than the .32-20 will drop a heavy steer down to stay… while hogs require a light charge similar to the S. & W. for best results in bleeding.

“The factories recommend .32-20 for game as small as squirrel, but I have found the flat pointed bullet tears up rabbit and even geese pretty thoroughly…when…I want as much meat left for the kettle or fry-pan as possible.

“For woodchcuck shooting…the .32-20 is an ideal caliber…it is a sure killer at short and medium ranges and at …200..yards the High Velocity shells…shoot much more accurately than one would… suppose…

“Since the .32-20 cartridges have been put out with smokeless powder and lead bullets… I would earnestly recommend the smokeless loads for steady shooting. The metal patched bullet with the smokeless charge of regular power will also prove a valuable load for killing small game without excessive tearing when one happens to be out of the .32 S. & W. shorts.

“The .32-20 High Velocity…is really a deadly little killer…and…has been used with success many times upon deer and even bear and although… I would always recommend a heavier caliber, the hunter or trapper need have no fear or hesitation of taking a shot at either should it cross his path at a reasonable range…

“…For extreme light weight and general service the hunter and trapper should examine and handle, if possible, the half-magazine .32-20 carbine which for its weight and size will furnish as much actual business shooting as any…of this class. For use in a country where medium sized and large game may be frequently seen I would advise a carbine with a special smokeless steel barrel and the almost exclusive use of the H. V. loads…

"With this light…weapon the trapper could drop anything crossed his path, from a Canada jay to a black bear in a steel trap or even at large and in case of a deer crossing his trail at short range he would stand a very good chance of eating venison at his next meal...

“…I would not advise a shot at a deer with the .32-20 H. V. at over 70 yards unless the hunter is badly in need of meat, as…too many animals shot with low power guns…escape the hunter... of no benefit to anyone…except to furnish food for wolves...
Quick reply to this message
The Following 9 Users Say Thank You to Outpost75 For This Useful Post:
Reply

Bookmarks



Quick Reply
Message:
Options

Register Now

In order to be able to post messages on the Survivalist Forum forums, you must first register.
Please enter your desired user name, your email address and other required details in the form below.
User Name:
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.
Password:
Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.
Email Address:
Gender
Insurance
Please select your insurance company (Optional)

Log-in

Human Verification

In order to verify that you are a human and not a spam bot, please enter the answer into the following box below based on the instructions contained in the graphic.



Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 09:17 AM.


Powered by vBulletin®
Copyright ©2000 - 2019, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Search Engine Optimisation provided by DragonByte SEO (Lite) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2019 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.
vBulletin Security provided by vBSecurity v2.2.2 (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2019 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.
Copyright © Kevin Felts 2006 - 2015,
Green theme by http://www.themesbydesign.net