Is your gun safe safe? - Page 2 - Survivalist Forum
Survivalist Forum

Advertise Here

Go Back   Survivalist Forum > >
Articles Classifieds Donations Gallery Groups Links Store Survival Files


Notices

Firearms General Discussion Rifles, pistols, shotguns, scopes, grips and everything in between.

Advertise Here
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
Old 10-09-2019, 11:32 AM
ajole ajole is offline
Survivor
 
Join Date: Dec 2007
Posts: 9,527
Thanks: 7,482
Thanked 21,377 Times in 6,808 Posts
Default



Advertise Here

So far, my "safes" are totally safe.

No gun has yet escaped to cause fear and havoc.

I anticipate the same for the rest of my lifetime at least.
Quick reply to this message
The Following User Says Thank You to ajole For This Useful Post:
Old 10-09-2019, 11:49 AM
woodyp woodyp is offline
Survivor
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Location: East Texas
Posts: 3,215
Thanks: 932
Thanked 4,602 Times in 1,693 Posts
Default

A safe is even better when backed up buy a separate home gun insurance policy rider.
Quick reply to this message
Old 10-10-2019, 07:57 AM
barnetmill's Avatar
barnetmill barnetmill is offline
Survivor
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: Western part of FL Panhandle
Posts: 2,554
Thanks: 6,736
Thanked 2,281 Times in 1,287 Posts
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Cuteandfuzzybunnies View Post
Wall safes are “ok”. They are usually easy to pull out of the wall, but can be hard to find.

FLOOR SAFES properly installed in a concrete foundation can be real hard to find and real hard to break into when you do. Cutting attacks are difficult as access is limited and you have to attack the safe door. You are going to have to use a sledge to busy it out OR actually drill / manipulate the lock. Using the sledge is too much like work most crooks. And cracking the safe will take a long time and some knowledge. Unless you are pretty rich , it’s not likely worth most crooks time.

The downside is floor safes are expensive to install and too small for most gun collections. Also many of us don’t have slabs.
I do not have a slab.
I will not give too many details but it involves solid poured concrete-steel rebar walls with one place where is a hidden space behind the wall that is covered by two blocks that were left empty. You would need a large diameter saw capable of cutting concrete and steel to pull those walls out or know exactly where to get through and that there is something behind it. You first need to get inside of a similarly constructed vault and know that there is a sublevel space behind it. This will be mainly for red flag seizures and Burglars.

I am retired and I do not go out that much and normally only for a few hours. The only indication that I am gone are the dogs patiently waiting at the gate for my return.
Quick reply to this message
Old 10-10-2019, 10:36 AM
recklessdriver recklessdriver is offline
Prepper elite
 
Join Date: Jun 2010
Location: Lax
Posts: 4,359
Thanks: 860
Thanked 3,837 Times in 1,902 Posts
Default

Eh all of them can be destroyed in mins with a simple 5inch cut off wheel.
Quick reply to this message
Old 10-11-2019, 07:54 PM
GKII GKII is offline
Hiker
 
Join Date: May 2014
Posts: 619
Thanks: 1,081
Thanked 1,006 Times in 385 Posts
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Pitbull_Dallas View Post
And why not??
For the same reason that a bullet is pushed out of a gun barrel, PRESSURE!
In the case of a fire gun powder burns and expands rapidly, with loaded ammo it will rupture the case or just push the bullet out of the case. But if its in a container that holds pressure (ammo cans or a safe) then the expanding gas builds up to explosive proportions. That's why gun shop that sell powder keep in wooden boxes, because they will blow apart easily instead of becoming a bomb.
Quick reply to this message
Old 10-11-2019, 08:24 PM
Cuteandfuzzybunnies's Avatar
Cuteandfuzzybunnies Cuteandfuzzybunnies is offline
VIP Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2014
Posts: 707
Thanks: 0
Thanked 927 Times in 379 Posts
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by recklessdriver View Post
Eh all of them can be destroyed in mins with a simple 5inch cut off wheel.
A TL30 safe will take 30 minutes to cut open with proper tools and training.
Quick reply to this message
Old 10-11-2019, 08:32 PM
Cuteandfuzzybunnies's Avatar
Cuteandfuzzybunnies Cuteandfuzzybunnies is offline
VIP Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2014
Posts: 707
Thanks: 0
Thanked 927 Times in 379 Posts
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Pitbull_Dallas View Post
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cuteandfuzzybunnies View Post
You shouldn’t keep ammo in a safe.
And why not?? [IMG class=inlineimg]https://www.survivalistboards.com/images/smilies/confused.gif[/IMG]
Several reasons. See the link below.

Basically fire risk. The ammo will damage your guns at lower temps than they will get damaged without ammo there. 1 or two rounds is no big deal but hundreds will be an issue.

Also any significance amount of powder shouldn’t be stored in a pressure tight container.

“ Do not subject the storage cabinets to close confinement. Storage cabinets should be constructed of insulating materials and with a weak wall seams or joints to provide an easy means of self-venting”

Also a chambered round can cook off during a fire and shoot somebody. So if you store guns loaded in a safe keep them in condition 1. Most should be unloaded for safety.

Large amounts of primers should not be stored together there are ways to separate them for safety. Again we aren’t talking about 30 rounds here.

https://gunsafereviewsguy.com/articl...ire-ratings/3/
Quick reply to this message
Old 10-12-2019, 05:03 AM
John_Auberry's Avatar
John_Auberry John_Auberry is offline
Crazy
 
Join Date: Jan 2012
Posts: 5,460
Thanks: 2,560
Thanked 10,249 Times in 3,341 Posts
Default

I use cheap safes as ammo storage. Fire is not going to happen.
Quick reply to this message
Old 10-12-2019, 07:13 AM
Flinter Flinter is offline
Hunter
 
Join Date: Apr 2010
Posts: 1,415
Thanks: 240
Thanked 1,903 Times in 727 Posts
Default

My safe is a short walk away from about 20k dollars worth of assorted tools. There is no way it's going to keep a real thief out.

Fortunately, we don't have any real thieves around here. Just meth heads who look for a smash and grab. For those sorts my safe should be just fine.
Quick reply to this message
The Following User Says Thank You to Flinter For This Useful Post:
Old 10-12-2019, 10:03 AM
arleigh arleigh is offline
Survivor
 
Join Date: Oct 2010
Location: southern california
Posts: 11,739
Thanks: 6,752
Thanked 11,166 Times in 5,702 Posts
Default

I believe hidden rooms are best.
Quick reply to this message
The Following User Says Thank You to arleigh For This Useful Post:
Old 10-12-2019, 12:24 PM
Explainist Explainist is offline
Hunter
 
Join Date: Aug 2013
Posts: 1,595
Thanks: 0
Thanked 3,260 Times in 1,027 Posts
Default

I believe in easy to find safes that hold low value items, and high value items in concealed storage

if they bust the safes open on the scene, they waste their time and effort

if they haul them off, they waste more time and effort, and they are far away when they find out
Quick reply to this message
The Following User Says Thank You to Explainist For This Useful Post:
Old 10-13-2019, 12:20 AM
munik munik is offline
I say I say
 
Join Date: Jan 2012
Location: Western Montana
Age: 42
Posts: 837
Thanks: 240
Thanked 1,337 Times in 505 Posts
Default

And just another warning to all.....
I am a locksmith and safe tech.
If you have an electronic lock that is 5 years old or more... consider having a locksmith swap it out for a mechanical lock (preferably an s&g)...or change it every 5 years.
On Thursday I had to go open another failed s&g 6120 motorized electronic lock on a fortress (heritage economy line 30 minute rated safe).
Lock was manufactured 2007 but the safe purchase was in 2009.
Most of the failed electronics are about 7 years old if used infrequently like most gun safes (1 opening a day or less).
Quick reply to this message
The Following 2 Users Say Thank You to munik For This Useful Post:
Old 10-13-2019, 08:50 AM
Jack Swilling's Avatar
Jack Swilling Jack Swilling is offline
VIP Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2017
Location: Ozarks
Posts: 2,913
Thanks: 4,571
Thanked 6,544 Times in 2,074 Posts
Default

So many electronic locks fail
I am surprised they are even sold anymore
In theory, there should be a good electronic option
But there is not
Don't be that guy

Munik knows what he is talking about
Quick reply to this message
The Following 2 Users Say Thank You to Jack Swilling For This Useful Post:
Old 10-14-2019, 04:37 AM
John_Auberry's Avatar
John_Auberry John_Auberry is offline
Crazy
 
Join Date: Jan 2012
Posts: 5,460
Thanks: 2,560
Thanked 10,249 Times in 3,341 Posts
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by munik View Post
And just another warning to all.....
I am a locksmith and safe tech.
If you have an electronic lock that is 5 years old or more... consider having a locksmith swap it out for a mechanical lock (preferably an s&g)...or change it every 5 years.
On Thursday I had to go open another failed s&g 6120 motorized electronic lock on a fortress (heritage economy line 30 minute rated safe).
Lock was manufactured 2007 but the safe purchase was in 2009.
Most of the failed electronics are about 7 years old if used infrequently like most gun safes (1 opening a day or less).
When I bought my safe it had two keys. Both keys had to turn and then there was a time delay before it opened. I didn’t want to deal with that so I had a safe company swap it out for a S and G lock.
Quick reply to this message
The Following User Says Thank You to John_Auberry For This Useful Post:
Old 10-14-2019, 08:13 PM
Explainist Explainist is offline
Hunter
 
Join Date: Aug 2013
Posts: 1,595
Thanks: 0
Thanked 3,260 Times in 1,027 Posts
Default

You would think the safe manufacturers would put an external power jack on them for when the batteries fail
Quick reply to this message
Old 10-14-2019, 11:54 PM
munik munik is offline
I say I say
 
Join Date: Jan 2012
Location: Western Montana
Age: 42
Posts: 837
Thanks: 240
Thanked 1,337 Times in 505 Posts
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Explainist View Post
You would think the safe manufacturers would put an external power jack on them for when the batteries fail
Almost everything I work on has battery(or batteries) behind the keypad.
I have worked on safes that had a model of Lagard electronic lock that had battery contacts on the face of the keypad for a backup form of providing power to the lock....but I haven't seen one in years.

If you do have an electronic lock, always use Duracell....that goes for safe locks, keyless deadbolts...essentially anything that takes a small battery...put a Duracell in it.

Doesn't hurt to put a volt meter on new batteries before you put them in....I have had a few brand new batteries that weren't fully charged. They are very rare but it is good to check before any battery in anything critical.
Quick reply to this message
Old 10-15-2019, 12:31 AM
Cuteandfuzzybunnies's Avatar
Cuteandfuzzybunnies Cuteandfuzzybunnies is offline
VIP Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2014
Posts: 707
Thanks: 0
Thanked 927 Times in 379 Posts
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by munik View Post
And just another warning to all.....
I am a locksmith and safe tech.
If you have an electronic lock that is 5 years old or more... consider having a locksmith swap it out for a mechanical lock (preferably an s&g)...or change it every 5 years.
On Thursday I had to go open another failed s&g 6120 motorized electronic lock on a fortress (heritage economy line 30 minute rated safe).
Lock was manufactured 2007 but the safe purchase was in 2009.
Most of the failed electronics are about 7 years old if used infrequently like most gun safes (1 opening a day or less).
Nice to see a fellow locksmith.

And I agree , no electric locks on real safes. For fast access I guess they are ok.
Quick reply to this message
The Following User Says Thank You to Cuteandfuzzybunnies For This Useful Post:
Old 10-15-2019, 12:38 AM
Lava Lava is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2019
Posts: 60
Thanks: 208
Thanked 90 Times in 41 Posts
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by munik View Post
Almost everything I work on has battery(or batteries) behind the keypad.
I have worked on safes that had a model of Lagard electronic lock that had battery contacts on the face of the keypad for a backup form of providing power to the lock....but I haven't seen one in years.

If you do have an electronic lock, always use Duracell....that goes for safe locks, keyless deadbolts...essentially anything that takes a small battery...put a Duracell in it.

Doesn't hurt to put a volt meter on new batteries before you put them in....I have had a few brand new batteries that weren't fully charged. They are very rare but it is good to check before any battery in anything critical.
I hope you don't mean duracell copper tops. They ooze and corrode battery compartments. Over the years they have changed something in the manufacutre of those batteries, used to be a good choice. No longer.
Quick reply to this message
Old 10-15-2019, 12:43 AM
Lava Lava is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2019
Posts: 60
Thanks: 208
Thanked 90 Times in 41 Posts
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Cuteandfuzzybunnies View Post
Several reasons. See the link below.

Basically fire risk. The ammo will damage your guns at lower temps than they will get damaged without ammo there. 1 or two rounds is no big deal but hundreds will be an issue.

Also any significance amount of powder shouldn’t be stored in a pressure tight container.

“ Do not subject the storage cabinets to close confinement. Storage cabinets should be constructed of insulating materials and with a weak wall seams or joints to provide an easy means of self-venting”

Also a chambered round can cook off during a fire and shoot somebody. So if you store guns loaded in a safe keep them in condition 1. Most should be unloaded for safety.

Large amounts of primers should not be stored together there are ways to separate them for safety. Again we aren’t talking about 30 rounds here.

https://gunsafereviewsguy.com/articl...ire-ratings/3/
Don't know if you read your link, it appears there is no risk of bulk ammo "exploding" your gun safe? So if all you store in your ammo safe is ammo, I don't see an issue.

Powder, yes.
Quick reply to this message
The Following User Says Thank You to Lava For This Useful Post:
Old 10-15-2019, 06:27 AM
Pitbull_Dallas's Avatar
Pitbull_Dallas Pitbull_Dallas is offline
Survivor
 
Join Date: May 2015
Posts: 9,735
Thanks: 11,179
Thanked 28,547 Times in 7,454 Posts
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by munik View Post
Almost everything I work on has battery(or batteries) behind the keypad.
I have worked on safes that had a model of Lagard electronic lock that had battery contacts on the face of the keypad for a backup form of providing power to the lock....but I haven't seen one in years.

If you do have an electronic lock, always use Duracell....that goes for safe locks, keyless deadbolts...essentially anything that takes a small battery...put a Duracell in it.

Doesn't hurt to put a volt meter on new batteries before you put them in....I have had a few brand new batteries that weren't fully charged. They are very rare but it is good to check before any battery in anything critical.
Why Duracell and not some other battery? When I bought my safe I had read something similar prior that said the same thing and then when I looked at the owners manual it says Duracell or energizer. Just curious on the thinking on only Duracell. It was adamant on it bring an alkaline battery though..
Quick reply to this message
Reply

Bookmarks



Quick Reply
Message:
Options

Register Now

In order to be able to post messages on the Survivalist Forum forums, you must first register.
Please enter your desired user name, your email address and other required details in the form below.
User Name:
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.
Password:
Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.
Email Address:
Gender
Insurance
Please select your insurance company (Optional)

Log-in

Human Verification

In order to verify that you are a human and not a spam bot, please enter the answer into the following box below based on the instructions contained in the graphic.



Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 04:26 AM.


Powered by vBulletin®
Copyright ©2000 - 2019, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Search Engine Optimisation provided by DragonByte SEO (Lite) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2019 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.
vBulletin Security provided by vBSecurity v2.2.2 (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2019 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.
Copyright © Kevin Felts 2006 - 2015,
Green theme by http://www.themesbydesign.net