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Old 02-21-2010, 07:03 AM
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Originally Posted by Marcy View Post
Half-pint mason jars, with O2/moisture absorbers and vacuum sealed, make excellent seed containers.

As for frivolous plants, while perhaps the first year after a disaster or collapse one would wish to focus on nutrition dense foods, also imagine the second year, and the indescribable taste of fresh watermelon, and what joy it would bring. In my mind, preparing for a post-collapse world is not only preserving life, but preserving humanity.
How do you vacuum seal a mason jar? I'm honestly curious/interested Are you talking like a canning method in water?
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Old 03-05-2010, 07:13 AM
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The list of suggested seeds to save is good, but don't forget such healthful plants as broccoli, spinach, chard and kale. The vitamin contents are very high, and they are super easy to grow. I store my seeds in a cool, dark place, and have very good germination even 4-5 years after. superseeds.com is an excellent source for heirloom seeds, and they carry many international varieties for diversity.
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Old 03-08-2010, 05:20 PM
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Default survival garden

In my experience, even when little else grows, even zucchini, green beans will thrive. Plow under the plants after harvest to add nitrogen to the soil. these are easy to can, seeds can be harvested for next seasons planting. very forgiving plant
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Old 03-08-2010, 05:22 PM
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better to get a good reference book, different things require different canning methods and supplies. if you just want to seal jars, there is an attachment to a vacuum sealer that will do that.
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Old 03-08-2010, 06:56 PM
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Originally Posted by auntpugsy View Post
In my experience, even when little else grows, even zucchini, green beans will thrive. Plow under the plants after harvest to add nitrogen to the soil. these are easy to can, seeds can be harvested for next seasons planting. very forgiving plant
Knowing very little about gardening(family learning), I was surprised to go out to a garden box we had going during summer and to dig up the dirt at the end of still winter to find carrots under the dirt! I couldnt believe this was happening during a freezing winter, they grew through it it fine!! That is a hardy vegetable!
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Old 03-09-2010, 06:46 PM
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I just wanted to make sure and mention something about seed storage. Heat kills seeds, whether by hot water, dehydrator, or even the sun. Depending on the variety, temperatures as low as 110 degrees F can decrease your germination rate while temperatures above 140 degrees will likely kill most garden seeds in a short time. The best way to seal seeds is with a vacuum of some kind rather than heat displaced air methods.
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Old 03-09-2010, 07:00 PM
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Default nut trees

Hazelnuts and turkish trazels grow well here in NH.
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Old 11-12-2010, 10:14 PM
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I like the idea of the charity stock for friends and family. I'll have to do that.
About keeping seeds; I have used seeds that were 10 years old and have had pretty good luck with some seeds. Newer seeds are better of course but I figured if I had them, I might as well try to get some good out of them. I keep my seeds in a big plastic tub (not really air tight) in the basement (Not completely dry sometimes).
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Old 11-12-2010, 11:11 PM
lanahi lanahi is offline
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You can improve your own non-hybrid plants through a few plant generations. For instance, corn: Save seeds from the best ears only every year. If you have a plant that doesn't get a virus while the others around it are, save seeds from it. If you want an early vegetable, save seeds from the first one that produces, etc., etc. This is how heirlooms were improved over the years.

Heirlooms, by the way, are just older non-hybrids, usually over 50 years old. They have proven their worth so they are still available, otherwise they'd be allowed to disappear like many others. But ANY non-hybrid seed can be saved...it doesn't have to be an heirloom.

Also, non-hybrid, standard, and open-pollinated are all words for the same thing.

If it doesn't SAY hybrid, it usually isn't. Hybrids are usually more expensive because they are patented. It's takes much money and time to develop a good hybrid, which is why they are more expensive. A good hybrid will often be a better plant the first year, but the seeds saved from them will either not germinate again a second year or will be inferior to the original plant. So, get some hybrids if you want and are careful not to cross-pollinate them with non-hybrids you are growing at the same time, but consider them a one-time deal.

I think the seed banks in a can are a rip-off because of the expense and lack of choice. Many will not grow well in your area, and you do not have the varieties you want. You can do much, much better by ordering them seperately through an online catalog where you can pick out the ideal varieties for your situation, and you'll save much money by doing it that way.

I save seeds in canning jars, just dry and tightly sealed. A few seeds, like carrots, do not save well from year to year, and all vegetable seeds will have poor germination by about the fifth year in storage. This makes it better if you can plant the seeds sooner, even if you have to rotate them. (Like planting a packet of tomatoes and saving the seed from them for the next one or two years, instead of waiting five years to plant an old packet.)

If you have little land, you can test germinate older seeds in a wet paper towel folded over them. If most of them still germinate, they are good to plant in a small space.

I do have extra seeds I can give or trade with the neighbors. It would make it ideal if most of them grow something different and we can all trade vegetables with each other. Seeds will be valuable trade items and so will the vegetables grown from them.
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Old 11-13-2010, 02:09 AM
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Default A simple way to remove all the air

Quote:
Originally Posted by XS29L View Post
I just wanted to make sure and mention something about seed storage. Heat kills seeds, whether by hot water, dehydrator, or even the sun. Depending on the variety, temperatures as low as 110 degrees F can decrease your germination rate while temperatures above 140 degrees will likely kill most garden seeds in a short time. The best way to seal seeds is with a vacuum of some kind rather than heat displaced air methods.
light a match drop it in the jar and close the lid . when the flame goes out there is no more air.period.
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Old 11-13-2010, 09:08 AM
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I am guessing that a lot of people here are new to gardening an as such ,they should know that not all plants set seeds the first year,,,some like beans an corn do but carrots ,beets ,turnips usualy dont,,you need to keep them growing into the second year befor you get seeds ,,,not a big deal if your in a warm area ,,but extrem cold will freeze the roots an kill the plants ,,so no seeds,,,
I am in a extreme cold area so im trying to keep the roots overwinter in the rootcellar and replant in the spring
i had a fairly good year this year as far as garden but im more proud of the seeds i saved than the food i got,,,an i got lots ,,lol over 900 lbs of spuds an 104 quarts of green beans in freezer
as well as the 104 quarts of green beans i froze i roughly got between 8 an 16 times the seeds i planted,,so i can plant the same amount for the next 8 years an in some cases longer
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Old 11-13-2010, 12:41 PM
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I've grown a few vegetable varieties and herbs here in Southwest Florida. One lettuce variety that has always been amazing has been a leaf lettuce known as Mesclun (Gourmet Greens Mixture). The seed brand name is Ferry-Morse.

I grow it in a container of composted cow manure + peat moss. In the summer heat I grow it in filtered shade and in the winter I grow it in sun. Super easy to grow and it grows very fast keeping me supplied with lettuce for salads and sandwiches. Minimal effort, lots of reward.

I made a video about it:

Not from seed but- Another thing that's worked really well for me is green onion. I use fresh grocery store green onion, cutting the greens to use in cooking and then planting the bulbs (sets) in a composted cow manure/ peat moss mixture. The bulbs take root quickly and the greens grow out quickly so you're harvesting in no time. Minimal effort and lots of reward.
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Old 11-13-2010, 02:06 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by hunterwolf View Post
Has any one tried http://www.survivalseedbank.com/ they offer an expensive deal but it is tempting..was wondering if their seeds worked.
Whatever you do, make sure you set yourself up for a four-season harvest. Gardening in only one season, which the Survival Seed Bank is heavily geared toward, will require that you force massive productivity in a short season, with few failures, and force you to preserve everything throughout the remaining 8 months of the year. A four season harvest guarantees you year-round fresh food, spaces out the work, takes advantage of the natural offerings of each season, and lessens the impact of failures.
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Old 10-16-2011, 06:10 PM
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Seed Storage

According to the National Seed Storage Lab at Ft.
Collins, CO, seeds have three enemies:fresh air, moisture and
heat. They have established an optimum moisture content for each
seed for long life.This ranges from 4-8%.Common seed is sold around
12-14% moisture. Proper Temperatures are Key

Storing your seeds in proper conditions is vital. If stored at
room temperatures, they will last perhaps 2-3 years. For each
10the temperature is lowered, the seed life will double:

32 50+ years

42 25 years

52 12 1/2 years

62 6 years

72 3 years

82 1 year

90 and above-not recommended
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Old 10-19-2011, 07:46 AM
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i tried an experiment this year 2011 to see what or how the garden would grow just by letting the rain water the garden. there was no fertilizer used. the test was to see if the vegetables would grow naturally. i put out cucumbers corn pumpkins strawberries lettuce tomatoes peppers onions asparagus broccoli and some herbs. purchased a one row seed drill two years ago. a lot of work putting out that many seeds. also put out winter wheat the year before. and oats. i tried to keep the weeds down.

the square foot garden had sage still growing from three years ago. one tomato plant is still trying to produce one tomato in the container garden. some pepper plants came up but did not produce any peppers. the peas planted this year did not come up. the peas from the year before did produce a good amount.

the push tiller i have does not do as good of job as the neighbors 66inch tractor tiller.

so how did these vegetables survive on their own in the wild ?

saving seeds i use a food saver to wrap in the plastic and suck all the air out. then put the food saver packs in the fridge and freezer. since the seed packs are already labeled and weighed it works. also use a food saver jar to suck all the air out of a mason jar. by putting the small mason jar in the food saver jar it will suck all the air out without using any heat. and by doing that way the mason jar lids are reusable for short term. or until they are put in a water bath to can the normal way. i do it that way to avoid putting heat to the seeds.

tried another experiment half of the oats were cast and half were sown. the half sown did much better with a higher yield of plants growing.

none of the vegetables came up from the tilled garden. the sqf garden and container garden produced very little. except the sage that produced a large amount.
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Old 12-22-2011, 12:54 PM
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Default Seeds

I have not read every entry in the seed storage forum concerning hybrid seeds however i did want to add that I have a preference for a hybrid tomato that was developed by Utah State University called DX-54-12. It produces excellent amounts of tomatoes during the summer and early fall months. My findings on this topic of seed storage of hybrids is that every year after I have planted these tomato plants, I always find volunteer tomato plants come the following year. Many of these I have tended and grown and they have produced right along with the other plants I have planted. I'm sure that most hybrids do not reproduce like this but these certainly have.
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Old 02-15-2012, 09:05 PM
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Default Not a TOP 5, but I would keep watermelon seeds.

Watermelon nutrients include vitamin C, anti-oxidants, amino acids and has some anti-inflammatory properties too. It good for asthma type symptoms so may be beneficial with ash/other air pollutants. It grows in the dirt between rocks on our rock pile where my kids spit their seeds every summer, so it can grow wild, no care. Rocks keep soil (and roots) moist, crawling vine leaves spread over warm rocks and get plenty of sun. Note in a good drought, if it rains hard, pick and eat them, as they will split the next day.

For diabetics-in a pinch can help level load your sugars, boil water pour over approx 2 tsp rind, let steep 4 min and drink all down. Do AM and PM.

Sunburn/poinson oak-put flesh over skin will help sooth, cool and heal skin

Constipation-eat flesh and especially some of white rind to loosen bowels.

Kidney stones/suspected kidney problems? Grind about 1T of the seeds as fine as you can, add several cups boiling water, let steep 4 min, strain, drink the liquid.

All recs survival situation ONLY, I am not a Doc.
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Old 02-15-2012, 09:36 PM
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Originally Posted by flyinkel View Post
Kidney stones/suspected kidney problems? Grind about 1T of the seeds as fine as you can, add several cups boiling water, let steep 4 min, strain, drink the liquid.
Thanks for this. I'm dealing with a stone right now and nothing is helping.
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Old 02-15-2012, 10:27 PM
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Newbie, so I don't know how to send you a private msg. Send me a msg and hopefully I will be able to figure out how to reply. Will give rundown of what I would try. Watermelon seeds not first choice, but won't harm. Take good care.
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Old 09-05-2013, 03:38 PM
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that's awesome!!!
if anyone is interested in a great way to grow those seeds, that's totally self sustainable, organic, and also produces delicious fish, then check out dreamaquaponics.com !
\
we're also offering a 10% rebate to all prepper network members on aquaponic systems and plans / blueprints!! Get started today!
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