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Old 01-08-2008, 09:31 AM
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Default High production plants



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This spring I want to plant some high production vegetables.

Some of the plants I have in mind are cucumbers, snap beans, squash, zucchini, okra and grape tomatoes. My garden here at the house is not going to be very big, so I need stuff that produces more then once, as compared to corn.

The bigger garden will be planted up at the camp. The purple hull peas, water melons and corn will be planted up there.

So, any other suggestions for high production vegetables that I can grow?
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Old 01-08-2008, 09:43 AM
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Food,....er, vegetables for thought
carrots
onions
eggplant
green or wax beans
bell peppers
garlic
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Old 01-08-2008, 09:50 AM
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Sweet peppers.
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Old 01-08-2008, 09:56 AM
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on the tomato subject, here is a space save project I'm going to do this year.

Growing Tomatos Upside Down
http://www.oklahomahistory.net/tomatos.html
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Old 01-08-2008, 10:32 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by madcritter View Post
on the tomato subject, here is a space save project I'm going to do this year.

Growing Tomatos Upside Down
http://www.oklahomahistory.net/tomatos.html
You might notice in one of the pictures of the hanging containers, there is a water hose in the back ground. If you plan on growing any tomatoes in containers, get ready to water two or three times a day when the plants get big. They suck the water big time when it gets hot.

Radishes produce lots of product. To bad I hate radishes.
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Old 01-08-2008, 11:10 AM
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You might consider 'double' cropping. Plant an early crop (mustard/turnip greens, broccoli, cauliflower, carrots etc) then follow it up with another 'hot' weather crop for late spring and early summer. Okra, tomatoes, peppers etc do very well in hotter temps and even need soil temps to be elevated in order to germinate properly. Talk with your county agent about double cropping and see what they suggest.
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Old 01-08-2008, 12:38 PM
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Beans is my absolutely favorite. Seem to always grow well. Beets, kohlrabi adn rhubarb are also easy.
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Old 01-08-2008, 12:41 PM
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Green beans, swiss chard, and collard greens are my big ones. two rows of beans, and 1 row each of the others are all I need for my normal useage.
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Old 01-08-2008, 01:17 PM
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Any vegetable produce a lot of food.
Kev, also try to combine crops in one plot in the same time (if you don't use herbicides). I think now at one plot with corn, beans (will use corn stalk instead a wood prop), cucumbers, squash, zucchini and pumpkins. All in the same field.
But take care to not preserve seeds from squash, zucchini and pumpkins, be cause it is a high chance of cross polination (are from the same family and easily cross polinate).

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Old 01-08-2008, 01:40 PM
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Behind my house I am going to have a 10 foot by 20 foot garden plot. The raised beds I usually grow stuff in need a break for a full year.

1st row - 1/2 in snap beans, 1/2 in okra.

2nd row - 1/2 in radishes and 1/2 in carrots.

3rd row - squash and zuchinni.

The grape tomatoes are high producers, I only need 2 or 3 plants or those and my family will have more tomatoes then we can eat.

The cucumbers will be planted to the side of the rows with some kind of rack for them to climb.
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Old 01-08-2008, 01:48 PM
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Very good
Just remember, to rotate the crops in each year. Your planting order is great for rotation (1- beans/okra; 2- radishes/carots; 3- squash/zuchinni).
Beans fix nitrogen in the land, radishes consume it and zuchinni do great in poor land.
Again, take care at seeds (squash/zuchinni).
My 0/02$,

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Old 01-08-2008, 01:57 PM
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Leaf lettuce is a great continuing producer... cut it and it grows again. It can also be grown in those long narrow plastic planters, just make sure to use some finished compost in the bottom of the planter.

Peppers, tomatoes, beans, peas, cucumbers are all great long term producers. If you keep the plant picked of any mature fruit, it will "think" it has not completed its job (to reproduce, i.e., produce seed) and will continue to produce.

Kitty
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Old 01-09-2008, 10:23 AM
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About rhubarbs I'll add a few things. After you used the stalks, the root will live through the winter and start producing the next season. It's best to start with a plant, they can be split and moved. This is a terrific plant since it produces dessert food. Great comforter! Helps if you have sugar to add to the dishes though. I haer you can add it to meat dishes too but I've never tried it. Also makes great wine. Never ever eat the leaves. Cook only in iron or stainless steel pans.
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