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Old 09-12-2019, 10:09 AM
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Default Attributes and requirements of your “survival” EDC Folder?



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Okay, let me preface with saying that a folding knife is not my first choice for a “survival” cutting tool, as a fixed blade will always be my first choice if allowed. That said, EDC is something you should have with you all the time and most of us just can’t get by with carrying a 7” survival fixed blade very day. So please, avoid the typical “carry the right tool for the job” comments…this discussion isn’t for you.

Context is always necessary, so while some of us have legal restrictions, those must be acknowledged. Others often choose to carry a “gentleman’s” folder or even a small SAK simply due to their work environment; I don’t want to gloss over those constraints. Additionally, some work in an environment where a multitool is perfectly acceptable, and they are likely a top choice for versatility.

If I’m heading into the woods, I will likely have a folder on me, but also more prepared with more appropriate tools for specific tasks. This isn’t that scenario. Prior to my retirement from the Army, I did a couple of mock bug-home exercises. Nothing extravagant. I just had a small bag, drove to a local State Park about 20 minutes from the home, hiked about 4-6 miles into a primitive camp site and practiced a few skills. I did use a folder (Emerson if I recall), and while I did EDC a fixed blade, I stuck to the folder. I also carried a multitool, and they are fair game and versatile EDC tools. I found myself this summer mostly just carrying a single pocket folder given my attire and “vacation” mindset.

So, strictly focusing your attention on the primary pocket folder you typically EDC, what do you expect it to accomplish if you had to bust out of the office, town/city, etc., and hit a more-or-less suburban/rural environment? Yes, not all face this exact landscape or scenario, but work with me here. What attributes do you like in said folder and what do you expect it to accomplish if you had a minimalist bugout kit and this was your primary cutting tool?

I consider my folding knife just like my handgun. It’s the most convenient tool to have with me all the time, but is meant to help me survive and fight my way back to a more substantial and better performing tool (be that a rifle or a fixed blade knife).

I was recently reflecting on an article the late Chris Janowsky published over 20 years ago. He defined his needs for want he wanted to accomplish with a knife and focused on the pocket folder as the more likely knife to have on his person 24/7.

According to Chris Janowsky, of the World Survival Institute, in a July 1996 article in American Survival Guide,

Quote:
Let's look at the tasks a folding knife should be able to perform in a wilderness survival situation:

Field dress both big and small game
Quarter and butcher big and small game
Gut and or fillet large and small fish
Cut large diameter rope with a single slice
Cut and carve hardwoods (Oak, Walnut, Hickory etc.) to improvise tools and shelters
Drill holes in hardwood with the point
Small enough to fit in your pocket
Light weight (5 oz. or less)
Strong enough to split firewood by pounding on it with another piece of wood.
Hold an edge sharp enough to shave with
Large enough for close quarter combat
Lifetime guarantee (this sounds like a marketing plug...)

If a folding knife cannot perform these tasks easily and efficiently, it is not the survival knife you need. Remember the bottom line is, your life may well depend on it.
After putting numerous commercial offerings available at the time, his selection was the Benchmade AFCK, at that time in the liner lock version. You can agree or disagree with his requirements and parameters, but it gives you an idea of one man’s philosophy. Needless to say, I enjoyed the article and he put that folder to the test doing exactly that.

So, I was motivated to pull a few of my folders out needing to do some inventorying and decided what would be “ideal” for me.

Blade length and profile
Locking mechanism
Overall build
Handle comfort

I have some mega-sized folders, but 4” is about as big as I can comfortably go with a pocket folder. Most bushcraft knife gurus always mention having a knife (fixed blade) with a blade at least four inches to accomplish the majority of typical “bush-type” tasks. I don’t disagree with this assessment.

Blade profile is tricky and there are dozens to choose from these days. I prefer a clip, drop-pointed, or even a spear pointed design. I do think tip strength is important for harsher tasks than just slicing, but we have to remember a knife isn’t a pry bar, and folding knives especially, are disadvantaged from hard use simply because they’re a folding blade. Technique is critical. Not that I have a need or would attempt it, but a guy on the ‘tube’ cut down a pretty large diameter tree (8” or so) with a folding knife and didn’t damage the knife…their capabilities are mostly limited by your skill and imagination. Modern folders are actually pretty tough.

Locking mechanism are important; they are “folding” knives. Lock-back knives have been around for almost a hundred years and modern versions like the Tri-Ad have made them even more robust and stout. Liner locks (which is what Janowsky used) are a little controversial. I only trust liner locks from a few companies with good reputations (Benchmade, Spyderco, Emerson, Al Mar), but it’s not my top lock I would consider with other choices these days. I still like the lock-back, Spyderco’s compression lock, Benchmade’s Axis lock and similar variations, and some button locks and frame locks (like the Sebenza).

Knife construction is important. I don’t necessarily need it to be bomb-proof, but I want tough scales (typically G10), good pins, possibly steel liners, etc.

Handle comfort is important, but it’s never really noticed until you try carving a spoon or bowl. Sharp edges, non-ergonomic handles, too thing of handles, etc. can create hotspots and lead to blisters. While I like a folder to fit my hand well and be secure in my grip, I’ve found a necessary balance if you actually plan to use your folder for long periods of time.

Small features I like are fast opening mechanisms such as flipper models, blades with a “wave” feature, dual-opening methods, deep pocket clips, etc. They’re not deal breakers, but nice-to-have features.

The type of blade steel isn’t as much as a concern to me as is the above. Chances are, if I’m just looking at EDC, I probably won’t have a sharpener on me, so I do want a steel that can keep a decent edge for the short term.

My EDC fluctuates to some degree but the four main items I always carry (where legal) is my CCW, folding pocket knife, flashlight, and a Bic lighter.

What I expect from my folding knife is of course, cutting things, but for projects, I have used a folder to cut saplings to make a debris hut frame, carve a bow-drill set, make a half-dozen figure four traps, carve a spoon, cut out the top of an empty aluminum can (to serve as a pot), process small wood to get a fire going, gut/clean small game or fish, are carve any other necessary tools such as stakes, digging stick, etc.

Just some different designs:

The original AFCK (liner lock and axis lock versions) along with what I consider a good replacement in Benchmade’s Crooked River version (if you can stomach Benchmade’s anti-2A antics):




Some drop-point variations:




Upswept or trailing point folders. I carried the Emerson CQC8 for years in the Army and love the blade profile. The Hogue auto has another nice upswept blade that is both stout and an excellent edge profile:




For those familiar with Doug Ritter, this is his RSK folder made originally by Benchmade and now from Hogue. Hogue is definitely the nicer of the two, but I still love the light weight and balance of Benchmade’s version. These blade profiles are some of the best. While more of a drop point, they have a very wide blade with flat grind and are simply some of the best slicers without sacrificing blade strength:




Some different stout folders (LionSteel SR-11A, Integral frame lock; ZT 0909; Benchmade Adamas Auto; Al Mar’s SERE 2000)




I really like Spyderco’s Military. It’s a very lightweight folder that is a tremendous slicer. It’s not the most robust blade profile, but has been used hard all over the world. This is actually one that I carried as a secondary (weakside pocket) folder:




While the Cold Steel 4MAX does have a 4” blade, it’s a massive folder. I did add a deep pocket clip and it will carry just fine if you have big enough pockets. It’s a heavy brute, but very capable; it’s also one of the strongest locks on the market for a folder if that’s a big concern. To be honest, for the weight, I would choose a fixed blade, but if limited to a folder and if you could carry the beast, it would be a top choice capable of handling more fixed-bade chores than other folders (it’s alongside the liner lock Benchmade AFCK tested by Janowsky):




Probably my top four choices these days. I’ve carried and used the RSK and CQC10 the most; excellent blades with subtle differences. I prefer the axis lock to the a liner lock though. Since the discontinuation of the AFCK model, it took me a while to really appreciate that particular design. I’m glad the Hunt Crooked River is now an option as it’s a great replacement and I love the design and profile. Lastly, a folder that has grown on me is Spyderco’s Shaman with a compression lock. The blade is stout and a very utilitarian profile. The best aspect is the handle. It’s one of the few folding knife handles that are actually very comfortable to use for extended periods:



Just a few thoughts and questions for hump day!

ROCK6
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Old 09-12-2019, 10:15 AM
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Great post
As much as I hate Benchmade, my Crooked River seems not to be beat
Bought it before my personal Benchmade ban
Exact version you have pictured
Would love to have a Demko magic knife
# 2 for me is my medium Cold Steel Voyager, but not really heavy duty
It is easy to carry, that is a plus, and I do not doubt its ability to get me though a problem
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Old 09-12-2019, 10:29 AM
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The one general purpose folder I tend to be carrying these days is the Kabar Dozier precision hunter.
https://www.amazon.com/KA-BAR-KAB406...8302282&sr=8-4



I've never tried batoning or killing a moose with it, but it is a handy, lightweight knife that disappears in my pocket and is easy to grab and open with 1 hand.

I like flipper designs, but this one has no flipper.

If the world was on fire, I would grab something larger I suppose, like my Boker Great Knight Magnum (seems to have disappeared completely from the internet) or the CRKT Cruiser. Both are way more than I want to casually lug around and also explain to any polite company that sees them.

I have 2 other EDC knives that my brain tells me I should carry, but I just don't

One is the Kershaw Ignitor, and the other a Kershaw AlMar. Really excellent quality on both, and I just don't carry them. In fact, I don't even know where the AlMar is at the moment.
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Old 09-12-2019, 11:14 AM
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I'm going with the knife that I would most probably have in my pocket.
A SAK Farmer.
Certainly not the sturdiest knife in the world,not made with a "super steel" and just not very tactical looking.
But it will get most knife jobs done.

Sure a knife is important,but it isn't the MOST important or even the MOST useful thing you could have.

I'd pick a full nalgene and an AMK Heatsheet and a good light...THEN a knife.

That's just me though and I might die because I might have picked the wrong knife.

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Old 09-12-2019, 01:02 PM
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I don't typically carry a locking folder in my pocket. I've spent several decades carrying some combination of the Buck 110, Leatherman or something with a marlin spike on my belt and they have served me well. I have several of the Kobalt pouches that will either fit on a belt or I sometimes CCW in my strong side pocket and carry the Schrade in the pouch in my right side pocket. The wide flap on the pouch keeps the spike release from wearing a hole in my jeans but isn't too bulky.
I've hovered the mouse several times over a button to buy a Spyderco Tusk - upswept but small locking blade in LC200N with a stainless 'spike' and titanium scales. So far I've been able to resist. I've also been sorely tempted by a 'lefty' Sebenza.
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Old 09-12-2019, 02:14 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Major Mjolnir View Post
I don't typically carry a locking folder in my pocket. I've spent several decades carrying some combination of the Buck 110, Leatherman or something with a marlin spike on my belt and they have served me well. I have several of the Kobalt pouches that will either fit on a belt or I sometimes CCW in my strong side pocket and carry the Schrade in the pouch in my right side pocket. The wide flap on the pouch keeps the spike release from wearing a hole in my jeans but isn't too bulky.
I've hovered the mouse several times over a button to buy a Spyderco Tusk - upswept but small locking blade in LC200N with a stainless 'spike' and titanium scales. So far I've been able to resist. I've also been sorely tempted by a 'lefty' Sebenza.
LC200N is very tempting. I’m
Considering a Spyderco Autonomy 2 is the same steel. I really prefer automatic knives for EDC and love the corrosion resistance of that steel.
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Old 09-12-2019, 02:27 PM
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I think one really has to look at what you really use a knife for.

I EDC a buck automatic knife. 3” blade , sv30 steel , auto with aluminum handle/ g10 grips. I also usually have a multi tool
On my belt of in the console of my vehicle.

Is this optimum for building a shelter or killing an angry bear , no. But it is better than nothing in the woods and perfect for my EDC tasks.

Most of my knife use is opening packages. After that cutting string/chord and sometimes minor food prep like slicing an apple or some cheese.

I also need a knife that I can use defensively in an emergency. And one that can help me cut myself lose from anything I’m tangled up in like a seatbelt or clothing should I be injured.

Sure woods uses are important if you need to survive. But i am usually packing a fixed blade anytime I am near the woods and the folder is a backup.
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Old 09-12-2019, 02:30 PM
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A blade with a point that I can keep clean and a little saw. Throw in a screwdriver and I am pretty happy.

I tend towards the bigger Swiss army knives.

Making a stretcher, walking stick, digging stick, spear or a splint is about the extent of my knife use of survival craft.

I can do a really crappy shelter without a knife pretty much.

I can baton with a folder if I wanted to. Just don't lock the blade.

https://youtu.be/NmobGp08JN8

I also have a PLB which is probably handier. So if I am out trekking and break my leg or something I should be ok.
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Old 09-13-2019, 12:21 AM
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I have found this useful:

KNIFE STEEL

Steel Type Characteristics- Approximate Rockwell Hardness

17-7 PH
Good corrosion resistance, excellent for water sports applications. This alloy is a chromium-nickel-aluminum precipitation hardening stainless steel with good edge retention. Great corrosion resistance generally means a high chromium content, and this means knives made with this steel will be a little harder to sharpen than blades with a lower chromium content. 54-56

154 CM
Originally designed for jet engine fan blades, it is the precursor to the Japanese made ATS-34. In recent years, this steel has made a resurgence in the knife industry, offering good blade toughness, edge holding capability and corrosion resistance. Fairly easy to resharpen. 58-62

420
A hard, strong blade steel. This stainless steel is commonly used in knife blades, and offers good corrosion resistance at a low cost. Decent edge holding capabilities and fairly easy to resharpen, this steel is a good balance of the most desirable traits for knife steel. 49-53

420 HC
A high carbon version of 420 steel, this steel combines the excellent wear resistance of high carbon alloys with the corrosion resistance of chromium stainless steels. The high carbon content makes this steel harder to resharpen, but the tradeoff is better edge holding properties. 58

440 A
A high carbon stainless steel, used in many production knives. A good balance of edge retention, easy resharpening and corrosion resistance. 55-57

440 C
A high chromium stainless steel which exibits an excellent balance of hardness and corrosion resistance. This steel takes a nice edge, and is fairly easy to sharpen even for a novice. 58-60

1095
This is a plain carbon steel, which means it has low resistance to corrosion, and low to medium edge retention. The benefit of this steel is it's easy to sharpen, will take an extremely sharp edge and is generally available at a low cost.
56-58

5150
A medium carbon, low alloy steel that hardens well. This steel is ideally suited to blades with a very thick cross-section such as tomahawks and axes. Extremely tough and impact resistant, this steel is most often used on blades which are hafted and/or thrown. 55-60

ATS-34
A very high carbon, chromium stainless steel with additional amounts of molybdenum. This steel has good edge holding properties and high corossion resistance, but is more difficult to resharpen than lower chromium steels. 60-61

AUS 6A
A medium to high carbon stainless steel, this steel holds a good edge and is particularly well suited for heavy, long blades that are subjected to a lot of stress while chopping and hacking. It has good edge retention, and is fairly easy to resharpen with decent corrosion resistance. 55-57

AUS 8
A Japanese stainless steel, with surperb toughness and good edge holding capabilities. This steel is fairly easy to sharpen and generally low cost with great corrosion resistance. 57-58

AUS 8A
A high carbon, low chromium stainless steel which has proven itself to be the ultimate compromise between toughness and strength, edge holding and resistance to corrosion. 57-59

BG-42
A high quality, bearing grade alloy with significantly increased amounts of carbon and molybdenum content plus vanadium for improved edge retention and strength. Easy to sharpen, with decent corrosion resistance. 61-62

Carbon V®
This low alloy, cutlery grade steel is superior to most other steels due to its chemistry. Decent corossion resistance with superior edge retention make this a premium steel for knife blades. This steel is exceptionally tough, and therefore harder to sharpen than most stainless steels. 59

CPM S30V®
This American made and engineered steel was created especially for the knife industry. It is a powder made steel with uniform structure and great corrosion resistance. Excellent edge retention and first rate toughness make this steel one of the best all-around knife steels, striking a balance between corrosion resistance, edge retention and sharpenability. 58-60

D2
This air hardened tool steel is sometimes called a "semi-stainless" steel, because it contains 12% chromium. It offers decent corrosion resistance with exceptional edge retention. It is harder to sharpen than most, but can be finished to a high-polish shine. 59-60

Damascus
This steel is made from dissimilar steels folded or fused together with heat. It is often acid etched, which brings out the different steels in a striped pattern. Excellent toughness and edge holding capabilities make it a great blade, but the cost of production is high. Damascus is most often used in special applications like decorative blades. Layers vary from 53-62

M2
This high-speed, tool grade steel is used primarily in cutting tools in industrial applications. This is metal used to cut metal. With excellent strength, enduring toughness and tremendous wear resistance, this is some of the toughest steel used to make knife blades. The tradeoff for all this toughness is that this steel is hard to sharpen, and it is highly susceptable to corrosion. All blades made from this steel will have a corrosion resistant coating applied, to give good corrosion resistance with such a tough steel. 62

N690
An Austrian made stainless steel, it is comparable to 440C in performance. It offers good edge holding qualities with excellent corrosion resistance, and fairly easy sharpening. 58-60

S30V
This steel contains carbon along with high amounts of chromium, molybdenum and vanadium. This steel is double tempered for hardness and edge retention.It has excellent corrosion resistance, but is slightly more difficult to sharpen.
59.5-61

Sandvik 12C27
This stainless steel is made in Sweden. It is generally known as a premium steel for knife blades, offering a good balance of corrosion resistance, sharpenability and edge retention. 57-59

San Mai III
San Mai means "three layers". It is a term used when talking about traditional Japanese swords and daggers. The laminated construction is important because it allows the blade maker to combine different grades of steel in a single blade. A high carbon center layer provides the strength and edge holding qualities, while the outer layers are lower carbon steels, providing flexibility.
Center layer= 59 Outer layers= 57

X-15 T.N
Developed for the aircraft industry for jet ball bearings, and used in the medical industry for scalpels, this steel resists rust in the worst of conditions while maintaining ample edge retention. Offering an easy to maintain edge and excellent corrosion resistance, this steel is ideal in knives used for watersports.
56-58


HANDLE MATERIALs

Material Characteristics
Carbon Fiber This material is a woven composite of graphite fibers fused together with an epoxy resin. Providing ultra light weight and extreme tensile strength, it most often has a visible weave-like pattern. The weave pattern can be varied, as can the color of the epoxy used.

Delrin® This lightweight and durable polymer was engineered for excellent long-term wear characteristics. It can be molded to form, and is used in many industries.

G-10 G-10 is an epoxy filled woven "E" glass composite, reinforced with glass fibers for strength. Originally designed for circuit boards, it offers the knife industry a handle which is impervious to most elements like oils, water and acids. It can be made in many colors, and finished in a variety of ways, offering different amounts of texture matched to different end uses.

Kraton® This black thermoplastic elastomer offers superb flexibility and memory elasticity even under harsh conditions. Most often molded onto a harder sub-structure, Kraton® offers excellent grip and comfort.

Micarta Technically described as "fabric reinforced phenolic laminate", micarta is created by pouring a resin into a flat pan, then laying down a strip of linen or paper fabric, which gets saturated with the resin. This process is repeated until the desired thickness is achieved. It can be made in lots of colors, is lightweight and and can be finished in many ways including polishing to a high luster.

Noryl® GTX A modern, engineered plastic offering extreme durability. It is impervious to harsh environments and chemicals and is very strong. It offers no flexibility, but can be molded to any shape and in any color.
Phenolic This hard, ebony-colored compound is almost impervious to heat cold and shock, making it practically indestructible.

Valox® A reinforced resin with exceptional stiffness, Valox® offers strength and dimensional stability. It has outstanding chemical and flame resistance, and is molded to form.

Zytel® Zytel® is a material made up of fiberglass and nylon. The two are combined and heated to near 600°F and then injection molded to the desired form. Strong and lightweight, it offers excellent surface grip.
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Old 09-13-2019, 12:56 AM
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I did not know that Benchmade had a problem with the 2A...
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Old 09-13-2019, 01:57 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Gnepig View Post
I did not know that Benchmade had a problem with the 2A...
They don’t. They have to some politicians that where anti 2a because they supported a knife rights bill. I mean they are a knife company.
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Old 09-13-2019, 05:14 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Cliff Nieporte View Post
I'm going with the knife that I would most probably have in my pocket.
A SAK Farmer.
Certainly not the sturdiest knife in the world,not made with a "super steel" and just not very tactical looking.
But it will get most knife jobs done.

Sure a knife is important,but it isn't the MOST important or even the MOST useful thing you could have.

I'd pick a full nalgene and an AMK Heatsheet and a good light...THEN a knife.

That's just me though and I might die because I might have picked the wrong knife.
Come on Cliff! Don't you want to be remembered for dying with the coolest knife?

You are correct, as usual. The knife is just one piece on a list of essentials and not always the most important...this is just a sub-forum for knives so they get all the attention.

The SAK Farmer is excellent (I've always preferred the Electrician Plus). The late Ron Hood's favorite was the Rucksack model (predecessor to the Trekker models). This was the one knife he said was always on his person, along with a length of Firesteel.

While attire choices can limit EDC, you bring up a good point to have other essentials nearby, whether in your office, vehicle, small shoulder bag or day pack. While I do see a bladed tool as an essential, it's not always the most important or first item selected for all circumstances.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Gnepig View Post
I have found this useful:

KNIFE STEEL

Steel Type Characteristics- Approximate Rockwell Hardness
Knife steel types are for geeks like most of us, but actual users simply focus on how to sharpen a knife properly instead of worrying about how much carbon, chromium, or super alloys are in their blades. For an EDC, I don't really care as much, but for a dedicated woods blade, I'm a little more critical. What's important to always note (especially with folders) is that stainless isn't really stainless (unless you're looking at non-carbon/dendritic cobalt steels), knives will sharpen over time even if unused, and folding mechanisms will collect lint, dust, and rust if not maintained periodically.

Interestingly enough, we were in the Florida Keys back in July. My sister-in-law's son joined our vacation and he's a full up hippie. Good kid, just odd; but a damn good coconut tree climber! He was collecting dozens of coconuts and used my son's Emerson Rangemaster Sheepdog folder (ATS34), I gifted my son for Infantry Basic graduation, to open those dozens of coconuts. I cringed as I saw him hacking away on top of a tile floor. The knife survived despite the abuse, there were a few micro chips, but overall, they were easy to sharpen out. Definitely not the right tool for the job, but we had fresh coconut milk for mixed drinks and shaved coconut meat for munchies

Quote:
Originally Posted by Cuteandfuzzybunnies View Post
They don’t. They have to some politicians that where anti 2a because they supported a knife rights bill. I mean they are a knife company.
Actually, they just got caught in a social media picture with a an extremely bad optic of cutting up firearms from a local police department. Oregon politicians are not gun friendly, so that just compounds the negative optics. They have some serious ground to make up with many gun owners. Not to defend Benchmade, but several PDs use local machine shops to cut up evidence guns that aren't returned/claimed or are inoperable. I don't agree with local policies that destroy functional firearms, but to advertise your shop's assistance is simply stupid. I like Benchmade knives, they make great blades and I wont' be getting rid of the ones I have now, but I'm not looking too hard to pick up any new ones.

ROCK6
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Old 09-13-2019, 11:11 AM
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As much as I have a tendency to overthink specs and requirements of practically everything, I'm not super picky about my knife choices. I have a fairly diverse EDC rotation, and other than having narrowed it down to strictly tip-up carry options and having a strong preference for blade length above three inches, there are no particular requirements. However, outside of "normal office hours," my requirements are more specific:

Minimum 3.5" blade length
G10 or similar grips with steel liners
Two methods of ambidextrous blade deployment (flipper and thumb studs being most common)

In a perfect world, this would be a US-made folder with 4" blade and premium steel, but my favorite is a Chinese Kershaw RJI with 3.5" 8Cr13MoV steel blade. I love everything about it except the steel and the blade length, but it meets all of my needs. Now, depending on where I'm going, I also have a "weak side" backup which meets most or all of the above requirements, plus a Leatherman Wingman with a decent blade on it.

As others have mentioned, I always have one or two fixed blades with me if I'm going to be in the wilderness. I have a Camillus Barbarian (arguably a TOPS product) permanently assigned to hiking/backpacking duty, a Gerber LMF2 on a plate carrier for true SHTF use, plus "throwaway" fixed blades in my car's center console and my GHB.
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Old 09-13-2019, 06:06 PM
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Come on Cliff! Don't you want to be remembered for dying with the coolest knife?
I'm afraid someone else has that title locked up already.



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Old 09-13-2019, 06:46 PM
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I do wish I still had my Trekker.
I sold it and a bunch of others because I just had too much stuff.
It was a good knife,like the Farmer,that had a lot of utility.

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Old 09-13-2019, 09:43 PM
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Originally Posted by Cliff Nieporte;1977

[quote=Cuteandfuzzybunnies;19772088
They don’t. They have to some politicians that where anti 2a because they supported a knife rights bill. I mean they are a knife company.
Actually, they just got caught in a social media picture with a an extremely bad optic of cutting up firearms from a local police department. Oregon politicians are not gun friendly, so that just compounds the negative optics. They have some serious ground to make up with many gun owners. Not to defend Benchmade, but several PDs use local machine shops to cut up evidence guns that aren't returned/claimed or are inoperable. I don't agree with local policies that destroy functional firearms, but to advertise your shop's assistance is simply stupid. I like Benchmade knives, they make great blades and I wont' be getting rid of the ones I have now, but I'm not looking too hard to pick up any new ones.

ROCK6
Yes those where bad optics. I don’t own any of their knives currently. I’m considering getting one of their fixed blades, I just don’t like to many of their folders for the money they charge. Plus I prefer autos for edc.
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Old 09-14-2019, 09:59 AM
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First off the perfect survival knife is useless if you don't have it with you. Your survival knife is you EDC knife. I am not a super steel fan for survival knives because of they tend to take more specialized stones to sharpen in a reasonable time 1095 is my favorite knife steel and I am happy with the stainless steel that Victorinox and mora uses. I was taught a knife is a cutting/slicing tool not an axe or chisel or splitting wedge I have several Saks around and always have one in my pocket Walker is what I carry most of the time followed by a farmer or pioneer. For a fixed blade Mora Kansbol , 2000 or Eldris
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Tons of knives will do the job. An Ontario Rat I in Aus8, works just fine, one in D2 even better.

Simple, robust, sharp, decent length blade, no springs or safeties or other garbage to break.
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One of these 3 knives are my edc knife. Just depends on the day which one I'm carrying. But if I had to choose one I'd pick my buck. I've used it since I was a kid. It's the knife my grandfather and father always carried. Both the s&w are not the most solid of knives. They're not bad for carrying around the house knife. But I wouldn't trust my life with them if I had a choose.
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