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Old 09-03-2019, 07:06 AM
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US Army sleep system, extra bivy (or 9 mil garbage bags) to use as a sleep pad filled with debris, or an inflatable mattress, but I am not current with civilian versions of those. Pick and choose which components you want to take along, with a USGI poncho for a wind break.

Good military gear wins every time, it's TOUGH and proven.

If it's too heavy, do some extra reps to offset.

Problem solved, problem staying solved.
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Old 09-03-2019, 07:48 AM
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Originally Posted by DisgruntledPatriot View Post
US Army sleep system, extra bivy (or 9 mil garbage bags) to use as a sleep pad filled with debris, or an inflatable mattress, but I am not current with civilian versions of those. Pick and choose which components you want to take along, with a USGI poncho for a wind break.

Good military gear wins every time, it's TOUGH and proven.

If it's too heavy, do some extra reps to offset.

Problem solved, problem staying solved.


Not that the OP cares(he hasn’t responded since first post) but he did ask for lightweight. Those MSS bags are nice and stout but not what I’d call light or compact.
If I was looking for something that might last for years the MSS would fit the bill, I just wouldn’t want to carry it very far or often.
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Old 09-03-2019, 09:12 AM
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Originally Posted by DisgruntledPatriot View Post
US Army sleep system, extra bivy (or 9 mil garbage bags) to use as a sleep pad filled with debris, or an inflatable mattress, but I am not current with civilian versions of those. Pick and choose which components you want to take along, with a USGI poncho for a wind break.

Good military gear wins every time, it's TOUGH and proven.

If it's too heavy, do some extra reps to offset.

Problem solved, problem staying solved.
No, just no. That setup is 4x heavier and bulkier than a proper backpacking sleep system. My sleep system for most of my backpacking is a 20F Zpacks hybrid with a Thermarest Xtherm. The two come in at 2.29lbs, pack down small and keep me very warm down to 20F. These days you can go even lighter.

For contrast, your suggestion is around 10lbs, won't be as comfortable (isn't viable in many areas), and would take up an entire pack. MSS is great for car camping, I used mine over the weekend and it's my go to when not on the go.

People, please stop posting things like this. The OP specifically asked for lightweight suggestions; start a new thread (or resurrect one of the hundred or more on this forum) if you want to talk about your current setup and the reason you like it.
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Old 09-03-2019, 12:31 PM
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Just offering what I am familiar with.
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Old 09-03-2019, 08:23 PM
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Just offering what I am familiar with.
Totally understand, and sorry if it felt like a personal attack. There are soooo many ways to skin a cat, and that's what I love about this forum.
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Old 09-06-2019, 01:01 AM
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Western Mountaineering, How warm you wanna go $$$$$? Top Quality. I have the Alpine Lite for my John Muir Trail Hike. Its the widest bag they make as well. Made in USA http://www.westernmountaineering.com/about/
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Old 09-06-2019, 10:12 AM
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A good sleeping bag isn't the place to save money IMHO. Have a set of clean long johns, socks, gloves and a beanie hat that you only wear in the bag will help extend the bags range. A leak proof bottle that you can fill with hot water will help too.

I haven't looked at the new treated down stuff. My old polarguard ones still work fine but I could be tempted to lighten the load on my back.

A gore-tex bivy sack to put your bag inside.

Sweating inside a too warm bag sucks, I'd rather sleep cool.

Also factor in things like food intake might be less in hard times.
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Old 09-06-2019, 11:25 AM
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This forum always cracks me up. Guy asks for something lightweight, cost isn't a factor, and he gets replies from guys using arguably heavy (2-3x a lightweight solution), and certainly bulky solutions.

Plenty of cottage companies out there are making solid down quilts and sleeping bags. I've used zpacks and enlightened equipment, both great and recommended but these days I'd probably go EE between the two.

My 20F down bag is a legit, warm and comfy 20F down bag when paired with the proper pad(s) underneath. I typically use an xtherm (never had an issue with leaks) for colder months, and carry a cut down ~ 200g zrest pad for general use (it's one of my few luxury weight items) and sleeping pad backup duties.

For reference my bag (kind of a bag/quilt hybrid) is 19oz, isn't the lightest available these days by any means and packs down fairly small. My bag has water resistant material, but new bags have that in addition to treated down. Really, anyone using down should also be using a waterproof stuff sack; I use a zpacks cuben stuff sack and it's been great.

https://enlightenedequipment.com
Great response, but in my opinion the OP does not yet have enough experience to know what he wants. I dont know what he wants either.

If its not too much trouble, would you take time to sketch our a list of cost/weight sleeping system options.
Please highlight the better manufacturers (like EE & WM) in each category.
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Old 09-06-2019, 01:09 PM
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Some random observations about sleeping bags, weather, Murphy, and winter bivouac routine...

https://www.survivalistboards.com/sh...7&postcount=18

https://www.survivalistboards.com/sh...1&postcount=14

https://www.survivalistboards.com/sh...6&postcount=15

https://www.survivalistboards.com/sh...1&postcount=39

https://www.survivalistboards.com/sh...0&postcount=77


Some good reads re: sleeping bag fills, construction, and selection:

https://sectionhiker.com/fill-power-...on-goose-down/

https://www.gearx.com/blog/knowledge...-sleeping-bag/


Sleeping bags are one of those things where you generally get what you pay for. There's no free lunch... and the better bags (from quality manufacturers) cost more. The lightest/warmest quality winter sleeping bags start at around $500 and then move up to well over $1000 for the very best models.

Think of sleeping bags being offered in performance/pricing tiers:

Good: Firms like Coleman, Kelty, Slumberjack, etc. offer affordable basic models (mostly synthetic) for generally casual 3-season use. Their winter models tend to be too bulky/heavy for actual backpacking or ski touring. OK for car camping or base camp use.

Better: Firms like Marmot, Mountain Hardwear, Big Agnes, The North Face, REI, etc. straddle the scale with everything from economy backpacking models to pretty spendy winter expedition capable bags. Their premium bags are damn good. Their least expensive bags are merely adequate.

Best: Firms like Feathered Friends or Western Mountaineering are the highest tier... with price tags & performance to match. Even their least expensive bags will make the average wallet cry.
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Old 09-06-2019, 08:18 PM
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Originally Posted by charliemeyer007 View Post
A gore-tex bivy sack to put your bag inside.

Sweating inside a too warm bag sucks, I'd rather sleep cool.
I usually sleep hot, so mummy bags are my least preferred despite being efficient. I much prefer quilts that allow me more air circulation. In colder weather, I like the concept of the Wiggy's FTRSS or the Army's MSS. Both are a little too bulky for me, but allow for a wider range of temperatures. I can replicate this with a down bag and some type of poncho liner or lighter weight quilt.

I love my Gore-Tex bivvy, but they suck in humid weather (even if cold). I can only use mine about 2-3 months out of the year. Cold and humid just generates way too much condensation.

ROCK6
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Old 09-10-2019, 04:56 AM
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suddenly thought of this. do i need a sleeping bag to keep warm if i sleep in a hammock?
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Old 09-10-2019, 09:28 AM
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suddenly thought of this. do i need a sleeping bag to keep warm if i sleep in a hammock?
Most hammock sleepers use quits and there are quite a few companies out there that make hammock specific quilts. You'll need insulation under you so either a sleeping pad or an under-quilt.
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Old 09-15-2019, 01:56 AM
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Originally Posted by ROCK6 View Post
I usually sleep hot, so mummy bags are my least preferred despite being efficient. I much prefer quilts that allow me more air circulation. In colder weather, I like the concept of the Wiggy's FTRSS or the Army's MSS. Both are a little too bulky for me, but allow for a wider range of temperatures. I can replicate this with a down bag and some type of poncho liner or lighter weight quilt.

I love my Gore-Tex bivvy, but they suck in humid weather (even if cold). I can only use mine about 2-3 months out of the year. Cold and humid just generates way too much condensation.

ROCK6
Who ever solves the "condensation" problem is going to be a rich person.
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Old 09-15-2019, 07:10 AM
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suddenly thought of this. do i need a sleeping bag to keep warm if i sleep in a hammock?
I've found that if temps get below freezing, my hammock sleeping system becomes more bulky and heavier than my ground sleeping system. In cold weather hammocking, you need both an under-quilt and top-quilt. I love hammocks and use them about 8-9 months out of the year, but for cold weather camping, I go to ground to save weight and bulk.

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Who ever solves the "condensation" problem is going to be a rich person.
What's the sweat-box sleeping system some cold weather, ultralight hikers use? They basically use that condensation, but it's a risky system. Much of the issue is simply physics, but I agree, whoever can develop a waterproof bag that doesn't summer in high humidity will be rich.

This is one reason why I always pair a rain tarp with my bivvy bag. There are times the temps just aren't that cold, but the rain and humidity would still soak me, so can use the fly to allow more air flow vice sleeping inside the bivvy.

ROCK6
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