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Old 09-09-2019, 12:43 AM
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Default Type 2 diabetes likely genetic



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https://blogs.scientificamerican.com...abolize-sugar/

Some folks are pigs and still aren't diabetic even though they weigh 350lbs and are dying from heavy weight by other stresses.

Then some get it even with a reasonably healthy life style.

Now they have identified some of the genes involved and are working to create screening that can be done early in life to determine if a special lifestyle is necessary to avoid being diagnosed.

And with gene that can be identified as a sole link to a condition there is the future promise of gene therapy.
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Old 09-09-2019, 10:01 AM
RobertSWMissouri RobertSWMissouri is offline
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I was taught 30 years ago that type 2 diabetes was multi factorial:
1. Genetic: YES, if you don't have the genes you can't develop. As a general rule, native Americans have ALL the genes, those of us from Northern / Western Europe have at least half.....
2. BUT lifestyle was even more important: Two genetically identical twins raised in different environments was part of these studies. If you have ALL the genes, stay active, stay normal wt., and sugar is not a large part of the diet and is at the end of a good meal when it is, you have a 5% chance of developing DM. If have all the genes, and you stay overweight, don't get regular exercise (exercise has a direct effect of insulin resistance), and eats plenty of sugar, 95% chance of developing diabetes (so while genes and lifestyle account for almost all risk factors, there is still 5% unknown / something else).
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Old 09-09-2019, 10:16 AM
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My type2 diabetes manifestation is certainly genetic. I've never been overweight and have been very active and fit my entire life. My diet has always been very good; I'm not attracted to sweets or soda and have always had greens be a large part of what I eat. Standing in a diabetes line up, I'd be the last person to be picked.


Both parents had diabetes. My mom had it in her 30's and my dad developed it in his 70's. I always knew it was a ticking bomb waiting to go off. Two years ago it did. I'm treating it with a very low carb diet, ramping up the exercise even more and oral medication.

It no fun to no longer have bread or pasta at a meal or not to enjoy a cold beer.
But doing that sure beats the alternative.
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Old 09-10-2019, 12:24 AM
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Type 2 diabetes has a genetic propensity toward the condition. Some could not avoid becoming diabetic regardless of their efforts. However just like many of us that have a genetic propensity for alcoholism and addiction can avoid becoming one so can many with a genetic propensity for diabetes.

The difference is for diabetics sometimes the clock in their body just trips the switch with age. IMO

If I had a family history of diabetes I would make a data base and track data on diabetics in general and compare my diabetic family members to that. This might give you some insight to what you can expect for yourself and children.

Regardless untreated it is a terrible disease.

IMO no one knows their own body better than the individual. I hate it when others try to say contrary to what I know about myself so I would not pretend to tell diabetics what they should do.
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Old 09-10-2019, 03:14 AM
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My nephew was diagnosed at 12 (now 18) and as far as I know no one in my family has it except for him. Could be a fluke I suppose.
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Old 09-10-2019, 08:21 AM
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My nephew was diagnosed at 12 (now 18) and as far as I know no one in my family has it except for him. Could be a fluke I suppose.
I do not think it is always genetic. Was the boy overweight, poor diet and in-active? Sometimes things just do not go right from conception on and it is no one's fault genetically or behaviorally.

There have been great advances so hopefully he will not suffer the consequences much. Bias against diabetics will be a long time coming regardless; I fear.
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Old 09-10-2019, 08:38 AM
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My wife is borderline type 2 diabetic. In her case, it is clearly due to poor eating habits. I've told her for the last 30 years that this was going to happen. She ignored me.

Her preference has always been for the worst possible foods.

If I want green beans as a side dish, she wants a baked potato.

She cannot drink black coffee. It has to be loaded with sugar.

If I order a bowl of fruit for a dessert, she orders ice cream or creme pie.

She guzzled soda pop by the gallon most of her life.

She cannot stand anything that may be a healthier choice.

It's likely that some people have a genetic propensity to turn diabetic if they abuse themselves. Every type 2 diabetic I ever met had poor eating habits.

It's the same with people who are obese. Every obese person I've known can wolf down half a dozen donuts for breakfast and is alway slurping down soda pop (sugar-free soda is worse) or munching on a candy bar. Sure, some people gain weight easier than others, but that just means they are eating more than their body needs. I've never met an overweight person who eats less than the average person.
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Old 09-10-2019, 09:46 AM
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It's likely that some people have a genetic propensity to turn diabetic if they abuse themselves. Every type 2 diabetic I ever met had poor eating habits.

You'd be astonished as to how many diabetics are walking around who don't fit your profile.

Just because you've never met any doesn't mean we don't exist.
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Old 09-10-2019, 11:28 AM
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You'd be astonished as to how many diabetics are walking around who don't fit your profile.

Just because you've never met any doesn't mean we don't exist.
Do you mean the profile including genetics? It has been my observation once diabetes sets in weight fall off often before diagnosis. So your statement comes of no shock.

Even if one controls their diabetes their propensity for other illnesses seems to increase. It seems more diabetics die suddenly from other problems. That may not be an accurate judgement.
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Old 09-10-2019, 12:16 PM
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My Dad is type 2 but I am fine. I watch overall carbs.

My husband's mother and aunt were both diabetic, Mom was type 2, aunt was type 1. I remember the cousin drawing up the syringe full of insulin at every family gathering. His diet is horrible, but he has been fine. I just try to get enough protein in him every day.

I know a type 2 diabetic, blames agent orange even though his diet has been horrible since childhood. One time we ate out and I jokingly told the waitress to leave the pitcher of full-sugar cola for him, he drank the whole thing before we even got our food. And it's the chemical. I talked to him about low carb eating when I was on the bandwagon he went yeah yeah. Never tested his sugar "My fingers are sensitive".

Went in for routine testing and found out his average blood sugar was over 400. Went back on the metformin and started drinking sugar free beverages. Is doing some immoral things so I don't know what's going on now.

But if you have the trait, or have been exposed to something known to cause diabetes, you need to be smart.

My anti psychotic may cause diabetes one day but I am reasonable about sugar/carb intake.
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Old 09-10-2019, 12:20 PM
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Do you mean the profile including genetics? It has been my observation once diabetes sets in weight fall off often before diagnosis. So your statement comes of no shock.

Even if one controls their diabetes their propensity for other illnesses seems to increase. It seems more diabetics die suddenly from other problems. That may not be an accurate judgement.

No. I meant that the casual assumption that diabetics are all overweight and have little self control over diet and exercise is too narrow.

That weight loss in diabetics is often masked by the fact that many are greatly overweight, so dropping some pounds causes no alarm.

I also dropped weight, but in my case it was an alarm bell because I was at optimum weight to begin with. In fact, my unexplained weight loss was what caused me to get an examination which discovered the diabetes, which had been otherwise hidden.
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Old 09-10-2019, 02:33 PM
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No. I meant that the casual assumption that diabetics are all overweight and have little self control over diet and exercise is too narrow.

That weight loss in diabetics is often masked by the fact that many are greatly overweight, so dropping some pounds causes no alarm.

I also dropped weight, but in my case it was an alarm bell because I was at optimum weight to begin with. In fact, my unexplained weight loss was what caused me to get an examination which discovered the diabetes, which had been otherwise hidden.
I agree those assumptions are false more often than not. I think being over weight etc. might accelerate one's propensity into actually having diabetes. But people with diabetes may otherwise lead healthy lives.

I do not have any data but I have known diabetics that never fit the profile. There are many false positive notions in medicine. IMO
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Old 09-10-2019, 03:03 PM
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No. I meant that the casual assumption that diabetics are all overweight and have little self control over diet and exercise is too narrow.

That weight loss in diabetics is often masked by the fact that many are greatly overweight, so dropping some pounds causes no alarm.

I also dropped weight, but in my case it was an alarm bell because I was at optimum weight to begin with. In fact, my unexplained weight loss was what caused me to get an examination which discovered the diabetes, which had been otherwise hidden.
I've known quite a few that were H/W proportionate. It happens to black males a lot who are otherwise healthy initially.

That observation signifies something the article didn't or won't talk about. The change to a carb diet in man is what created the gene change. The carb diet happened after the exodus from Africa. So those who stayed in Africa didn't have the exposure like those who left. The early exposure were those races who had agrarian work lives. But African blacks have in just a few hundred years gone from low carb consumption lives in Africa to relatively sedentary carb consumptive lives here. In evolutionary time scales the African black is living in a carb crisis. Too much too fast and don't have the physical work load most dirt farmers had.

I wonder if political correctness played a role in them not mentioning that in the article? It's not like we can blame most blacks for living in the low physical labor lifestyle they have now. Their migration here to the West was rarely voluntary. While lots of physical labor would help their genes evolve society can hardly suggest they to go back to picking cotton. Interbreeding is likely their best shortcut out of this problem, but again that comes with a lot of negative social gravity. I could see a now politically and socially correct magazine like PopSci just tossing that portion of research out of the review article. Of course, genetics are just facts. Only an ignorant person would blame blacks for something like sickle cell as an example. We just need to encourage blacks to embrace a Paleo diet lifestyle.
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Old 09-10-2019, 05:02 PM
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One thing the liberals are doing with all the younger generation is shoving them into a vegan "lifestyle" which is very detrimental to their health. They need whole proteins, healthy fats, etc.

One could live a low to moderate carb lifestyle with a minimum of processed foods; from what I have been told it is IMPOSSIBLE for a working person to maintain a vegan/vegetarian lifestyle without extensive use of expensive and highly processed foods. "Vegan Sausage" WTF is that? But one driver swore it was yummy and "for her health". I couldn't help but think all the chemicals and the processing would ruin her health instead of saving it.

And they are ignorant. I just read someone on FB praising her fruit for lunch meal... how she is vegan now, and "no one needs what is found in milk so you don't have to substitute it". I think there are a lot of orthopedic surgeons who would disagree.

One vegan poster in the thread suggested kale, as an excellent sub for milk.
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Old 09-10-2019, 08:32 PM
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One thing the liberals are doing with all the younger generation is shoving them into a vegan "lifestyle" which is very detrimental to their health. They need whole proteins, healthy fats, etc.

One could live a low to moderate carb lifestyle with a minimum of processed foods; from what I have been told it is IMPOSSIBLE for a working person to maintain a vegan/vegetarian lifestyle without extensive use of expensive and highly processed foods. "Vegan Sausage" WTF is that? But one driver swore it was yummy and "for her health". I couldn't help but think all the chemicals and the processing would ruin her health instead of saving it.

And they are ignorant. I just read someone on FB praising her fruit for lunch meal... how she is vegan now, and "no one needs what is found in milk so you don't have to substitute it". I think there are a lot of orthopedic surgeons who would disagree.

One vegan poster in the thread suggested kale, as an excellent sub for milk.
No, the vegan lifestyle has too much grains and legumes for those at risk of Type2. Plus the specialty food is expensive.

Paleo would work better and with careful shopping perhaps not too much more expensive than the SAD.

Meats can still be cheap if you stick with what is locally plentiful. Same with produce. Learning seasonal trends like we used to can save buckets of money. In the hot south now you have okra, peppers, melons, and summer squashes going for cheap. In a couple months we have apples, berries, broccoli, etc. And there is always a sale on generic frozen veggies at some store or another these days. And American milk has always been a bargain.

People just need to learn how to grocery shop better if income is always a factor.
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Old 09-12-2019, 12:23 AM
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My nephew was diagnosed at 12 (now 18) and as far as I know no one in my family has it except for him. Could be a fluke I suppose.
That's probably Type 1 diabetes (aka Juvenile Diabetes). It's different than Type 2 diabetes, which is the more common kind that the article is talking about. The genes for it can be inherited, but they think something in the environment trigger the genes, like a virus, chemicals, meds, etc.

Btw, people with the "apple shape" body type (gain weight mostly in the belly) are more prone to getting Type 2 diabetes (and other Metabolic Syndrome issues like heart disease). Their bodies appear to be more sensitive to carbohydrates and being overweight than those with a "pear shape" (bottom heavy).
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Old 09-14-2019, 05:22 PM
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https://blogs.scientificamerican.com...abolize-sugar/

Some folks are pigs and still aren't diabetic even though they weigh 350lbs and are dying from heavy weight by other stresses.

Then some get it even with a reasonably healthy life style.

Now they have identified some of the genes involved and are working to create screening that can be done early in life to determine if a special lifestyle is necessary to avoid being diagnosed.

And with gene that can be identified as a sole link to a condition there is the future promise of gene therapy.
I love the science, but hate the realities.

One must give up their DNA to an entity which will be overseen by the government.

How many people's DNA queries will later lead to their own child or other family members being questioned in the future by the police because an ancestry.com or other DNA profile data base?

https://www.vice.com/en_us/article/9...ect-arrest-dna

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Golden State Killer Joseph DeAngelo was charged with 13 murders in August 2018 after a distant relative posted their DNA on a genealogy site, allowing police to track DeAngelo through his family tree.
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Old 09-15-2019, 03:12 AM
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I love the science, but hate the realities.

One must give up their DNA to an entity which will be overseen by the government.

How many people's DNA queries will later lead to their own child or other family members being questioned in the future by the police because an ancestry.com or other DNA profile data base?
It's my opinion that DNA profiles of those not convicted of a crime should be treated under HIPPA laws, regardless of if it goes to a health institution or not, because it remains medical information.

Without these regs it can turn even more sinister. If a gene is found that is thought to be a common trait in violent or criminal types then society could enact so-called pre-crime regulation. Plenty of violent or criminally minded folks still live with the lines of society because they trained from youth or use willpower to control urges. If I had grown up today the schools would have slapped me with an ADD or ADHD label. But dad's belt and stern advice to buckle down allowed me to grow beyond the urges by the time I was a young adult. Just like the pre-crime testing, kids today could get slapped with a label and be forced into therapy. If testing went as early as the womb? Oh boy! We can't discuss that topic here at SB but anyone can get the inference.

You and I might disagree about contagion, but I'm pretty sure we sit on the same page about the rest. Medical privacy should never be surrendered about anything confined to the body. The law shouldn't be able to exploit the fact that familial profile closeness lets the government put their microscope on a tiny family group without more classic evidence.

If there is one thing I resent the US Founders not doing is explicitly making privacy part of the Bill of Rights. Somehow France is better than we are at this. Until you get convicted of a crime there the state has to withhold everything personal about you from the public. Get a traffic ticket here and your name goes on the public record and your mailbox fills up with lawyer solicitations. And anyone who has ever read a EULA on games or software realizes they surrender all kinds of personal rights and privacy.

It's only when you put others at risk simply by merely existing that I can accept a breaking of the privacy line. Yes, old territory for us, but you have my commitment to the line at that point. There must be a presumption of innocence and privacy protections that aren't just inferred. As we've seen, simple inference isn't enough. After 9/11 if the protection wasn't in bold black and white on government paper then the government would quite happily bulldoze over the rest.
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Old 09-15-2019, 10:53 AM
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I am considered high risk by mental health professionals because I was suicidal, my brother murdered someone, and I was abused. As I went through my intake interview at county mental health all those years ago her eyes just kept bugging out.

"You definitely qualify".



Happily I am cheaply managed with a handful of medication.
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Old 09-16-2019, 07:52 AM
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My diabetes showed up at age 60. I have always had an up and down yoyo with my weight. I can diet and lose weight rapidly but I have to go to 800 cals or less to lose weight.

Since having been diagnosed 14 years ago, I have controlled my A1C through diet and metformin. I have lost about 30 pounds and kept it off, but have a theory about weight, assuming one eats sensibly.

I am currently consuming 1800 - 200 cals per day at my dietician's instructions. This is because you can't go full concentration camp diet when you're taking diabetes meds - your body won't stand for it. Having said this, even though I've lost weight, I haven't lost as much as I would like. I think this is because the body determines a "set point" weight it wants to maintain and unless you for dramatic changes in your intake/cals, that's where you're going to be. If you go below it, your body will fight you to get back to it. During the last 14 years, once stabilized at that set point, I have not deviated from that weight by more than 1-2 pounds.

As I've gotta older, my eating has changed significantly. I now have a small breakfast, regular lunch and yogurt or 1/2 a bagel for dinner - I'm dead on my set point even though in the past I've consumed significantly different and lesser meals. I'll admit to falling off the wagon occasionally, but 90-95% of the time I'm pretty rigorous about my carb/calorie intake.

Another thing I've noticed is that my A1C creeps up every 2 years or so, which I consider pretty normal. I was diagnosed at 7.6, went to 5.5 in the first year with diet and meds, and for the last 2-3 years have run 6.2-6.4.

I hope this can help someone - I have my wife and God to thank for helping me with this, and also for saving my life in many other ways - I've exhausted an army of Guardian Angels.

WW

shoot straight - stay safe
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