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Old 02-22-2020, 05:05 AM
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Originally Posted by Exarmyguy View Post
Duct tape the straps
Yeah, I had the same issue with the strap slipping some (only on one side). I tried rolling the excess up, but any large lump under arm gets annoying after mile 5 Just a little duct tape wrapped around both straps close to the buckle does the trick and isn't annoying.

So as to over packing Kit Bags...it can be done. The original ones that have three compartments (rear most designed for your handgun) can be overloaded. There is a balance when wearing a pack, but if you overload the Kit Bag, it can cause issues, mostly just screwing up your balance without a pack and stuff will stick out pretty far. It takes some discipline to not put an entire survival kit in there even though you probably could. Heck, I've even strapped a water bottle onto the side!



Now, for those that want a larger carry capacity and to have a more robust "Level-2" line of gear, but they still want it to work well with a backpack including the waist belt/suspension, check out the RIBZ Front Pack (more like a vest). It's not the best handgun platform and it's can trap a lot more heat than the Kit Bag, but the load capacity is enough that I could essential consider it a 24-72-hour survival loadout.

ROCK6
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Old 02-22-2020, 06:41 AM
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Now let me show you how a really cheap and totally ungear and fashion conscious dude does a chest rig.

I take a wide mouth tool bag put buckles on it to attach to backpack straps and sew some strips on I can thread molly bags through. The one zipper to open is nice and it opens wide so easy to manage and get to stuff. Keep first aid kit on the front of it and it is a light convenience if you just want to take it and leave the backpack for little jaunts.

https://www.lowes.com/pd/AWP-13-in-Z...-Bag/999977376
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Old 02-22-2020, 09:15 PM
Exarmyguy Exarmyguy is online now
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You can also stick one of those double slot webbing gates on each buckle strap . Metal or plastic but Ive found just using a bit of the duct tape is quicker.
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Old 02-24-2020, 12:39 PM
Solde36-82 Solde36-82 is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by leadcounsel View Post
I have the same one the OP has. It's an excellent product. My only gripe is that it losens up a bit and I have to repeatedly retighten the straps. If anyone has a solution to keep them in place better I'd love to hear suggestions.
Same as everyone else has said, the duct tape method works the best so far. I've tried various safety pins too, but didn't like continuously poking through the webbing. Still strong though!

Sometimes during runs it slips down to more of a belly rig!
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Old 02-25-2020, 04:40 PM
ddurrett896 ddurrett896 is offline
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I used a Blue Force Gear Ten Speed mag pouch for a knife that sits under the rig.
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Old 02-26-2020, 03:25 PM
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I was going to stay out of this thread because I use the same stuff I used when i was 17.

Mine is for recon not for standard load out.



Then I saw the word "duct tape" and had to chime in.

Nix the duct tape for electrical tape (what we used in the 70s, because duct tape was not around.

Velcro and duct tape are loud, even when you are moving at night.

Electrical tape can be taken off and used for lot so f things, like booby traps and band-aids, plus lots more.
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Old 02-27-2020, 03:01 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Trip Wire View Post
I was going to stay out of this thread because I use the same stuff I used when i was 17.

Mine is for recon not for standard load out.

Then I saw the word "duct tape" and had to chime in.

Nix the duct tape for electrical tape (what we used in the 70s, because duct tape was not around.

Velcro and duct tape are loud, even when you are moving at night.

Electrical tape can be taken off and used for lot so f things, like booby traps and band-aids, plus lots more.
The challenge here is with packs designed around using the hip belt for the pack weight to be distributed to the hips. My son went through Infantry Basic/AIT a few years ago, and they still do ruck marches without the waist belt. The stupidity hasn't changed in over 30+years.

Where that helped back in our days was when a patrol pack was worn with LBE/LCE kit, but the pack's waist belt was taped up and never used. After doing plenty of backpacking, my "patrolling/fighting" kit all changed to chest rigs, getting the equipment off my waist so I could use the proper suspension and load-bearding design of a pack. If I dumped the pack, I still had my fighting load with me, but more importantly, you could properly carry a lot of weight in a pack without killing your shoulders.

Ironically, for most missions where you just have a small patrol pack, several have gone to a "new" concept called the battle belt...essentially the same thing as the old LBE and once the belts got too heavy, I've seen added suspenders

For securing the running ends of webbing and to keep them from slipping, I've been using Gorilla brand 100mph/duct tape and it's held up to extreme temps and getting wet a lot. I did carry a role of electrical tape as well, but found the newer duct tapes much more effective.

ROCK6
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Old 02-28-2020, 11:38 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Trip Wire View Post
I was going to stay out of this thread because I use the same stuff I used when i was 17.

Mine is for recon not for standard load out.



Then I saw the word "duct tape" and had to chime in.

Nix the duct tape for electrical tape (what we used in the 70s, because duct tape was not around.

Velcro and duct tape are loud, even when you are moving at night.

Electrical tape can be taken off and used for lot so f things, like booby traps and band-aids, plus lots more.
I have never considered the noise of duct tape before. Thank you for the wisdom!
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Old 03-20-2020, 12:19 PM
Mike46370 Mike46370 is offline
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We used black electrical tape to secure LC-1 straps, etc., had tons of it since we worked on munitions and had it for emergency destruction purposes.
I've seen photos of LRRP's and others in Vietnam using green duct tape (cloth tape) on M16's to obscure the shape of the weapon.
I really dislike the hook and pile fastner (Velcro) closures on MOLLE pouches (the closures are fine).
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Old 03-20-2020, 01:51 PM
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I really hate Velcro for pouches.
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Old 03-20-2020, 03:57 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jack Swilling View Post
I like fanny-packs
Which are disfavored by most
Me too, and get mocked often so I just throw poo.
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Old 03-21-2020, 08:52 AM
sixtus sixtus is offline
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For duty and various missions, chest rigs and upper body can be useful. Soldiering moving to their use exclusively though is more an evolution and luxury of modern wars being policing of 3rd world dumps than real warfare these days.

We enter theaters and enjoy complete air, sea and usually ground superiority, we can drive soldiers to the battle, and also have uniterrupted supply chains from the factories back home to the combat stores in the field. Soldiers have been heavily encumbered, over equipped tortoises as a result, sporting and fighting a more upright SWAT operator look thanks to our mobile fighting style mostly based around dealing with small arms and IED insurgency tactics. We havent had to fight an equivalent enemy for decades.

Even armored troop vehicles, MRAPS etc are extremely tall , again because the major threat is not other fighting vehicles shooting at us from the horizon, but third worlders putting bombs under the road, where V-shaped hulls and high chassis improve crew survibaility.

I spent 25 years in a mix of military, paramilitary and international contracting in 7 countries. What I saw is if you have a force in the situation of not having air support, of hiding from hostile birds, or being cut off for days, or having actual artillery regiments against them( another thing we in the 1st world armies rarely have to deal with) or not having any supply chain existing at all, they will favour mobility a lot more highly. You see them start to dress more like 1980's guerillas . They particularly favour the ability to get a lot lower on the ground and crawl more easily with streamlined webbing, rather than too much excess crap across your chest.

I saw some security operators in afghanistan, Tier 1 Euro Embassy types with so much on their upper body they looked like overstuffed wine barrels. But its easier to get in and out of a B6 armored landcruiser with gear on your chest, not on the hips, so it gets the vote for running harmless admin tasks while telling all the girls back home you are jason bourne.

Not knocking chest rigs for tactical wear. They have definite advantages for various missions, duty uses etc, This is more to level the debate for the older style webbing above. its not as obsolete as folks think and from a survival point of view, in the worst SHTF, when you have the major army against you, not backing you up, I believe it would keep you alive longer.
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Old 03-22-2020, 07:22 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sixtus View Post
For duty and various missions, chest rigs and upper body can be useful. Soldiering moving to their use exclusively though is more an evolution and luxury of modern wars being policing of 3rd world dumps than real warfare these days.

We enter theaters and enjoy complete air, sea and usually ground superiority, we can drive soldiers to the battle, and also have uniterrupted supply chains from the factories back home to the combat stores in the field. Soldiers have been heavily encumbered, over equipped tortoises as a result, sporting and fighting a more upright SWAT operator look thanks to our mobile fighting style mostly based around dealing with small arms and IED insurgency tactics. We havent had to fight an equivalent enemy for decades.

Even armored troop vehicles, MRAPS etc are extremely tall , again because the major threat is not other fighting vehicles shooting at us from the horizon, but third worlders putting bombs under the road, where V-shaped hulls and high chassis improve crew survibaility.

I spent 25 years in a mix of military, paramilitary and international contracting in 7 countries. What I saw is if you have a force in the situation of not having air support, of hiding from hostile birds, or being cut off for days, or having actual artillery regiments against them( another thing we in the 1st world armies rarely have to deal with) or not having any supply chain existing at all, they will favour mobility a lot more highly. You see them start to dress more like 1980's guerillas . They particularly favour the ability to get a lot lower on the ground and crawl more easily with streamlined webbing, rather than too much excess crap across your chest.

I saw some security operators in afghanistan, Tier 1 Euro Embassy types with so much on their upper body they looked like overstuffed wine barrels. But its easier to get in and out of a B6 armored landcruiser with gear on your chest, not on the hips, so it gets the vote for running harmless admin tasks while telling all the girls back home you are jason bourne.[IMG class=inlineimg]https://www.survivalistboards.com/images/smilies/rolleyes.gif[/IMG]

Not knocking chest rigs for tactical wear. They have definite advantages for various missions, duty uses etc, This is more to level the debate for the older style webbing above. its not as obsolete as folks think and from a survival point of view, in the worst SHTF, when you have the major army against you, not backing you up, I believe it would keep you alive longer.
There's a lot of truth to all of that. My last (and yes, last) trip to A'stan, I noticed a shift to more battle belts. Most because of staying more slick on body armor when having to get in and out of transportation. Some even started sporting suspenders.

For training, I've gone to micro chest rigs, about the same size as my HPG Kit Bags, but a battle belt is more accessible when prone.
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Old 03-22-2020, 02:30 PM
Henrykjr Henrykjr is offline
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Glad I stumbled across this tread. I have been considering a similar system for my get home bag and since I have so many experts I know I'll get good advice.

In my vehicle I carry a two week supply of food and water plus preps. Because I am using a storage compartment under the rear deck of my SUV I am carrying a lot.

The issue for me really comes down to weight. 16-20 13 oz bottles of water, 4 2400 food ration bars, additional food and then the preps.

These are spread across the Marmot Gunnison soft pack 35 liters, a first aid sling pack, and the fanny pack that carries the emergency preps. All together these weight a lot. Close to 50 lbs.

Even though the weight of these items would be reduced quickly due to water consumption I am struggling to imagine walking 20 miles one day with 50 lbs, 20 miles the next with 42 lbs, 20 miles the next with 35 lbs etc etc.

The core weight of the non food/water items might be in the 16lb range.

So my thoughts were to try and load balance.....maybe a web belt or chest rig that would essentially allow me to drop the bigger pack as I went on.

The Gunnison is a soft pack and I do not have the space to carry an internal frame pack.

Can I get some good advice here as to what to do?

HK
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Old 03-22-2020, 08:22 PM
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i have a couple of different chest rigs but i always end up going back to the old Army LBE
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Old 03-22-2020, 09:24 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Henrykjr View Post

Can I get some good advice here as to what to do?

HK
A bicycle?

If i had to go 60 miles to get home and was in my suv, I'd carry a bicycle with me always.
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Old 03-22-2020, 09:30 PM
Exarmyguy Exarmyguy is online now
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The Hill People folks make a fanny pack for us dinosaurs too.
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Old 03-23-2020, 03:49 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Henrykjr View Post
Glad I stumbled across this tread. I have been considering a similar system for my get home bag and since I have so many experts I know I'll get good advice.

In my vehicle I carry a two week supply of food and water plus preps. Because I am using a storage compartment under the rear deck of my SUV I am carrying a lot.

The issue for me really comes down to weight. 16-20 13 oz bottles of water, 4 2400 food ration bars, additional food and then the preps.

These are spread across the Marmot Gunnison soft pack 35 liters, a first aid sling pack, and the fanny pack that carries the emergency preps. All together these weight a lot. Close to 50 lbs.

Even though the weight of these items would be reduced quickly due to water consumption I am struggling to imagine walking 20 miles one day with 50 lbs, 20 miles the next with 42 lbs, 20 miles the next with 35 lbs etc etc.

The core weight of the non food/water items might be in the 16lb range.

So my thoughts were to try and load balance.....maybe a web belt or chest rig that would essentially allow me to drop the bigger pack as I went on.

The Gunnison is a soft pack and I do not have the space to carry an internal frame pack.

Can I get some good advice here as to what to do?

HK
Well, Iíve always recommended that if plan to carry more than 15-20 pounds for longer distances, you really need a pack with frame suspension system with purpose-built hip belt to transfer the load properly. Your shoulders will be hurting after day one with a frameless pack like that and with that much weight.

If you donít/canít consider a pack with a frame, get a water filter and save your self a lot of water-weight. That also requires more water sources, so itís highly dependent on your area and seasonal water sources. While I often have a case or two of water all the time in my truck, I also have 2.5 gallon water can in my tool box (that gets rotated) so I can fill up empty hydration bladders if I have to do anything on foot.

Iíve known a few hunters who used the RIBZ front packs paired with a pack. I have a couple and they work; better in colder temps as they can trap heat as theyíre more ďvest-likeĒ. They can be overloaded if youíre not careful and can help distribute weight, but they also suspend from your shoulders and not on your hips (which again, is where the majority of your pack weight should be distributed to).

ROCK6
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Old 03-23-2020, 09:10 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bearfoot_25 View Post
i have a couple of different chest rigs but i always end up going back to the old Army LBE
Always have had this type of set up. Have the h-straps instead of the y straps. Couple of extra mag pouches and the butt bag also. It works.
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Old 03-23-2020, 10:08 AM
Exarmyguy Exarmyguy is online now
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They started going away from fanny packs because most infantry units seem to be mobile a lot more . The butt packs are a bit of a pain when your driving around inside vehicles. I still have mine from the 70's with the H straps.
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