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Old 08-04-2020, 07:28 AM
Tiha Tiha is online now
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Default Growing trees from pine cones



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Anyone done this?

I have some evergreen trees that are just big and beautiful and smell amazing. I have no idea what they are.

Am seeing pine cones grow on the branches. They are green yet.

Thinking I want to grab some this year and try to get the seeds, see if I can grow some new ones just for fun.

When do I pull the pine cones?

reading online they say when the color changes, or when they first fall, but when I am looking at them it looks like they are starting to open on the tree.

If that is the case, do I pull them now?

That is my concern, when do I pull the pine cones. Don't want to wait another year.
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Old 08-04-2020, 07:57 AM
swamppapa swamppapa is offline
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Depends on the species some conifers require a fire to open the cones this ensures the seeds fall in nutrient available soil.

Other just require high temperatures.
There's a conifers for just about every environment. Take a GOOD photo a cone and a small twig with intact bristle bundles to you county ag office and they'll tell you all about them
Or a nursery.
Just remember some confers are more desirable than others in specific areas

You can contact your state Forester go to their website and may be able to get seedling at a very nominal cost
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Old 08-04-2020, 01:28 PM
Fonz Fonz is offline
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Dont always need to use cone seeds. Around here, you can get long leaf or southern yelow pine saplings under the power lines, when they are still only about a foot tall. Dig them up with a plain round point shovel, taking some care with the tap root. I've transplanted about 50 with nearly 100% success rate, but if they are knee high or taller, its a lot harder to get the tree to survive the transplant.

The power company will periodically spray poison on the saplings and kill them off before they get much over a few ft high, so its better to just transplant them where they can grow away from the lines.
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Old 08-04-2020, 01:52 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Fonz View Post
Dont always need to use cone seeds. Around here, you can get long leaf or southern yelow pine saplings under the power lines, when they are still only about a foot tall. Dig them up with a plain round point shovel, taking some care with the tap root. I've transplanted about 50 with nearly 100% success rate, but if they are knee high or taller, its a lot harder to get the tree to survive the transplant.

The power company will periodically spray poison on the saplings and kill them off before they get much over a few ft high, so its better to just transplant them where they can grow away from the lines.
This is what I do too because I live close to an electrical easement and the power company comes through every couple of years cutting down everything. I have transplanted a few. They all survived the first year - my biggest problem is bucks shred them when they rub the velvet off their antlers. I've lost more baby spruces to deer than anything else.

Mark
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Old 08-04-2020, 08:03 PM
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Very hard to give good advice without knowing what tree it is.
As @swamppapa says, find out from someone local. Or post a pic here, someone might recognize it.

If the cones are opening now you could put a paper bag over them to catch the seeds. You might need to check every day until the seeds drop.
If it is too wet for paper use a sandbag or cloth bag. Check regularly to stop the seeds rotting. If damp, swap the bag for a dry one every other day or so.
Or cut some cones off every week and leave them to dry. See what happens.
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Old 08-04-2020, 10:24 PM
Aerindel Aerindel is offline
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Take a close up of the cones, and of a branch tip with needles and we can ID the tree for you and give more advice.

I get HUNDREDS of pine and fir tree starts in my yard every year that the mower takes care of.
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Old 08-05-2020, 03:48 AM
ajole ajole is offline
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As everyone said. Give us a picture, and seedlings or saplings are the usual route to success.

If you canít find them locally to dig, you may be able to get some from the Forest Service, if thatís a thing where you are, or just buy them through a nursery.
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Old 08-05-2020, 06:04 AM
wldwsel wldwsel is offline
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In Jawja, I'm kind of like Aerindle, I mowed over a hundred yesterday. I just pick a spot where I definitely DO NOT want pine trees and there will be fifty in a three foot area. Also, once they get about 10-12 inches tall, they grow up to several feet per year, depending on the weather.

Ya'll shoot straight and stay safe out there.

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WE ALL WANT TO BE FREE, BUT VERY FEW OF US WANT TO BE BRAVE. FOR ALL OF US TO BE FREE, A FEW MORE OF US, ESPECIALLY NOW, MUST BE BRAVE, AND THAT'S THE HISTORY OF AMERICA

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Old 08-08-2020, 11:28 PM
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All the pine species in the South will reproduce from cones. And yes, forestry programs harvest cones from Superior trees. In some cases with shotguns..

But if you want 10-20 pine seedlings, they are easily dug from ROWs, or if you want to assure the species, state forestry agencies sell them for 5-10 cents each
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Old 08-09-2020, 05:20 PM
Tiha Tiha is online now
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This is what I have.
Big soft needles, lighter green. Huge trees.

These are not normal or common where I live. But they seem to thrive ok.




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Old 08-11-2020, 01:32 PM
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I’m no botanist, but that looks like some flavor of white pine to me. Without seeing true cone it’s a little more difficult to tell.

But anyway, a method I’ve found that works for a lot of conifer (though definitely not all) is to put the cone (or nuts if you can get them out) into a ziploc and toss it in the freezer for 2+ weeks. Then you take them out, wrap it in a damp paper towel, put it back in the ziploc in the refrigerator. If it is going to sprout, it will send out a shoot within 10-14 days.

From there, you can dig a hole about 2-3 feet deep, fill the bottom with give or take 6 inches of gravel, then the rest with a mix of loamy, well drained soil. Plant the sapling up to the first branch, water enough to keep the root damp (but not soggy), and let it grow. As the soil compacts and the trees grow, you can add more topsoil just to keep the planting site from becoming a pit, but that’s optional.

Some trees like shade more than others, so you can experiment with a shade canopy for the first year or two. After that, if the tree is still there and surviving, the shade will not be necessary.

I’ve had luck using this method for Ponderosa pine, gray “digger” pine, red cedar and big larch. But again, there’s no guarantee that it will work for your tree.
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Old 08-11-2020, 05:33 PM
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in my childhood.
1. my grandfather and I collected pine cones in winter. I climbed a tree.
In winter, the cones are closed.
2. then we put them on the heating radiator. the cones came off and the seeds spilled out of them.
3. then we planted seeds in pots with soil and kept them on the windowsill for about 2 years.
4. then the seedlings were planted ..
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Old 08-11-2020, 06:02 PM
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are the individual needles flat or square in cross section?
how many needles coming out of the same bundle?
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Old 08-11-2020, 06:27 PM
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I remember that about 20 good seeds were obtained from one cone (other seeds were weak).
There were a lot of cones, as they were allowed to collect them indefinitely.
------
Further..
I would say that 10 seedlings 10 cm high grew out of 1000 seeds.
-----
Further..
from these 10 seedlings one pine grew.
We planted a pine tree in the 70s.
Ten years ago I saw on Google Maps that this pine tree has grown.

=====
In the 21st century,
- I brought spruce from the forest. The height is not more than 1 m. I brought 5 spruces, but only 1 spruce survived.
- scattered a lot of seeds over the site. Grew 3 spruce
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Old 08-13-2020, 09:39 AM
Tiha Tiha is online now
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Quote:
Originally Posted by maintenanceguy View Post
are the individual needles flat or square in cross section?
how many needles coming out of the same bundle?
great questions. I will have to find out.

I guess I could google it myself as well, just figured this was an easy one for someone to answer.


the cones are starting to change from green to brown. I am checking them every day. I think I will pull them as soon as I see them start to open.


This is just a fun project. This is not a common tree in my area so I can't go scavenge for them.
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Old 08-14-2020, 06:32 AM
Brettny Brettny is offline
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Tiha that looks like it could be a white pine. They grow very very fast. I have cut down a few huge 3.5ft across in my yard and there only 60yrs old.
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Old 08-14-2020, 09:51 AM
Tiha Tiha is online now
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yep, you guys nailed it, white pine.

Found these gathering and growing instructions. Pretty much what y'all already said.

They do open while on the tree, so I need to watch every day now. Floating in a bucket was interesting, didn't know that.

1
Gather white pine seeds in late summer after the long, curving cones dry out and the scales begin to lift. Place the cones in a paper bag. Set the bag in a warm, dry spot outdoors for one week, or until the cones drop their seeds.

2
Float the seeds in a bucket of water overnight to determine which are viable. Discard any seeds that float since their embryo is likely dead. Drain off the water and remove the seeds that sank.

3
Place the white pine seeds in a freezer bag filled with lightly moistened perlite. Store them in the refrigerator for two to three months. Remoisten the perlite whenever it feels mostly dry.


4
Prepare growing containers after the cold stratification period has ended. Fill 5-inch square pots with a mixture of half sharp sand and half milled sphagnum moss. Saturate the mixture with water and let it drain off.

5
Sow one white pine seed in each container. Poke a 3/4-inch-deep hole in the growing mixture. Set the seed inside horizontally and cover it with loose sphagnum moss. Spread a 1/8-inch-thick layer of sand over the sphagnum.

6
Place the growing containers outdoors in a greenhouse or inside a cold frame with insulated glass. Warm the pots with a propagation mat set to 70 F at night and 85 F during the day.

7
Probe the growing mixture every day to test the moisture level. Add water whenever it feels barely moist in the top inch. Water slowly until a small amount of moisture trickles from the bottom of the pot.

8
Watch for germination in two to six weeks. Leave the propagation mat in place but only turn it on at night. Set the temperature to 65 F. Continue to water whenever the growing mixture feels dry in the top inch.

9
Transplant the white pine seedlings into 5-inch square pots filled with half loam and half sharp sand once they grow to 2 inches in height. Grow them outdoors under 40-percent shade cloth with 1 inch of water per week for their first summer.

10
Transplant the white pines into a permanent bed in autumn. Space them 20 feet apart. Spread a 2-inch-thick layer of pine mulch around each seedling to shelter the roots. Provide supplemental water during dry weather.

Copied from homeguides
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Old 08-15-2020, 11:33 AM
Brettny Brettny is offline
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The only cones dripping from my trees are the ones that squirls chewed all the seeds off. It's like a buffet up there.
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Old 08-17-2020, 09:49 AM
Tiha Tiha is online now
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Step one started.

this weekend while checking on them I found a couple cones starting to open, in fact looks like one already dropped seeds.

I pulled about a dozen of them. Put them in a paper bag.

Kind of curious though, there is so much sap on these things will I be able to separate the seeds? Thinking I really need a hanging system so the seeds only drop in the bag.

Not sure, first try so we will see.

Hope to grab some more pine cones in the next couple weeks. Some of them were still green.
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Old 09-01-2020, 02:02 PM
Tiha Tiha is online now
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The pine cones opened up in a paper bag. They didn't drop all their seeds.

I tapped them on a piece of plywood to get them to fall out.

After which I separated the seed from the chaff? Or whatever you call it.

I had maybe 100 seeds when done. From about 10 pine cones.

I then soaked them in a large cup of water over night and yes only about half of them sank to the bottom.

Now they are in a open, plastic bag, in the fridge, mixed in with damp potting soil.

Now we wait.
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