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Old 09-28-2009, 09:41 AM
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Originally Posted by HaroldWayneHamlin View Post
Not to create an argument but

why would you want to grow watermelon or other high water requirement type of vegs in a survival situation.

Most of the high water needing plants (fruits) have almost no nutristional value.

Looks like to me, one would want to spend time and energy and resources on those plants that are high in food value.

While I am asking, in Guerilla gardening, what would be the top 5 plants that would do well.

later
wayne
Keep in mind Wayne... you live in Drought TX... not all of us live in a Drought Region.
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Old 09-28-2009, 09:54 AM
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Something that has worked well with us ,is to buy a lot of our produce from the Amish folks and then save seed for planting the next year.They are more expert on farming than most people and they grow what works for their area.Ask if what you get is heirloom ,as they grow some things hybrid tho.We have been air drying the seeds and storing them in mason jars in a root cellar and they work great.My 2 cents .
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Old 09-28-2009, 10:10 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by HaroldWayneHamlin View Post
Not to create an argument but

why would you want to grow watermelon or other high water requirement type of vegs in a survival situation.

Most of the high water needing plants (fruits) have almost no nutristional value.

Looks like to me, one would want to spend time and energy and resources on those plants that are high in food value.

While I am asking, in Guerilla gardening, what would be the top 5 plants that would do well.

later
wayne

Not a bad point. Valid for many for certian. But I second 123s thoughts. Where I am there is no danger whatsoever of runing out of water. Not that I would always plant everything I have either. I have probably 14 differnt types of melon seeds.

One does have to be selective about what they grow and I certianly am. But as far as low nutrition watery things i will say this. Your belly being full is only one factor to having some normalcy of life in the post SHTF world. Having simple pleasure every now and then, like some watermellon and salt.....i imagine will really improve my mood and my drive to cary on as well as the rest of my family.

But you have to seek out the value of such things for your self. ALso here watermelon doesent require much care to grow. A shovel full of manure on a hill side and just wait. I don think I watered mine once this year. at least not that I can remember.

But again there are other benfits to growing high water plants. Take the cabbage for instance. In normal land world of now, I grow my last cabbage in the winter and then till them back into the soil for compost. I make the sil richer. My watermellon rinds I pickle.

The cost t benefit ratio on many of these plants are on my side. Like I mentioned in previous posts some are not. Like Sweet Corn, Cotton, Spring Wheat etc.
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Old 09-28-2009, 10:11 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SurvivalDog56 View Post
Something that has worked well with us ,is to buy a lot of our produce from the Amish folks and then save seed for planting the next year.They are more expert on farming than most people and they grow what works for their area.Ask if what you get is heirloom ,as they grow some things hybrid tho.We have been air drying the seeds and storing them in mason jars in a root cellar and they work great.My 2 cents .
I wish I had some Amish arund here. All we have are menonites. lol
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Old 09-28-2009, 02:19 PM
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Originally Posted by Blaik View Post
Technically all heirlooms were hybrid at some point. It's just that this particular hybrid consistently puts out the same type of plant/fruit.
Thanks for making this very important point. It is easy to say, "avoid hybrid, purchase heirloom/open-pollinated". Perhaps for people just getting into survival gardening, a general rule like this is helpful. Personally, I've saved seed from advertised tomato hybrids (purchased from Park Seed) and they've grown just fine the next year, with consistency, production, and disease resistance.
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Old 09-28-2009, 10:35 PM
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Default Pests!

I put in a nice little garden this year just to save some money and try to broaden my skills.
Alas, it was part of a community garden, which by itself isn't a bad thing but if a gardener doesn't take good care of their garden you will reap the the rewards (bugs, weeds, disease, animal pests).

That being said, one thing I don't see in this discussion is pest control. Saving seeds is great but what about saving pesticides both organic and chemical?
I had a terrible time with cucumber beetles and if not for BTK I wouldn't have had a thing for all my work.

Also, with all the talk of how bad hybrids are there is something to be said for a few bags of pest resistant verities just in case some parts of the garden don't do well.

Also as the old adage says, 'don't store all your eggs in one basket.' I'd have several locations as well as smaller bundles for bugging out.

Lastly I used this book to ID several issues and find quick solutions to my problems this summer. I'd really recommend everyone pick it up.

The Organic Gardener's Handbook of Natural Insect... cover
The Organic Gardener's Handbook of Natural Insect...
Also for smaller gardens and natural pest control check out these books as well.

Carrots Love Tomatoes: Secrets of Companion... cover
Carrots Love Tomatoes: Secrets of Companion...
All New Square Foot Gardening cover
All New Square Foot Gardening
HikerDad
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Old 09-28-2009, 11:43 PM
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I've bought all my nonhybrid survival seeds sealed in #10 cans. opened and used one a few years ago, a little pricey but well worth it.
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Old 09-29-2009, 08:25 PM
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Half-pint mason jars, with O2/moisture absorbers and vacuum sealed, make excellent seed containers.

As for frivolous plants, while perhaps the first year after a disaster or collapse one would wish to focus on nutrition dense foods, also imagine the second year, and the indescribable taste of fresh watermelon, and what joy it would bring. In my mind, preparing for a post-collapse world is not only preserving life, but preserving humanity.
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Old 02-08-2010, 08:11 PM
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thanks, this was very useful. I read somewhere else that you should put some powdered milk in the bottom of the bag you are storing seeds in to absorb moisture--think that would work?
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Old 02-08-2010, 08:28 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by HaroldWayneHamlin View Post
Not to create an argument but
why would you want to grow watermelon or other high water requirement type of vegs in a survival situation.
I used to facilitate brainstorming sessions as part of my job.

One rule I insisted on is that no judgement/criticism is allowed during the brainstorming session.
The purpose of a brainstorm is to offer ideas, the discussion comes later.

I was always tickled to get a really dumb suggestion as it would usually cause others to think 'outside the box'
... I can tell you that occasionally the gold nugget is discovered as a result of hearing another's wild far out brainfart.

Let's try to stick to kev's wish to have a true brainstorm.

* * * * * *

My offering to this brainstorm:
I buy about $40,000 of commercial seed each year.
All of my dealers try to give me sweet corn seed every time I talk to them, they feel it is a goodwill gesture (kinda like giving a cap, jacket, calendar, etc.) They all have several varieties ... early, 'peaches-n-cream', super sweet, etc. ... and they come in bulk, they dole our packets from a 60lb sack.

I always turn them down, the corn we can, freeze, and eat comes from my brother-in-law's place, he grows a few acres each year and we can have as much as we want. When the corn is done (has been picked or is too ripe) he chops it for silage.

So, I could probably get six or eight pounds of seed for free this spring .... I just might have to start accepting it.
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Old 02-08-2010, 08:34 PM
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I started my northern orchard with a view on edible landscaping. Researching plants that come back year after year with minimal effort on my part. Fruiting trees/bushes, grapes, garlic, rhubarb & such.
The best plant forum I've found is www.gardenweb.org
Lot'sa native plants are still beneficial too. For those in southern climes who can benefit from them, I'd like to recommend soapberry & yaupon.
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Old 02-09-2010, 02:12 AM
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Glad to see BG mentioned -- this is where I've been thinking of buying seeds from this year. VictorySeeds.com was really good too, that's where we got heirlooms last year. They have a white radish (can't remember the name right now) that was just awesome, they were huge and so tasty.

A~


Quote:
Originally Posted by SurvivalMike View Post
also I advise several seed distributors.

www.bountifulgardens.com

seedmart Ebay store

http://www.heirloomacresseeds.com/


these are the only folks I do buissiness with aside from a few locals. They have been good to me. I compare my prices among the three to get the best deals possible. Alot more work than most are looking to do but well worth it in the end.
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Old 02-09-2010, 02:36 AM
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this will tell you just about everything about storeing seeds

http://www.savingourseed.org/pdf/See...geVer_1pt3.pdf

you really need to get the book,"seed to seed," it tells you how to harvest your seeds. not all seeds are just taken from the fruit some seeds there is a process you have to do inorder to get the seeds

i would not only store up seed that you eat but also ones you dont eat, those veggies can be used for trade

personelly i would stay away from the so called ,"bucket of seeds", some distributors try and sell. you can make up your own for alot less money
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Old 02-09-2010, 07:57 AM
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i buy all types of seeds. i also buy seed mixes.. for example, i bought over 100 varieties of heirloom tomatoes on ebay from tomatoseedlady. it's good to have variety!

i also buy various seed packages.. bought one from tomatoseedlady as well as kims-yesterdays-favorites (both are ebay sellers)... kim sells up to 75 different types of vegetables, herbs & fruits for 46.99. tomato seed lady sells 45,000 seeds for 60 bucks. i've not bought a survival package, yet, but i am considering it.

whenever i see seeds on sale somewhere, i always pick some up.

i stock up on edible flowers as well as "weird" plants, that most people wouldn't know if they were poisonous or not... like malabar spinach, new zealand spinach, land sea weed, molokhiya, etc. - most sheeple wouldn't know what plants were poisonous or not, especially if you get something that is not common to the area. the plants i mentioned are not commonplace in oklahoma, where i live.. lol

another thing would be to look for plants that are perennials and edible.. make some seed balls and toss them around your BOL.

how to make seed balls

i'm also interested in learning more about the fukuoka method of farming... not the hippy dippy "humans make no difference in the grand scheme of things" stuff, but i'm interested in the no tilling, no fertilizer, no herbicide, no pesticide and no farm tools and producing a lot of food on a little bit of land and etc.. not even any weeding. lol that's my kinda farming. all that stuff the guy didn't do, yet he had some of the highest numbers of grain production in his country & was known for growing some of the biggest and best oranges in his area. the guy also practiced a bit of guerrilla gardening by planting veggie seeds on hillsides and etc close to his house. so thumbs up on all those things.
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Old 02-09-2010, 08:19 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by XS29L View Post
It's the exact opposite. Seeds are dormant, they need air and moisture only to germinate.

Here's a laboratory test finding that moisture and oxygen greatly reduce the germination rate:
http://www.icrisat.org/Journal/volum...undnut/gn4.pdf
Thanks for this article/study! It seems to suggest vacuum sealing is even better when it comes to longer shelf life. I have been asking/wondering if vacuum sealing is ok for seeds. So thanks for this info! We are storing in different recommended conditions, freezer, cool dark space, vacuum sealing(havent tried this yet) etc.
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Old 02-20-2010, 01:50 PM
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Default my choice of seed.

Hello folks.

First off, I live in Canada and I am one of the legal growers of Cannabis. My choice for seed would be Hemp. Industrial Hemp as well as Cannabis for medicine seeds. A person can make so much from this one plant, it just makes logical sense to include it in a kit.
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Old 02-21-2010, 06:10 AM
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Originally Posted by michaelkaer View Post
Hello folks.

First off, I live in Canada and I am one of the legal growers of Cannabis. My choice for seed would be Hemp. Industrial Hemp as well as Cannabis for medicine seeds. A person can make so much from this one plant, it just makes logical sense to include it in a kit.
a couple of questions.

1. I have heard that hemp will grow as tall as some trees. I understand that in Hawaii, they have hemp that are trees. any truth in this.

2. Is there any difference in the hemp plant and the high drug content lesser plant.

If so is it possible for you to post a picture or pictures showing the difference.

I understand that the hemp plant is very low in the drug contain substance whereas the mary i jane plant is high.

I understand that the hemp plant is or was the target for industry to get govern to ban hemp because it is such a valueable plant that is not patenable.

It was too great of compentation for man made fibers.

later
wayne
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Old 02-21-2010, 06:38 AM
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Wow so much good information has been posted here. I wanted to thank everyone in a post because this is exactly the sort of thing i love to read. Lots of links to research and sites. Thanks Kev for starting the thread, thanks XS29L for that first research link, it was an excellent read, I am not listing all the names to thank as all the scrolling up and down would make me dizzy. This is one of the reasons i joined this forum. I was hoping i may have something new i could post to help out, but the more i read the more i realize that most people in here are better than me at gardening. Well at least i have a large back yard, almost 1/2 acre, and the willingness to turn most of it into a garden. Keep posting folks i'm really enjoying all the good info.
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Old 02-21-2010, 06:47 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by HaroldWayneHamlin View Post
a couple of questions.

1. I have heard that hemp will grow as tall as some trees. I understand that in Hawaii, they have hemp that are trees. any truth in this.

2. Is there any difference in the hemp plant and the high drug content lesser plant.

If so is it possible for you to post a picture or pictures showing the difference.

I understand that the hemp plant is very low in the drug contain substance whereas the mary i jane plant is high.

I understand that the hemp plant is or was the target for industry to get govern to ban hemp because it is such a valueable plant that is not patenable.

It was too great of compentation for man made fibers.

later
wayne
Hemp or industrial hemp is what you are referring to. If you look back in history most of the old wooden sailing ships used, hemp sails, hemp rope, and hemp oil on them. Many sailors made clothes from the hemp cloth. The THC content, the stuff in pot that makes you stoned, is so low as to be almost nonexistent in industrial hemp. You could smoke pounds of industrial hemp and you most likely would only get sick from smoke inhalation. The breed of the plants that get you high are very very carefully controlled and bred to that effect.

Industrial hemp and its seeds are still illegal in a lot of states though you can't do anything except use the plant in the making of the products i mention above. It also is a very hardy plant that will grow in almost any soil and can grow very tall, that is how it comes to be called "weed" i believe. It grows extremely fast you could harvest probably 2 full crops of industrial hemp in one growing season in michigan and more further south. Some states have ammended their laws to allow people to grow and process industrial hemp plants. If you want to do that make sure you check, and double check all the applicable state laws, and local ordinances. I've done a lot of reading on industrial hemp and think it could be a very viable crop for production and commodity trade right now. Once i have all the lists of laws for my area i will link them.
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Old 02-21-2010, 06:49 AM
innayat innayat is offline
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Mustard greens are really valuable to have around. They require little care, have high nutritional value, and will establish self-renewing colonies on their own. They will also stand through a mild winter and have greens ready to eat soon after snow melts.

Last edited by innayat; 02-21-2010 at 06:51 AM.. Reason: forgot the last part
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