Pellet Guns for Getting Food. - Page 3 - Survivalist Forum
Survivalist Forum

Advertise Here

Go Back   Survivalist Forum > >
Articles Classifieds Donations Gallery Groups Links Store Survival Files


Notices

Firearms General Discussion Rifles, pistols, shotguns, scopes, grips and everything in between.

Advertise Here
Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
How long until everyone finally dies from starvation, if...? Common-Sense Urban Survival 721 Yesterday 04:22 PM
BOL: carry guns back and forth or leave some? Levant Firearms General Discussion 59 07-16-2019 09:47 PM
Advice for first gun purchase abbysmom21299 Firearms General Discussion 86 06-04-2018 08:02 PM
starting from scratch--what CANNED food should I store? craezie Food and water 64 01-18-2017 06:41 PM
Dealing with beggars post collapse jsmith8881 Disaster Preparedness General Discussion 159 01-05-2017 11:46 AM

Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
Old 01-11-2017, 10:33 AM
DeepWoodsSurvivor94 DeepWoodsSurvivor94 is offline
Prepared
 
Join Date: Dec 2014
Posts: 357
Thanks: 49
Thanked 329 Times in 165 Posts
Default



Advertise Here

For my small game use, the Crosman 1377 pistol and the Benjamin 392 have held up well.

I went with the .22 caliber Benjamin for the slower speed, so quieter than .177. Multipump on each means no CO2 and seals to set and fail.

Each has aged well and with one pump in them durnig storage, many have had these for years with no problems.
Quick reply to this message
Old 01-11-2017, 11:04 AM
nomadshooter nomadshooter is offline
Junior Member
 
Join Date: May 2015
Location: Nomadic north America/USA.
Posts: 145
Thanks: 55
Thanked 86 Times in 39 Posts
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by DeepWoodsSurvivor94 View Post
For my small game use, the Crosman 1377 pistol and the Benjamin 392 have held up well.

I went with the .22 caliber Benjamin for the slower speed, so quieter than .177. Multipump on each means no CO2 and seals to set and fail.

Each has aged well and with one pump in them durnig storage, many have had these for years with no problems.
I agree on the use of a heavier slower pellet delivering as much energy to the target. That is why one of my .177 pellets of choice is the H&N Sniper Magnum weighing in at 15 grains, that is heavier than a standard weight .22 caliber pellet. There are other heavy .177 pellets, so you should be able to find one that does good in your .177 caliber air rifles.

Unfortunately the 1377 will always be a little on the loud side, primarily do to its short 10 inch barrel, not much space for the 1000PSI to 1400PSI air charge to expand before reaching the muzzle (yes the pressure has been measured a few times by a few people). Though using a 15 grain pellet will reduce the report even on the 1377.

Nothing wrong with .22 caliber either. I have a couple Crosman 2289G backpackers, a Crosman 140, and a few CO2 .22 caliber air rifles.

I definitely agree on using a pump pneumatic type air gun.

My good hunting air guns are all pump pneumatic. They have the advantage of being completely self contained, with no reliance on any thing external other than pellets, as well as having no notable recoil.

Though I do have an interest in PCP's, especially those that only take a 2000PSI charge so that an HPA hand pump can be used with them. I just have not yet got around to getting a PCP, though it is likely that the Benjamin Wildfire PCP will change that for me.
Quick reply to this message
Old 01-11-2017, 11:41 AM
nomadshooter nomadshooter is offline
Junior Member
 
Join Date: May 2015
Location: Nomadic north America/USA.
Posts: 145
Thanks: 55
Thanked 86 Times in 39 Posts
Default

On the issue of casting pellets:

First at least in my .177 caliber Air Rifles I have found the the heavier pre-made pellets tend to be more accurate. This observation influenced how I did my molds.

For molds I just have very simple pointed cylender type home made molds, with a slight flare at the rear. I have one mold setup to produce 14.5 grain .177 caliber pellets, and another mold setup to produce 18 grain .177 caliber pellets.

After molding I use a simple home made swagger to swag the skirt into the pellet. This works very well.

It took me about 20 (did not count) fails to get it correct. Making a mold to get what seemed to be good pellets was easy. The difficult part was getting these pellets of the correct body and skirt outer diameter to be accurate in my air rifles, as accuracy is important.

Though after getting the two working molds, I did experiment with making molds to produce different weights of pellets, and anything lighter than 12 grains was harder to get where the shots were accurate, anything over 24 grains was just to long.

I mention my experience so that it may possibly help others. If it helps great, if not thank you for reading.
Quick reply to this message
The Following 2 Users Say Thank You to nomadshooter For This Useful Post:
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
Old 01-11-2017, 01:59 PM
Colt's Avatar
Colt Colt is online now
Simple Goat Herder
 
Join Date: Aug 2011
Posts: 10,349
Thanks: 15,750
Thanked 27,820 Times in 7,464 Posts
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by nomadshooter View Post
Agreed on ammo, though I made my .22 molds as well.

If you do not mind my asking why do you think it is not ideal?

Do you think it is better to make the loud noise of using a firearm to hunt when everyone and there brother is running from the city looking for food and shelter? Seems to me using a firearm is a good way to draw attention to yourself.
22LR (especially subsonic) makes about the same noise. The farm is a valley with pastures on the slopes and a forest at the focal point in the middle and noise is usually well dampened by the environment. I routinely shoot my 22LR during the day with people sitting on the deck 50 to 100 yards away and they don't even notice. If they go inside the house I can use my 9mm pistol without anyone noticing it. Easier to hear at night, but I don't shoot at night that much. While my hunting environment plays some role, a 22LR sound isn't going to carry a significant distance even on a plain, and anything you're going to use a larger gun for isn't going to be a viable pump airgun target.

That being said, a 22LR will have a much flatter trajectory and greater impact on the target. The additional accuracy means a lot when you're targeting small, quick game.

Quote:
Or are you just a very good archer, if so nothing wrong with that.
I'm not, but I do have that option. I have relatives who are competition archers, though, and they do quite well. One even hunts with home-made stone tipped arrows. It's a good option. Not as good for small game as an air rifle though.

Quote:
In a situation like that it would make since to stick to small game, stuff that will reproduce faster than you and those of your area hunt it. When hunting small game the two considerations are that no mater what tool you use to hunt you will want to wait for the game to be pretty close, and you will want to do a minimal of damage to the hide and meet while leaving enough of the brain to tan the hide. For these reasons I see air rifles as very ideal for small game.
Predators are a good choice there. Killing the predators (but not wiping them out entirely) will produce more prey animals as well. Raccoons, possums, coyotes, etc, make for good targets. I've been bringing in a raccoon or possum every week on average for the past few months and haven't even touched the hordes of rabbits on the property this year, and I keep the deer herd that lives down by the creek with the berry bushes off-limits so they can build up and be a bountiful food source later when I really need them.

Close is less of an issue with a CCI stinger and a good scope. Within 1" of the reticle out to 100 yards. That's accurate enough to bring down a squirrel. You're only going to get close to that at about 25 yards with an air rifle.

As for damage, a 22LR makes the same hole size as a .22 pellet, but it has more reliable penetration, and especially at range. Regardless, a .22" hole punched out is an entirely insignificant amount of meat. But usually, the meat's still there, it's just punctured.

Quote:
Though we each have our own opinion.
But again.. it's a great tool for ensuring that you don't run out of ammo, and while not as good, it'll still get the job done most of the time. And we do have an air rifle that serves that purpose.
Quick reply to this message
The Following User Says Thank You to Colt For This Useful Post:
Old 01-11-2017, 02:17 PM
nomadshooter nomadshooter is offline
Junior Member
 
Join Date: May 2015
Location: Nomadic north America/USA.
Posts: 145
Thanks: 55
Thanked 86 Times in 39 Posts
Default

@Colt:
Good point on subsonic .22lr. Something I do not think about very much, as my only .22s are black powder and air. Though a .22 black powder rifle loaded with only miniball and cap is pretty quiet as well.

As to range, I was more of thinking about the conservation of energy. That is setup where you know they will pass, and take them at close range so that retrieving the prey is as low energy as possible.

It is true that learning the holdover and holdunder on air-rifles does take some work. Though I do have two .22 caliber air rifles that are able to deliver the needed accuracy and power out to 80 yards, in hands better than mine these same two could reach out past 100 yards, and still have more than enough power left over (19.5FPE at muzzle, with 18 grain pellets having a BC of 0.034 = 9.4FPE at 100 yards).

My hat is off to you. Here the quiet of air rifles makes a bigger difference. The muzzle blast of a .22 subsonic will echo for miles, while the quiet shot of my air rifles will not be heard for more than 20 yards. Different air rifles have different report levels, and the heavier the pellet the quieter the muzzle blast of an air rifle.
Quick reply to this message
The Following User Says Thank You to nomadshooter For This Useful Post:
Old 01-12-2017, 06:36 PM
nomadshooter nomadshooter is offline
Junior Member
 
Join Date: May 2015
Location: Nomadic north America/USA.
Posts: 145
Thanks: 55
Thanked 86 Times in 39 Posts
Default

I had the opportunity to do a bit of testing with the aid of a 10/22 belonging to a member of our group, and a couple sets of ears at various distances.

With my Crosman 2240 with shoulder stock, 12 inch barrel and debounced hammer, shooting 22 grain .22 caliber pellets, the report could be heard for about 30 yards. I included this air rifle in the test as it is the loudest of all my air rifles, by a large amount. Though it is quieter than a stock Crosman 2240 thanks to the longer barrel, hammer debouncer, and heavy pellets.

With my Crosman Legacy 1000 shooting 15 grain .177 caliber pellets the report could be heard for about 15 yards

With the 10/22 shooting 48 grain subsonics the report could be heard for more than 300 yards.

So at least the air guns that I use are definitely quieter than a 10/22 shooting heavy subsonics.
Quick reply to this message
The Following User Says Thank You to nomadshooter For This Useful Post:
Old 06-04-2017, 12:09 AM
Shadilay's Avatar
Shadilay Shadilay is offline
Kekistani Freedom Fighter
 
Join Date: May 2017
Location: Colorado Front Range
Age: 38
Posts: 175
Thanks: 5
Thanked 158 Times in 73 Posts
Default

with all the break barrel gas piston pellet rifles in .177 and .22 caliber that can get really good FPS on the market today and with out cheap the ammo is as well as how small it is allowing you to carry a massive quantity these are looking more and more like a great option for survival. Not to mention no need for any permits or background check in most areas just order it wait for it to arrive or go in store buy take home and enjoy. could also get a mold to cast your own pellets from recovered lead and any other sources of lead you can find.
Quick reply to this message
The Following User Says Thank You to Shadilay For This Useful Post:
Old 06-05-2017, 10:34 AM
Optimist Optimist is offline
Survivor
 
Join Date: May 2010
Posts: 13,309
Thanks: 41,752
Thanked 17,920 Times in 7,970 Posts
Default

You'll need pure lead for this chore, Shadilay. Alloy lead is harder, and will put wear on your rifling pretty quickly. I've been to this party previously, and had to replace a barrel because of it. Have also used tube teflon to sheath pressed pellets of alloy lead (you'll need a loading press and swaging dies to do this one....), and the softer plastic don't tear up barrels the way the hard alloy pellets do.
Quick reply to this message
Old 06-05-2017, 12:04 PM
Shadilay's Avatar
Shadilay Shadilay is offline
Kekistani Freedom Fighter
 
Join Date: May 2017
Location: Colorado Front Range
Age: 38
Posts: 175
Thanks: 5
Thanked 158 Times in 73 Posts
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Optimist View Post
You'll need pure lead for this chore, Shadilay. Alloy lead is harder, and will put wear on your rifling pretty quickly. I've been to this party previously, and had to replace a barrel because of it. Have also used tube teflon to sheath pressed pellets of alloy lead (you'll need a loading press and swaging dies to do this one....), and the softer plastic don't tear up barrels the way the hard alloy pellets do.
ya i am a gunsmithing student you could also coat them in plastic to protect the barrel. I plan to start swaging my own bullets in a few months the press is the hard part unless i stumble on a used one. There are lots of sources of pretty close to pure lead out there but you would have time to worry about it since the pellets are so small and so cheap atm you could stock up on like 20,000 and have them in your bug out bag lol.
Quick reply to this message
The Following User Says Thank You to Shadilay For This Useful Post:
Reply

Bookmarks

Tags
air gun, airgun, crosman, hunting, small game, stealth



Quick Reply
Message:
Options

Register Now

In order to be able to post messages on the Survivalist Forum forums, you must first register.
Please enter your desired user name, your email address and other required details in the form below.
User Name:
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.
Password:
Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.
Email Address:
Gender
Insurance
Please select your insurance company (Optional)

Log-in

Human Verification

In order to verify that you are a human and not a spam bot, please enter the answer into the following box below based on the instructions contained in the graphic.



Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 02:55 AM.


Powered by vBulletin®
Copyright ©2000 - 2019, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Search Engine Optimisation provided by DragonByte SEO (Lite) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2019 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.
vBulletin Security provided by vBSecurity v2.2.2 (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2019 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.
Copyright © Kevin Felts 2006 - 2015,
Green theme by http://www.themesbydesign.net