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I'm proposing a Patriot Watchdog Campaign on voting day Adam Robinson XV Political News and Discussion 23 10-20-2016 12:16 PM

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Old 10-24-2016, 01:39 PM
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Anyone ever try Survival food from My Patriot Supply? I have weeks supply and the only one I've tried was pretty good.

Input please! Thanks!!!
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Old 10-24-2016, 02:30 PM
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I don't know much about that company, but it looks like they're offering the usual entrees-in-a-can with whoever's brand name stuck on the label.

It really depends on what you are looking for. I store basic ingredients that make it possible to put all those meal choices and many others together quickly without all the additives used to preserve such canned premade meals. I regard them as processed-food TV dinners in a can with all the drawbacks of the frozen variety--poor ingredients and limited selection. OTOH, some people wouldn't think of eating anything but nuke-a-meals, and they want the same thing for food storage. So like I said, depends on you and what you want.

I would never store instant chocolate pudding. I store powdered milk, butter, cocoa, sugar, salt. And plain Ultra Gel for making no-cook instant puddings as well as cornstarch and tapioca for the cooked kind. So I can make my own instant chocolate pudding by the serving, or make up a jar or bag of mix for it in a couple of minutes. But I can also make vanilla, butterscotch, coffee, strawberry, banana, lemon, and on and on with the staples on the shelf. I don't need a can of each pudding I might want.

Same for the entrees. I store the staples including meats, fish, and vegetables, quick-cook grains and beans, pasta, powdered and concentrated broths, seasonings, etc. From those I can make hundreds of different dishes, all of them catering to my particular food preferences and my taste, not the one or two dozen generic meals a storage company packs in its ready-to-eat supply.

But I cook. And prefer to buy cheaper in bulk and mylar and O2 absorber the stuff. And maybe you don't. So we're back to the real question: What do you think of those for you? What are your food storage/emergency preparedness needs and goals?
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Old 10-24-2016, 02:47 PM
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I have bought plenty of it, but it is still under the house. I've never hit it. It sure pays to buy it when they have radio deals. Otherwise, it is a tad pricey.
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Old 10-24-2016, 04:01 PM
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It's pretty good stuff. When they do deals, they tend to be worthwhile.
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Old 10-24-2016, 04:07 PM
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I've never hit it.
Not the best idea not to at least test out what you are storing. My brother stuck cases of MREs under the house with the bullets and called it done. I finally convinced him to take some out and spend 2 weeks at least living on them. (Never in the military because he was busy helping Uncle Sam build better submarines, track their plutonium, etc. instead.)

Before the end of the 2 weeks, he decided maybe he needed to add some other stuff to his food storage and asked what I had.
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Old 10-25-2016, 06:47 PM
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Thought about pulling the trigger on one of the radio deals as that seems a decent price to have another mobile food option.
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Old 10-25-2016, 06:58 PM
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i think the company is owned by glen beck. ive looked at the commercials and it appears to be lots of soup and not much else. what else is in the container?

i only have about a month's worth of MRE's in the house. cracked open a mountainhouse lasagna just to taste it...had the runs for two days. i may break down the real MRE meals to save the crackers and peanut butter and pitch the rest. im not sure that it's worth having more than a month or so of that verses having real food in the house. for the last couple of weeks ive been trying different recipes of home made salad dressing....tonight it was russian. added a bit of sugar to the recipe and it was perfect.
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Old 10-25-2016, 10:59 PM
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it appears to be lots of soup and not much else. what else is in the container?
Whatever it is, it apparently only amounts to 800 calories a day in what they claim is a year's supply, so I hope people are adding things up for themselves and stocking much more if they really want a year of food.

This is my problem with all the 3-month, and 6-month and a year of fruits or vegetables or food offers. When I add up what's in there, it just does not compute.

If you take the recommended American diet for 1 adult male, if he's just moderately active, he needs 2400 calories a day, or 876,600 calories per year. (If he's going to be hauling water and hewing wood all day, then increase that by 50%.) Ideally, those calories should come in:

2 cups of fruit a day, 46 gallons of fresh, frozen, or canned
or 23 gallons dehydrated

3 cups of vegetables a day, 68-1/2 gallons fresh, frozen, or canned
or 34-1/2 gallons dehydrated
(which should include: 6-1/2 gallons dark green/3.25 dehydrated
19-1/2 gallons red and orange/9.75 dehydrated
6-1/2 gallons beans and peas/3.25 dehydrated
19-1/2 gallons starchy vegetables/9.75 dehydrated
16-1/2 gallons other varieties/8.25 dehydrated )

7 ounces of grain a day, 160 pounds
(This recommendation is based on only half whole grain, so nutritionally, 80 to 90 pounds of whole grains would be adequate if you make up the protein and calories from the other 80 pounds elsewhere. Most Americans would probably prefer to do that with meat.)

6 ounce-equivalents of protein, 137 pounds of meat or fish
(for best nutrition, you should include eggs, nuts, and beans here as well. If you want to substitute an ounce a day of nuts for essential fatty acids and other nutrients, that would be 23 pounds of nuts and 46 of the pound-equivalents of your 137 of protein, since 1/2 ounce of nuts is an ounce-equivalent of protein, as is 1 egg, or 3/4 ounce of dried beans (1/4 c cooked). If you wanted to get all your protein from beans, you would need 100 pounds of dried beans. If you want just 137 pounds of meat, meat, meat, then you really ought to make at least 15 to 20 pounds of it organ meat/offal--liver, various sausages with the "yucky stuff" ground into them, tongue, etc.)

3 cups of milk or equivalent dairy a day = 68-1/2 gallons of milk
= 54-1/4 pounds nonfat milk powder
= 68-1/2 pounds whole milk powder
(1-1/2 oz hard cheese, 1/3 c shredded cheese, 1/2 c ricotta, 2 c cottage cheese, 1 c milk pudding, and 1 c calcium-fortified soy milk are all cup equivalents)

6 t oils per day for essential fatty acids = 11-1/2 quarts as oil
(1 oz of nuts = 3 t oil, so if you eat an ounce of nuts a day, you only need 5-3/4 quarts of oil. 1 T mayo = 2-1/2 t, most salad dressing is 1 t oil per T, and you can count the oil (unsaturated fat) content of oily fish in here too.)
[Stictly for the information of our Canadian friends, since I would never suggest my fellow Americans do something as illegal as growing any form of agricultural hemp, the seeds/nuts of oil hemp varieties have large amounts of almost perfectly balanced omega 6 and omega 3 fatty acids. They won't get you high, but they will keep you healthy, and they taste very good. They grow almost anywhere in North America and have a much shorter time to harvest than nut trees. Such a darn shame we Americans can't stash a #10 can or two of viable seeds of an oil hemp variety in our preps, isn't it? ]

That diet will give you balanced nutrition with all the essentials, and you can then add sugar, sweets, and solid fats such as butter and lard to boost the calories to what you need, although it's best not to eat more than 3 T of added sugars a day, which would be 30 pounds of sugar per year.

If you follow a different diet plan, then find a table of how much of what per day you should eat on that diet and calculate as above to figure what you should have stored. If you don't drink milk, you need to replace its protein and calcium with something else. Many Native American groups did that with nixtamalized corn. Many orientals do it by making tofu with a calcium-containing coagulant. Other groups by eating small fish bones and all. If you bake a lot, you can change from sodium bicarbonate baking soda and baking powder to calcium and magnesium carbonate soda and powder. If you don't eat grain, ditto for all the nutrients it is high in and the calories and protein in it as well. If you are allergic to nuts or think they are too expensive, then you need to have another source of the minerals and essential fatty acids they add to a diet. (Remember that you need enough magnesium in your diet to balance your calcium intake--and whole grains and nuts are major sources. About 75% of Americans are mildly to severely deficient in magnesium because they don't eat enough of the foods that have it, plus produce has lost an average of 1/4 to 1/3 of its content of magnesium in the last half century of use of artificial fertilizers. That's a big reason why there's so much heart disease. And osteoporosis--calcium can't do your bones good without enough magnesium as well. And why they keep trying to make you switch to whole wheat and brown rice.)

If you think someone's packaged meals for a year will give you all the calories and nutrients you need, then go ahead. I've never seen a package deal that I felt had it all together. Remember that if you have children, they will suffer much worse effects than you from being shortchanged on nutrition for a year. Since you will really not know how much of what is in prepared meals in cans, about all you can do is demand full nutritional analyses and at least see if what you have adds up to your total calorie requirement, your total protein requirement (0.8 g/kg of your body weight per day or your weight in pounds x 0.36 = 60 g/day if you weigh 160 pounds or 65 g if you weigh 180 pounds, equal to 21,950 g per year or 23,742 g per year), your essential fatty acid requirement (from unsaturated fats = nuts, oils from nuts and seeds, oily fish, or some organ meats; solid fats don't count. Best to keep omega 6 to no more than 4 times omega 3. Most Americans are now eating 10 to 20 times as much omega 6 as omega 3, so even more heart disease--that's why all the recommendations for fish oil, eating fatty fish at least twice a week, etc.), and the RDA of all vitamins and minerals for the year or whatever time period your package is supposed to cover. If it checks all those boxes, then you are likely good as long as you will eat whatever it is.
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Old 10-26-2016, 07:54 AM
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It's kinda crazy...the more I learn and talk to people the more I see I need to think laterally. It's all about being more well rounded...
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Old 10-26-2016, 09:01 AM
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It's kinda crazy...the more I learn and talk to people the more I see I need to think laterally. It's all about being more well rounded...
Make it simple. Start with what you should eat per day on a standard American diet, Mediterranean diet, traditional Oriental diet, vegetarian diet, low-carb diet, or whatever diet you eat in order to get good, balanced nutrition. Lots of nutritionists have done the work of figuring that out for you, and you can find a recommended diet plan online these days for just about any way of eating.

Then multiply it out per year for you or you and all your family members by age and sex to find how many gallons or pounds of each food group you should have. Then think a little about what you like and don't like to eat that fulfills each food group in your diet plan. If you won't touch broccoli, then don't buy it to fulfill your dark green vegetable requirement. Do try to have as large a number of choices in each group as possible, though, because nutritional content varies somewhat across the group. If you eat a mix, you will be good. If you will only eat one thing on the list for a food category, you may not be. Variety will also keep you from developing food fatigue and eating less than you should. Once you have your totals of what you need, shop for the best prices you can find and start filling your pantry, checking what you have against what you should have. It's probably best to start with a month's supply and then try eating it--you'll find you were off on how much you would actually use of this or that. Then you can adjust your quantities before you stockpile to the rafters. If you live where there are seasons, make allowance for the fact you probably eat different things in summer and winter. So do a trial month in both seasons.

As an example of suiting your pantry to you, I'm not big on starchy vegetables, and I tend to come up short on red and orange, too, when tomatoes and red peppers aren't cheap. Solution was simple--I took a leaf from the Japanese breakfast yam porridge and a lot of African breakfast porridges incorporating starchy vegetables. A whole-grain steel-cut or rolled cereal mix tastes really good combined with pumpkin and/or sweet potato powder when cooked. Especially when you throw in some nut meal, too, and some ground dates and raisins for sweetening. These days, if I eat one red-orange/starchy veg a week beyond my breakfast porridge, I'm good. My taste buds are happy, and my body is happy. There are not a lot of #10 cans of starchy vegetables to see in my pantry because it only takes a coffee-scoop of dehydrated vegetable powder to equal a half-cup serving, but I've covered them my way.

Most Americans these days are just not used to thinking in terms of a pantry stocked for 6 months or a year. They shop by the week and can always stop at the store on the way home for what they ran out of. So it seems overwhelming at first. Do a little thinking and calculating, then take it slow. Pretty soon, you'll wonder why you ever thought this was hard.
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Old 10-26-2016, 09:03 AM
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You'd be hard pressed to find a commercially offered food package that contains an ideal mixture of food items. The reason is simple: Cost. A year's supply of grain and grain products isn't too expensive. Beans aren't too bad, either. Add in some sugars, milk and oil products, and you can survive on it for a fairly reasonable amount of money. It's not perfect, but it will keep you alive in an emergency, and that is the minimum goal of food storage.

Buying a year's supply of meat, fruit or vegetables gets expensive very quickly. Not too many families have the spare cash to stockpile a year's worth of a perfect diet in one shot. That's why most people build their stockpile up over time by getting a minimum amount to live on - which these kits can help with - then gradually adding more variety.

Personally, I find the kits expensive for what you get, but I do cook so I could make any of those items myself. It all depends on what a person's needs and skills are. They work better for some than others.
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Old 10-26-2016, 09:49 AM
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You'd be hard pressed to find a commercially offered food package that contains an ideal mixture of food items. The reason is simple: Cost. A year's supply of grain and grain products isn't too expensive. Beans aren't too bad, either. Add in some sugars, milk and oil products, and you can survive on it for a fairly reasonable amount of money. It's not perfect, but it will keep you alive in an emergency, and that is the minimum goal of food storage.
Actually, it can be perfect if that's the way you eat and you add a few things you left off your list. I eat a lot of beans and whole grain plus dairy, and not all that much meat. And I could go straight vegetarian with no sweat--I cooked that way for over a decade for a wanna-be-Hindu-holy man. I'd rather have some meat and fish, but I wouldn't have a problem without. I do like fruits and vegetables, though, and you do need to get what they give somehow.

Now, you can do that with corn and beans if you process the corn with lime and throw in enough of chili peppers and a little other veggie stuff. As a matter of fact, when the University-trained home economists in New Mexico set out to improve the terrible diet of all those Mexican-Americans, it was an absolute disaster. What they had been eating was a nourishing, well-balanced diet, no matter how limited it appeared. When they started buying milk and orange juice and all the stuff they were told they and their children should eat instead, they couldn't afford enough of all that often enough. And then the younger generation became convinced white-flour tortillas were upscale, and grandma's masa was embarrassing poverty food, and everyone should drink Coke or Pepsi. Whammo, rickets, scurvy, obesity, diabetes, heart attacks all over the place.

So, nothing wrong with mostly grains and legumes, but you better add a heck of a lot chili peppers or something else for the vitamins those don't cover. However, most Americans are very much not used to eating like dirt-poor Mexican Americans. So if you are going to set up all your storage that way, I do suggest trying to eat that diet for a couple of months to see how it's going to work for you. Maybe you'll end up liking a healthier diet. OTOH, you may decide that 6 months of nothing but beans and rice, and you'll feel like killing yourself, so no need to store more than that.

And yes, the food companies are plonking for the cheapest stuff they can make you think is a month or a year of food. You can buy what they offer in bulk, some mylar, O2 absorbers, and buckets and do that for a lot less yourself. Then you might have a few bucks left to buy chili peppers and onions or something so your teeth don't all fall out.
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Old 10-26-2016, 09:55 AM
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All great perspectives...
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Old 10-26-2016, 10:08 AM
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As for fitting anything but wheat, powdered milk, and honey into the budget--shop sales like a maniac and coupon like mad. Put every penny you save aside. As soon as you get a little ahead, buy a pressure canner and a book on canning. Scour Craig's list and garage sales and thrift shops for used canning jars in good shape. (For that matter, scour them for a second-hand All American canner--you might get lucky.)

Now you can buy a ton of those once-a-year meat specials and can the stuff (one super-sale Thanksgiving turkey for the table, another for the canner), more than you could ever stuff in your freezer, and it will still be good if/when the grid dies. You can go to a local farm or farmer's market or wholesale produce market in season and buy produce by the peck and the bushel and put it up even if you don't have a garden. What you save over the supermarket price will pay for your canning jars.

If you haven't got the money to buy it all packaged for you, use a little sweat instead. But try to get something more in storage than just X number of starch calories. If you have to live on it for more than a few weeks, it's going to make a critical difference.

You do have to build your storage gradually unless you're rich. My philosophy was better 2 weeks and then 1 month and then 3 months of a balanced diet than 2 years of one that I'd end up sick from if I had to eat just that for that long. And those small beginnings covered me for a lot of the natural disasters and temporary budgetary embarrassments that were more probable events than teotwawki. Now, after I got a month of everything on the shelf, I did make some bulk buys that were more than the timespan of a full diet I was currently building because it was cheaper that way. But not to the extent that I had no budget left to keep building up anything else. That was my approach. Obviously different folks, different strokes, and YMMV.

If you see a food company package that is a good deal for what is in it, then by all means buy it and supplement it. Just realize it needs supplementing--it almost certainly isn't a real year of food the way you will want and need it as it sits there.
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Old 10-26-2016, 10:22 AM
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As for fitting anything but wheat, powdered milk, and honey into the budget--shop sales like a maniac and coupon like mad. Put every penny you save aside. As soon as you get a little ahead, buy a pressure canner and a book on canning. Scour Craig's list and garage sales and thrift shops for used canning jars in good shape. (For that matter, scour them for a second-hand All American canner--you might get lucky.)

Now you can buy a ton of those once-a-year meat specials and can the stuff (one super-sale Thanksgiving turkey for the table, another for the canner), more than you could ever stuff in your freezer, and it will still be good if/when the grid dies. You can go to a local farm or farmer's market in season and buy produce by the peck and the bushel and put it up even if you don't have a garden. What you save over the supermarket price will pay for your canning jars.

If you haven't got the money to buy it all packaged for you, use a little sweat instead. But try to get something more in storage than just X number of starch calories. If you have to live on it for more than a few weeks, it's going to make a critical difference.

I've canned a little already but I don't have a pressure cooker yet. I work for a beef company so I have access to beef/pork/lamb at a reasonable pricing so I need to get busy!!!
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Old 10-26-2016, 10:43 AM
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I have accumulated a couple of months of those 3 day supply packages when the radio has deals. They are just salty soups for all intents and purposes. They taste good but i would definetely want to add more fresh items and more green food. Jmho
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Old 10-26-2016, 11:18 AM
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.I work for a beef company so I have access to beef/pork/lamb at a reasonable pricing so I need to get busy!!!
Boy, you sure do! Jump on it--you can easily get nice liver and tongue and heart and everything in the way of offal to can as well. You could even grab some sheep lung and make genuine, illegal-in-the-USA haggis, lol.
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Old 10-26-2016, 12:37 PM
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One more thing for anyone going the wheat, powdered milk, honey, oil, salt, and I can manage with nothing else if it comes to it route to cogitate on.

That list is the original one put forth by the LDS for long-term food storage because it was cheap, could be kept for years, long made the backbone of a European poor-peasant diet, and you could live a little while on nothing else if you made some of the wheat into sourdough-raised bread, sprouted some, and cultured some of the milk.

However, the LDS have long since backed off on recommending that as all-sufficient food storage for really hard times. Why? Because when that was first put forth, virtually all LDS still lived somewhere they had a garden and some chickens and hunted or near relatives who had a garden and some chickens (or more) and hunted. And with a big garden, a little bit of home-raised meat, and some occasional game, a lot of wheat and powdered milk and some honey and oil and salt will do it. A limited and somewhat boring diet, but no more so than that most of Europe's peasants lived on for centuries. But now a lot of LDS, like the rest of us, aren't in a position to supplement that small list of stores by gardening and hunting. And in that situation, you need to store a little bigger inventory of things to get by in good health. My Dutch and German ancestors lived on wheat and rye and whole milk and damn little else for generations. For the Scots is was barley and oats and milk. But it wasn't nothing else. Everyone in the Netherlands had a kale yard with kale and cabbage and turnips and onions and other cheap, easy-to-grow winter-over vegetables. Lots had chickens or even a pig. The Scots had lots of sheep and similar grown or foraged veggies. There were neeps long before the new world improved it to neeps and tatties. And everyone on the North Sea fished and ate fish, fish, and more cheap, frequently smoked and dried, fish.

So if you've got a garden and domesticated meat animals or a gun, or you live where you can forage for enough even in SHTF times because you'll have so little competition and have at least fishing line, snares, or maybe arrows, go for the 5-cheap-things-only food storage model. If not, I'd think long and hard before doing that. Add an egg or a bite of fish on Fridays, a chicken leg on holidays, wurst or haggis made from what no one else will eat from the butchering for Sundays, and brassicas out your ears, and it works. Without that....

Yes, sometimes our ancestors lived on nothing but a crust of an old cheese to dip into the stone soup and dry bread. And they died in droves then if a cold virus came through, and their few children that lived grew up to be 4-foot-nothng with bowed legs and often blind eyes. If that's your goal, all you need is wheat.
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Old 10-26-2016, 02:25 PM
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We have some of it... probably a 3-month supply. Wife was in charge of that purchase, I didn't have to pay for it, so I didn't complain. I really need to get some pallets of Mountain House beef stroganoff though. That stuff was actually pretty darn good.
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Old 10-26-2016, 03:15 PM
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Buying a year's supply of meat, fruit or vegetables gets expensive very quickly.
It certainly can get very expensive, and I did start much smaller than a year when I was building--1 month, and then 3 months, and then 6 over several yeas. I've been pecking away at food storage for ten years or so now, eating and rotating as I went, and I've got 18 months to 2 years of meat/fish, fruit, and vegetables now.

When I started to build up a big inventory of those items, I found some good deals off the beaten path. Plain canned pork cubes for $3.00 the 15-ounce can and lamb and beef for $4.00 and $4.25 two or three years back. I can my own now, and those are up to $3.29, $4.69, and $4.99 at the moment. They're still much better than WalMart's Keystone, though, those big cans are more than I"ll use up before they spoil if SHTF, and all the other standard brands of canned meat are more expensive. Canning your own is cheaper, but I only had a smaller pressure cooker, not a canner, and didn't want to cut corners with canning meat, so those did to start building a good meat stash.

Before that deal, I got a lot of 65% to 75% off stuff from a store that closed when the owner died and her kids sold off the inventory cheap later that year. It had only been on the shelves a few extra months while they were deciding what to do, so no big dent in its shelf life. I just opened one of the #10 cans of the case of freeze-dried ground beef last month. I think I paid around $11.25 a can for those with shipping. (They had a lot of them.) I figured the equivalent of less than $2.10 a pound for freeze-dried ground beef with a long shelf life was a good deal. Freeze-dried meat isn't my favorite, but cooked up with a little tallow and good beef stock, this is very tasty. It made a very nice lasagna.

There was another company I'd bought those snack packs of freeze-dried fruit from for my lunch bag when I worked at the hospital. They had sales and gave loyalty-point coupons. They suddenly added #10 cans of freeze-dried apples, pears, strawberries and bananas and freeze-dried corn, potatoes, broccoli, peas, and green beans to their offerings. Bought by the mix-and-match case on sale with loyalty-point coupon codes, I could get all those for $9.97 a #10 can two years back. And did. The quality was good, and the cans were filled chock-a-block full. They've reduced the inventory now--just pears for fruit and no green beans now, but they're still a good deal for freeze-dried produce if you have loyalty points. In you figured the added water weight of fresh produce and average weight loss in prep for each item, most of the items were comparable to supermarket prices for the same thing either fresh or plain frozen. I guess preppers either never found them, or didn't understand how to work a deal on the price, and the inventory didn't move well, so now they've cut back. A couple of the items they still have are still a decent deal, though. The bananas were the best freeze-dried deal I'd seen, because there was 19 ounces in that can, so it was equivalent to 7.3 pounds of fresh bananas at $1.37/pound. The supermarkets here will have them that high sometimes, although usually I pay about 0.70 a pound. For all sliced and no spoilage, though, I can live with $1.37. Too much of too many bunches has to end up as banana bread here because they go over the hill before I eat them all.

I think if people keep their eyes peeled for deals, they can find something here and there that fits their budget. With a canner, they definitely should be able to, but even with freeze-dried, with patience, it's possible.
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