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Old 03-30-2019, 10:03 PM
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Default Foraging Wildlife Food Plots - Video



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Does everyone know what a wildlife food plot is? If not, it is a food plot hunters plant to attract wildlife, especially deer.

Bags of wildlife food plot seeds are typically sold in the big box mart stores before hunting season. The bags typically contain stuff like turnips, beans, peas, chicory... etc.

While some hunters may just throw the seeds on the ground, others go all out. They may bring a tractor to the hunting lease, disk the ground up, fertilize, then take the time to actually plant the seeds.

Here on the farm my son took the time to work up a wildlife food plot next to a deer feeder. While the bag contained a few chicory seeds, a lot of the bag was made up of turnip seeds.

The good news, a lot of the plants in those wildlife food plot bags are edible by humans.



When the turnips are planted close together they may not form a large root ball as the plants are competing for nutrients and water. However, the whole plant of a turnip is edible.

Be sure to boil the plant before eating. You never know what walked through the area and brushed up against the leaves.

Several years ago there was a large spinach recall. Come to find out, wild pigs had made their way through the spinach fields. By brushing up against the spinach plants the pigs had contaminated the spinach with listeria. Doing a google search the outbreak may have been in 2006.

Next time you see a bag of wildlife food plot mix at the local China-Mart, take a few seconds to read the list of seeds in the bag. You may be surprised at how many are edible by humans.
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Old 03-31-2019, 04:20 PM
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Wow. Thanks Kev.

I knew about the plots. We had one when I was a kid on a property outside St. Louis, MO. But it was transplanted wild plants.

I did not know anyone was making a seed mix to do the same thing. Great find.

Just my opinion.
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Old 03-31-2019, 06:52 PM
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I used to do something like that at blm lands where I frequented the same areas over and over. Guerrilla gardening I called it. I did it to feed myself, but often caught rabbits and other small critters near the plots. No people ever touched the plants though. I am convinced that it was because they did recognize "food" in it's natural state.
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