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Now That I Live at my Bug Out Location Hick Industries Disaster Preparedness General Discussion 40 11-09-2017 01:51 PM

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Old 03-24-2020, 06:23 PM
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Potatoes are easy. At optimum levels, 1/6 acre can supply 4 people with enough calories for the year. I am confident in calories. Tomatoes, cucumber and squash are easy for me as well. Without actually researching the specifics, I would say most vitamins are covered. Beans are fairly easy but I havnt grown a ton but should cover protein. I would have to rely on wild black walnuts for fat and additional protein. If we include raising chickens (and gathering walnuts) as "gardening" I think i would suceed... If my back holds up.
Just for your edification, a 12 foot row of beans yields about a pint of dried beans. Read chapter 7 in Thoreau's book On Walden Pond about "The Bean Field".

I grow heirloom pole beans because I like the flavor but there is no way I could grow enough to survive on.
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Old 03-24-2020, 07:39 PM
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Originally Posted by NCalHippie View Post
Just for your edification, a 12 foot row of beans yields about a pint of dried beans. Read chapter 7 in Thoreau's book On Walden Pond about "The Bean Field".

I grow heirloom pole beans because I like the flavor but there is no way I could grow enough to survive on.
A family might eat 500 lbs of dry bean per yr. Thats a field 100ft x 100ft (1/4 ac) with 36" row spacing.
Pinto beans are no more difficult to grow that non RR soybeans. Used to grow several hundred acres of them.
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Old 03-24-2020, 08:42 PM
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I am increasing the amount of cool-weather crops this year. Trying to boost the amount of garden that I can grow without having to irrigate once the dry season arrives (May-Sept). I have a lot more garlic, onions, leeks, snap peas and potato plants than I usually grow.

I am trying true potato seed this year in addition to our standard seed potato planting. If the true potato seed plants produce well, it will be nice to be able to have a large amount of seed for our own use as well as sharing through the local community in the seed library.
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Old 03-24-2020, 09:23 PM
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Between my garden, nut/fruit trees, perennials and chickens I think I would still need to harvest a deer a month along with a fish from the creek every other day. I always keep enough gas on hand to till up a second garden to double my crops and always buy a years worth of extra seeds every four or five years as my “seed vault”. Self sustainability is a nice dream, though. To get there, I think I need a 4 or 5 acre pond that I can manage when the other bodies of water are overfished. I’ve been saving...
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Old 03-24-2020, 10:00 PM
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We got caught out in this regard. There is very little in our garden right now, and it's going to take months to get it back to full speed.

I'm not too worried because we're literally surrounded by actual farms. If we needed to we could buy or barter food from them directly (there was a robust farmers market every Sunday, but it's been cancelled for the duration). It would be better to be self-reliant, though.

I'd also like to increase the garden's capacity. Even though we have plenty of land, our useful gardening space is constrained by what we can protect from gophers. Anything we try to put directly into the ground, they eat, 100%. Two of our cats hunt gophers, but it doesn't make a dent in their population.

We built several raised garden beds with gopher wire lining their undersides, which works well enough, but for the new expansion I'd like to try a vertical technique. We successfully used water softener brine tanks with holes cut in their sides a couple of years ago, but they're empty now. I'll refill those and look to see if anyone's selling something similar we can cut up and fill with soil.
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Old 03-24-2020, 10:11 PM
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Quarantined? No space for a garden? Have windows that get plenty of sunshine?
(Black Thumb note: north facing windows will NOT produce any decent growth...)

KRATKY METHOD GARDENING
Fairly new process, published around 2010, utilizes a simple, unattended hydroponic growing technology for many vegetables. This process meshes well with in-home gardening, and can boost food production with minimal cost.
(*** excellent for leafy vegetables ***)

References:
https://www.ctahr.hawaii.edu/oc/freepubs/pdf/vc-1.pdf
https://www.tool-rank.com/tool-blog/...-201610071988/
= = = =
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Old 03-24-2020, 10:14 PM
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Originally Posted by ttkciar View Post
... I'm not too worried because we're literally surrounded by actual farms. If we needed to we could buy or barter food from them directly (there was a robust farmers market every Sunday, but it's been cancelled for the duration). It would be better to be self-reliant, though.
Excuse me. I have been a vendor in Farmer's Markets. Many / most of those guys are trying to shift over to the C.S.A. business model [Community Supported AG]. They will show you, today, exactly how many square-foot of each crop they are planting. If they are growing 20 different crop this year, their list will have them. Right now [mid-March] they are selling 'shares' to their CSA. If you buy a share now, then all summer long they will divide out the weekly harvest among all the share-holders, and deliver your 'share' each week to your home.

However advertises for the Farmer's Market will have the contact information for the Market Manager, contact him and he will know what CSAs are in your town.

Even if the Farmer's Market gets closed down this summer, all of those farmers will still need to move their produce. Joining a CSA in March guarantees you hundreds of pounds of fresh veggies all summer long.
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Old 03-25-2020, 11:49 AM
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Originally Posted by ForestBeekeeper View Post
Excuse me. I have been a vendor in Farmer's Markets. Many / most of those guys are trying to shift over to the C.S.A. business model [Community Supported AG]. They will show you, today, exactly how many square-foot of each crop they are planting. If they are growing 20 different crop this year, their list will have them. Right now [mid-March] they are selling 'shares' to their CSA. If you buy a share now, then all summer long they will divide out the weekly harvest among all the share-holders, and deliver your 'share' each week to your home.

However advertises for the Farmer's Market will have the contact information for the Market Manager, contact him and he will know what CSAs are in your town.

Even if the Farmer's Market gets closed down this summer, all of those farmers will still need to move their produce. Joining a CSA in March guarantees you hundreds of pounds of fresh veggies all summer long.
The CSA is a very good option considering the potential shortages and escalating prices that are likely around the corner. Joining one for meat is what has crossed my mind. This could be an opportune time for CSA folks.
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Old 03-25-2020, 02:07 PM
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Originally Posted by Hick Industries View Post
A family might eat 500 lbs of dry bean per yr. Thats a field 100ft x 100ft (1/4 ac) with 36" row spacing.
Pinto beans are no more difficult to grow that non RR soybeans. Used to grow several hundred acres of them.
We don't have the room to grow enough beans for our personal use, did my own test crops and did the math.
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Old 03-25-2020, 07:51 PM
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most of my winter squash went to sheep food this winter. It is not a question of growing but eating. We moved here 9 years ago. I grew a massive garden. We gave away a lot. the freezer had corn for 3 years. this year I"m doing the big garden again. We still have blackeyes and frozen squash from last year. Reality 101 if you can not make it to the store, the garden will provide. We are looking at a giant garden, the chickens will be ready in 4 months and we can milk goats. A couple of wild boar and maybe some wild turkeys and we will be fine. I really don't like wild boar but hey...
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Old 03-25-2020, 08:30 PM
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There is zero chance I could live on my garden. I always have to give away quite a bit of tomatoes and cucumbers however, living on them would be misery. By the end of the growing season I'm actually happy it's done. But not as happy as when it's time to get planting. It's a catch-22 I tell ya.
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Old 03-27-2020, 01:32 PM
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I have seedlings going, and decided to do some direct sowing of cool crops too. As I mentioned earlier, I have a carrot bed that was covered with a foot of leaves and a tarp to try and get them to produce seed this year. Similar approaches have failed previously. To my delight, in a separate uncovered bed, where I was sowing kale, I discovered a perfect carrot had survived the winter without any intentional covering. Hoping that bodes well for those under my the tarp. Who knows?... maybe commercial heirloom seeds will be $40 a packet this time next year. This crisis and the likely economic collapse is precisely why I have been endorsing a survival gardening approach as removed as possible from dependence on commercially purchased products.
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Old 03-27-2020, 06:39 PM
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Interesting. I’ve gardened for over 40 yrs, No way in Hades would my wife and kids eat beans even in hard times, let alone anything else in the garden. I love veggies. They don’t. Just throwing that out there.
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Old 03-27-2020, 08:04 PM
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Default Pretty good shape but

I cheat a lot. I own a garden center so I have a years supply plus of fertilizer and chemicals (organic and not) on hand at home at any given time. One greenhouse at home with plastic for ten years. I’m debating whether to fill the dedicated propane tank for the greenhouse. The only seeds I sell at my shop are heirlooms from Baker Creek. I do always plant some hybrids just to try new varieties.
The chicken coop is moderately full and I just purchased an incubator.
As soon as our douchebag of a governor notified us of a shutdown I grabbed three genetically unrelated pairs of rabbits for additional protein. I have decent hunting fishing and foraging ground very close.

As an aside, I grow and sell lots of tomato plants every year. When you are calculating growing your own please keep in mind that those cute little tomatoe plants you buy from me or whomever are probably around eight weeks old at the time of purchase. If you plant tomato seeds in the ground after frost is over you may have a drastically shortened growing season and harvest because of this late start. My suggestion would be to plan for some way to start plants earlier in the house.
Good luck my fellow preppers. I believe we are in for a tough few years.
Stay safe
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Old 03-27-2020, 08:09 PM
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Jet, Thanks for the post. I may have to try that with lettuce inside. I could sprout it in the sunroom then move it to the kitchen. One thing yall have to consider is this.... growing 1/2 an acre of pinto beans may supply your yearly food intake but picking said pinto bean and advertising that your growing beans... yikes. Thats why I stocked up on beans "they last 30+ years". I find growing sweet potatoes, fruit trees and bushes, and select small quantities of vegtables works better for me. Kind of like having 50 chickens... and having to feed said chickens or having 5-10 concealed birds that produce offspring you sell or eat.
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Old 03-27-2020, 08:18 PM
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Beans are great... especially with rice, fresh vegtables, sausuage, red beans and rice, it makes meals go much further. Not everybody has the same growing habitat. I have two 40 start biodomes and they are everybit as efficient as a greenhouse having built and owned several. https://parkseed.com/parks-original-...cells/p/v1801/
Don't buy the refills, just use peat and or composted manure. I find 80 is the magic # for me. I can start seeds and plant out every two weeks. I then take some and move to cups to offset planting dates, kind of like setting seeds out at different times. Saving seeds means I always have heirlooms. I probably give away 10k seeds a year so everybody I know "no neighbors except one..." that's cool has seeds. I don't think you want to advertise with neighbors in today's world even if they are nice. I have some tomatoes I am going to keep at 1 foot for the fall right now to plant in August.
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Old 03-27-2020, 10:14 PM
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Most of our beans go into flour.

Our land is not well suited to growing wheat, so we shifted our wheat flour consumption to bean-flour.
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Old 03-28-2020, 10:59 AM
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Just a thought, the chicks that I bought in February will not be laying until September. the chicks and ducks that I hatched last week will not be butcher ready until July or August, no eggs from the hens until Sept or Oct. My spring garden is waiting until spring to begin growing. maybe June? Summer garden will not be planted until May. Right now we are eating veggies from the freezer and canned fruit. We are looking to live out of the freezer and pantry but that was last years garden. Most of living off your garden is staying alive until it produces.
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Old 03-29-2020, 08:14 AM
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It’s also about preserving the produce of one season to provide until the following season produces.
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Old 03-29-2020, 05:39 PM
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How prepared are we really to live off our gardening skills alone? Unless this virus thing clears up soon I guess we're about to find out. We've gone into full lock down on our homestead and are intending to keep it that way for the duration of this event.

We raised produce for a living for 10 years selling at farmers markets, but we retired that business 2 winters ago and sowed some of our fields in grass. We still have 5 greenhouses and most of the infrastructure in place to grow stuff and as soon as we saw the direction that this was going in we tilled those fields back up for crops. We're still laying out exactly how much of what we want to plant for this year.

We had khaki campbell ducks and a few chickens and we bought a few more layers. We have also purchased a milk cow which has turned out to be a really good thing so far. I think we got a good one, she's so gentle and gives great milk. We stockpiled feed for the birds and the cow to hopefully get us to harvest this fall.

We've grown tons of vegetables for years but we will be changing what and how much we grow because of course it's different for markets vs survival gardening. We haven't grown grain here before but this year we are going to grow quite a bit of field corn, milo, oats (part to bale and part to harvest for grain), dry beans and then winter wheat this fall. We have a tractor and planter but we have no combine so all harvest will have to be done by hand...we'll see how that goes.

I think meat will be a little bit in short supply. We have a lot of fish and then wild game. We have considered getting some animals to feed up but then we would have to stock more feed for them...I think we likely will go with what we have. We do have a lot of meat in the freezers so we'll be good for quite a while. We will have eggs, milk/cheese so that will help with protein needs.

We'll be documenting everything and putting it on our YouTube channel and hopefully after this is all over we can go watch all of them and see what we did right and wrong. Wish us luck!

Last edited by Homesteader123; 03-29-2020 at 05:40 PM.. Reason: spelling error
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