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Old 06-01-2020, 07:13 PM
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I am going on an 1000 mile trip, I packed my get home bag with everything I thought I would need to get home, I figured it would probably take me 2 months to get home at 20 miles a day. Going over everything in the pack I tried to carry just what I would need, about 1 weeks worth of food, 2- 48 oz bottles of water, two changes of underwear, socks and t shirts. Full size self protection with two extra mags and a small back up with 1 extra mag, light weight cooking stove and fuel tabs, 1 first aid kit and 1 trauma kit, med and hygiene kit, Knife, Spork, light weight small sleeping bag, a rain poncho, compass, fire starting kit, small led flashlight, a high quality Monocular, a compact katadyne water filter and a life straw as back up. Small titanium pot with lid. titanium spork, Paper and pen, deck of cards and a harmonica, The issue is I am at 38lbs and I can't really think of anything I don't need in the pack, especially if I was on the road for two months. I will be eating the food and drinking water which will reduce the weight, though I will be refilling the water bottles, I'm carrying two 48 oz water bottles as I will be trekking thru the desert on the last 200 miles. So what do you think? is a 38lb pack doable, should I get rid of any weight or should I add anything additional for the trip? I see that most backpackers try to keep there bags under 30 lbs.
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Old 06-01-2020, 07:16 PM
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Looks good.

Remember: you can always dump gear.

If you can I would stick an extra box of food and water in your vehicle.
Lightweight tarp too. You need shade in the desert
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Old 06-01-2020, 07:21 PM
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In the truck, I have an extra 3 gallons of water, 2 cases of MRE's, a tarp and a wool blanket along with the typical, jumper cables, tools and road flares.
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Old 06-01-2020, 07:30 PM
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With 3 full size mags and 2 compact mags I have a total of 51 rounds, is that enough? problem is that ammo weighs a lot! I would be more about escape and avoidance than shooting it out with people!
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Old 06-01-2020, 08:01 PM
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Bring a large amount of cash. If you have to use your pack and bail from your ride go buy a bike and strap the pack to it. Go from 20 miles a day to 50. Plus the weight will not be a big factor. Might only want to bring 10 round mags if you are driving through anti gun states.
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Old 06-01-2020, 08:07 PM
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Ammo and water.

Never enough.
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Old 06-01-2020, 08:26 PM
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Sustaining 20 miles a day is very optimistic especially in a world where you're not the only one walking home. Some immediate things to think about is how comfortable the pack is, how much you have hiked with a similar weight, shoes, and fitness level. You may want to add maps and a compass.
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Old 06-01-2020, 08:29 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by beaner View Post
Sustaining 20 miles a day is very optimistic especially in a world where you're not the only one walking home. Some immediate things to think about is how comfortable the pack is, how much you have hiked with a similar weight, shoes, and fitness level. You may want to add maps and a compass.
There is no may want to. Every GHB, BOB, INCH bag or whatever you call it should have one. And know how to use both of them.

*Edit* I see that the OP does mention a compass.
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Old 06-01-2020, 08:34 PM
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You're right, I missed reading a compass. Good càtch
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Old 06-01-2020, 09:17 PM
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if you had a old points motor moped in your trunk, and a gas can or 2. drain your auto tank into the gas can, and at 100 miles per gallon, you'd only need 10 gallons to go about 1,000 miles, and you can go 20-30 mph - would take you maybe 7 days. at a leisurely pace, and you could carry more gear. use the 53 days and a lot of pain end effort you'd save yourself up front, and find an old moped. just throwing some ideas out at you, and yea - load that thing up - and dump what you don't think you'll need depending on scenario.

a bicycle as suggested is also a great idea.
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Old 06-01-2020, 09:28 PM
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WHEN you say full size and then small backup.. you are talking about rifle and pistol???

Look, just throwing it out there...

You are miles from home and you are NOT looking for a firefight, you just want to get away and get home.

Have you considered carrying firearms where both use the same ammo
and
if fortunate enough to find them, even use the same mags?
What come to mind are the Marlin camp rifles, in .45 that uses a 1911 mag and their 9mm used a S&W mag.

just curious.

Otherwise you can always find some 9mm or .45 chambered long gun and then it means you can get the most out of your ammo choices.
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Old 06-01-2020, 10:44 PM
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I think the chances of walking 1000 miles in SHTF are extraordinary low regardless of your pack or physical condition.

Regardless of wether you are capable of walking 20 miles a day, day after day, remember that you are in a world so dangerous, so disrupted that you have to walk 1000 miles. This means a major, world changing event, full on apocalypse. Millions dead, millions more dying about you.

You will not be walking 20 miles a day in that kind of world. You may be hold up in a culvert all day hiding and then carefully picking your way five miles at a time during the night. There may be days when you don't travel at all. You may spend months at a time waiting out weather, forest fires, regional warfare. You would be very lucky to finish the trip in a year, and being on the road....well, you won't be on the road, you will have to be in the woods and hills to have a chance....being out and about, and trying to move, over that much distance, over that much time....virtually impossible.

Your pack is fine...but it's the least of your worries.
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Old 06-01-2020, 10:54 PM
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So here's mine...

* Maybe lose the backup and extra mags? Thinking is if you need more than a couple mags in a situation, chances are you're already screwed. And yes, I get the two is one and one is none philosophy, but we're talking about probabilities and outcomes here. If I had a reliable weapon, I'd maybe take the risk it's not going to choose this one time to go bad and throw in another day of food and some toilet paper instead. Stuff I'd KNOW I'd need for sure.

* More socks. And you know yourself best, but maybe something even more for foot care. Whether that's an anti fungal cream or bandaids or something for blister pads, I don't know. It's all up to what you know about yourself. If you're used to a lot of heavy walking, no problem. But of all the crap you might go through, it's your feet having problems that could stop you cold. Fresh socks, clean socks, proper foot care will be really important. I don't do the same kind of longer distance backpacking trips that I used to. But when I did, having fresh socks was a big deal. And this way, you can wash other pairs and they'll have time to try on top of your pack.

* Can you throw a bicycle in whatever vehicle you're using? Even if you have to ditch it, maybe it'll turn your first couple days into 40 - 50 mile days instead of 10 - 20. And if the bike/tires/you lasted the whole time? Maybe cut your whole trip in half even if you're pushing it up some bigger hills.

* Any way to cache anything on the trip out if it's the same route out and back? You can't behave as if you can fully depend on them, but they could ease things a lot if they're there. Especially if you can put some food/water along or before the last push you mention will be through desert. A cache right before this that maybe even includes a nicer tent or tarp or something where you could be more comfortable for a day of rest before that last big push might be a good thing.

* I'd assume your knife, (or besides your knife), you've got a multitool. Besides repairs, etc., the small pliers should work on water sillcocks should you need to get water that way.
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Old 06-01-2020, 11:12 PM
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So here's mine...

* Maybe lose the backup and extra mags? Thinking is if you need more than a couple mags in a situation, chances are you're already screwed. And yes, I get the two is one and one is none philosophy, but we're talking about probabilities and outcomes here. If I had a reliable weapon, I'd maybe take the risk it's not going to choose this one time to go bad and throw in another day of food and some toilet paper instead. Stuff I'd KNOW I'd need for sure.
I was at an AK build party in New Orleans La, and a buddy I had known For years was there. I trusted him with a loaded gun at my back and he volunteered to go pick up wings.

I made some comment about his carry gun and was amazed that he responded he hasn't brought it!

I handed him my Glock 19 and pulled my Glock 26 from my pocket and put it in my belt holster till he got back.

There are MANY reasons to have a second handgun. PARTICULARLY as. (Unlike a shotgun or rifle) There Is only one state most of us can buy one.

When I travel I tend to carry EXTRA handguns. (Meaning more than the 2 I have on me if I'm wearing pants.)

If I need to bury a Glock or J frame wrapped in several plastic bags at mile marker XYZ.... (That I may be able to retrieve one day)

Meh. Thats not NEARLY as bad as not having it when I need it.

I also carry "loose rounds"
If I fire off 1-2 I don't want to be carrying partially loaded mags.

I can and have wiped my ass with leaves and stones.
Neither one will fit my magazines.

I've eaten bugs and raw critters.

Water and ammo.
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Old 06-01-2020, 11:34 PM
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Originally Posted by badlands View Post
I am going on an 1000 mile trip, I packed my get home bag with everything I thought I would need to get home, I figured it would probably take me 2 months to get home at 20 miles a day. Going over everything in the pack I tried to carry just what I would need, about 1 weeks worth of food, 2- 48 oz bottles of water, two changes of underwear, socks and t shirts. Full size self protection with two extra mags and a small back up with 1 extra mag, light weight cooking stove and fuel tabs, 1 first aid kit and 1 trauma kit, med and hygiene kit, Knife, Spork, light weight small sleeping bag, a rain poncho, compass, fire starting kit, small led flashlight, a high quality Monocular, a compact katadyne water filter and a life straw as back up. Small titanium pot with lid. titanium spork, Paper and pen, deck of cards and a harmonica, The issue is I am at 38lbs and I can't really think of anything I don't need in the pack, especially if I was on the road for two months. I will be eating the food and drinking water which will reduce the weight, though I will be refilling the water bottles, I'm carrying two 48 oz water bottles as I will be trekking thru the desert on the last 200 miles. So what do you think? is a 38lb pack doable, should I get rid of any weight or should I add anything additional for the trip? I see that most backpackers try to keep there bags under 30 lbs.
I lived in the mojave desert for +30 yrs.
No one crosses 200 miles of desert with only (2) 48 oz water bottles. Traveling on foot, you will consume that anount of water daily.

If we were talking about southern California, or Arizona, you could possibly follow an aquaduct, and refill those bottles as needed.
But if you plan to cross a desert without resupply, or transportation, you need to rethink your plan.

One possibility is buy/steal a bicycle, and cross the desert portion in two days. Riding at night should help, and so would a couple 6L water bags.
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Old 06-02-2020, 05:29 AM
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Depending on your physical conditioning, terrain, and access to water, most on-foot travel without resupply is going to be less than 200 miles. Speed of travel has way too many conditions to factor in and I’m just referring to a less-lethal, permissive environment (like backpacking). Maintaining 20 miles a day is doable, but is extremely dependent on your physical conditioning and a high caloric intake.

Having a pack and a plan is still better than no plan, but the more you analyze, assess, test, and train, the more gaps you’ll find.

For about 8 months I was working away from home, about 550 miles. Other than keeping my vehicle topped off and in good mechanical working condition, I planned for a worst case scenario of not having my truck. Yes, I had a pack and it was loaded for about 10 days and/or 100 miles of foot travel…something I’ve done a couple times and I know my personal capabilities. I needed an alternate method of travel to fill in that gap of distance, and settled on a folding mountain bike (easier to transport when I was using my wife’s smaller car for the first few months). I added a trailer and did some riding. While I wasn’t blazing the biking trails with the trailer, my pack, extra food and a little extra ammo, I was covering way more distance than if on foot. Where I average 12-15 miles a day on foot, I could easily do 50-60 miles a day with the bike (again, terrain, weather, and obstacles are significant factors). A bike with trailer would get me three to four times further than just on foot for the same time. A mountain bike isn’t as mobile as you would be on foot, but you can traverse off-road terrain pretty good.

Road maps are critical for those distances. You’ll need several alternate routes to bypass or navigate major obstacles be they manmade or natural. You’ll need to plan routes with water resupply…and often. If the environment is potentially hostile and less-permissive, you’ll be avoiding people, traveling backroads, powerlines cuts, railroads, etc. and most likely traveling at night or early in the morning. Weather is a significant factor. Consider the rainy-flooding season, winter weather impacts, summer/heat impacts, etc. Exposure would likely be a bigger threat than any kinetic engagements we always conjure up…

After your 10 days of food, what’s your plan? Hunting is low-probability and time-intensive. I don’t know your route, but a small compact fishing kit with fish snares and small game snares can be used far more effectively. Put them out at night or early in the morning, check and retrieve. It will slow you down, but could extend your rations.

Keep your vehicle running, consider adding a mountain bike, and make sure you’re physically able to carry a pack 100+miles or at least sustain that 15-20 miles a day for several days.

ROCK6
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Old 06-02-2020, 06:23 AM
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. If the environment is potentially hostile and less-permissive, you’ll be avoiding people, traveling backroads, powerlines cuts, railroads, etc. and most likely traveling at night or early in the morning.
Can anyone imagine a situation where you need to walk 1000 miles in an environment that is not hostile?

What kind of scenario are we really playing with here? An emp that kills all the vehicles but where everyone stays orderly and peaceful enough that you can just concentrate on walking and not hiding?

In that case, stick a bar of gold in your pack and buy a horse, or a bicycle, or a boat from the none hostile residents. Any mode of transport is going to be faster and safer than walking, unless the crisis is so extreme that all modes of transport are destroyed...which would also result in a world so hostile that a man on foot wouldn't have a chance of covering 20 miles a day, or living on the road for long.

Or is it a scenario that rapidly kills nearly everyone but yourself, leaving you free to just concentrate on hiking and foraging?

Consider this, if facing a 1000 mile, two month walk under hostile conditions, it would almost certainly be better to shelter in place for those two months and wait for better conditions Or transportation options than to attempt a walk out.

Before even imaging such a walk in SHTF you should try to make it 20 miles starting from your proposed starting point without being seen by another human and seeing just how much ground you can actually cover. I think you will find that rather than covering miles per hour you will find yourself thinking more in terms of yards per hour.

If your thinking of foraging, calculate how much hunting you would have to do to find, kill and cook 3-4,000 calories per day for seven weeks.

Keep in mind, that is about 2-3 whole chickens a day, 15 squirrels or trout, 40 cups of berries...I don't know about you...but I'm not picking 40 cups of berries and still having time left over for 20 miles of covert high security travel in a day.

Really look at the logistics here.
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Old 06-02-2020, 07:00 AM
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Can anyone imagine a situation where you need to walk 1000 miles in an environment that is not hostile?
Nope, but it does create a distinction much like between trail backpacking and bugging home. I do think if it is some worst-case EMP scenario, you'll likely make good time on roads for the first few days (again, depending on your location). We have sedition and riots occurring in cities, but the majority of the country is still peaceful with no impacts.

For me and my assessments, you have about 72 hours after a significant crisis before "hostile and less permissive" SHTF. Aside from that, you're right about logistics and how much "discreet trekking" will impact your pace.

Even when on a trail, I hit almost 22 miles on day seven of a hike...I was pretty tired, most of my attention was where I was stepping, and all I could think about was getting some hot food in my stomach, get cleaned up, and relax in my hammock. That's a recipe for being a victim post SHTF and things turn hostile and less permissive. Once you go into "patrol" mode and situational awareness is paramount to your survival, your pace will drop significantly and that doesn't even account for weather conditions, terrain, and constant rerouting to stay discreet, etc.

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Old 06-02-2020, 07:29 AM
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Bring a large amount of cash. If you have to use your pack and bail from your ride go buy a bike and strap the pack to it. Go from 20 miles a day to 50. Plus the weight will not be a big factor. Might only want to bring 10 round mags if you are driving through anti gun states.
Good to go on the cash, I will throw my bike in the truck before I take off, Great idea!
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Old 06-02-2020, 07:30 AM
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Ammo and water.

Never enough.
I Agree 100%
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