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Old 12-11-2019, 04:42 AM
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We always plan for worse case, so I'll second the sentiments about keeping your vehicle maintained and no less than a half tank of gas at all times.

Have you mapped alternate routes? If your primary is inaccessible, it's best to have alternate plans already mapped and reconnoitered.

Mountain bike. Even a cheap one left at work or in the back of a vehicle is the most efficient, and cost-effective option to travel moderate distances that on-foot can compete with.

I do a lot of backpacking and 54 miles would likely take me 3-4 days depending on the terrain and weather. Most don't consider the effects of traveling on foot in the woods (off trail) in the dark or low illumination and possibly with a steady rain...it will make you slow down significantly.

A cache isn't a bad idea. For 50 miles, I would only plan one and it doesn't even have to be extravagant. Find a spot you can find or mark about half way. Simple 5 gallon buck with a few freeze dried meals, Sawyer water filter, water container and maybe a small cooking pot and spoon. You could add a small FAK and knife, but in reality, your resupply really only requires food and water to keep you going...this is all assuming you keep your get home bag close at hand at all times. About $50-75 and 30 minutes with a shovel is all that is needed and if stolen or lost isn't a significant loss and it can be easily replaced during annual or semi-annual inspections.

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Old 12-11-2019, 09:54 AM
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Another thing that's really tricky about walking versus driving--

You get so used to being in a car, you can misjudge the distance on foot, if you're just going by what it feels like, and don't actually measure the mileage ever.

A lot of trips in a car that you're used to thinking of as a hop, skip, and a jump are a little bit epic on foot.

I'm sure a lot of our people are too smart to fall for that, but probably it will get a lot of the unprepared.

Was just looking through my own bags. From time to time, I question a lot of my items.

Out of everything you could question, food is one that's a good idea unless you really always stay within pretty close distances of your home. It could be that illusion I described above is making you think of not including it. But probably most people should at least have something like a few granola bars and a little water in there.

If there's any chance the get-home situation could take a day or more, it could help you out a lot.

I bet toilet paper is another one that the car-vs-walking illusion could trick some people out of including.
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Old 12-11-2019, 02:28 PM
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Out of everything you could question, food is one that's a good idea unless you really always stay within pretty close distances of your home. It could be that illusion I described above is making you think of not including it. But probably most people should at least have something like a few granola bars and a little water in there.
It's taken me probably a hundred miles to gauge time and distance when on foot. A map and compass are essential, but you're right that straight line distance never works out as straight line when on foot.

Water is more critical than food, but food is still another essential. Sure, you won't starve, but if you're trekking on foot with an empty and growling stomach, the mental challenge increases to the point you're going to make a mistake. It may be missing a turn or change of direction, loss of situational awareness, increased chances of a mechanical injury, and if it's cold weather, you need the calories for your metabolism.

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Old 12-12-2019, 09:13 AM
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[QUOTE=Steve_In_29;19908670]I was talking about a route for your shtf escape plans, not for the daily commute during the good times.

Take the alternate route on your way home every so often to keep updated on anything that might be a problem.

/QUOTE]. Make written notes about the: Route or routes; who has dogs; water on the route i.e. streams or brooks and lakes; camp grounds; railroad crossings; places to shelter; office buildings; school buildings; first aid and fire department buildings; doctors offices and medical clinics; hospitals; stores by type; hiking trails; places to hide and the list continues....
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Old 12-17-2019, 03:03 PM
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I was enjoying this thread...

Then I realized I was making assumptions about my own possible get-home situation, and decided to check it out on Google Maps.

Ended up, places that I go to are 75 miles, 70, 60, 44, and 32 away! That's epic. I could spend a week or two getting home... It's not just two or three days a year that I'm at these places...

Think I need to add some food to my get-home bags.

You might say that it will be pretty bad luck if SHTF or if the grid goes down when you are at the maximum distance from your home.

But luck is actually on the side of the event happening when you are over there.

Maybe you spend 2 hours round trip traveling to the beach. But then it's at least a four or five hour day at the beach.

Depending on whether we're talking about work, or whatever it may be, a quarter or a third of the probability pie chart may have you partway home. But the entire rest of it will have you at the maximum distance from your home.

Plus, it won't just be you on the road.

Everyone else in your state who was out somewhere will be walking home. The world will be thrown into chaos. Instead of just some lonely experience, it could be as if you're looking at some medieval painting of hell.

I'm not thinking as optimistically about it anymore... Rather, it's starting to seem like a big part of what determines whether you survive the entire apocalypse, will be whether you happened to be at home, or out someplace far away when SHTF.
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Old 12-28-2019, 04:04 PM
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Most cities don't have this problem but on those that an island (NYC is the primary example in the U.S.), not a car not probably a bike or scooter will get one out. Right after 9/11, all bridges/tunnels were shut for hours trapping people who did not live on the island there. Some towns outside of NYC started issuing bridge passes in hopes of their residents who commuted to be prioritized in being let thru and out.

There was a survival/escape type show that showed what one could do in that situation and the answer was a portable/packable flotation raft. This is why the really rich elitists who normally you wouldn't find discussing survivalist topics, have expensive boats ready to take 'em off the island during real prolonged shtf.

another thing is getting of a high rise. some companies started selling escape chutes though they just never took off as a feasible solution. if one is stuck up there during shtf, it would be a pretty tough day.
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Old 12-29-2019, 05:28 PM
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All good points and suggestions guys! Keep em comin!
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Old 12-29-2019, 06:32 PM
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Walking with a pack isn't the same as walking without. Make sure your pack fits and is light enough for you to manage easily, because grams add up to ounces, ounces add up to pounds, and pounds = pain

If you have to sleep with what you have in BOB/GHB, make sure you can rest/sleep well. Not everyone can do a hamock and tarp thing. I had to have a sleeping bag, pad, and tent with no-see-um netting and a floor to get the sleep I needed. I also sleep cold and have a hard time in a sleeping bag, so I needed a warm sleeping bag that I could modify into a quilt-type thing, that I could haul to cover 150 miles or more. So, I got the lightest stuff I could (titanium, ultralight tent, ultralight down sleeping bag, etc.). Fortunately, I no longer have to worry about such distances, or commuting at all for that matter

Make sure everything is packed to stay dry.

Learn skills to collect and filter/purify water. Learn where resupply places are between work and home. If you need a silcock key and/or knob, get it/them.

The only way for you to know what works for you is to try it out. Sleep in your back yard with whatever shelter and sleeping system... you might be surprised. The good thing is you have the safety of your house/apartment/condo to retreat to if the need arises.

Try walking the same route you drive without a pack. A sustained walk over distance isn't the same as the walking/intermitent walking done in most work situations.

Here's an SB thread you may find useful

Your BOB Probably Weighs Too Much
https://www.survivalistboards.com/sh...d.php?t=406660
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Old 12-29-2019, 06:46 PM
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So the wife got me a maxpedition sitka gear slinger for my anniversary. God I love this woman. I have packed it accordingly to my route to and from work as my new get home bag.

I realized I did not have items in the larger one that I thought I did such as bandannas and moleskin. ESPECIALLY moleskin considering the possibility of being on foot for so long if the shtf. Well, items to put on the buy list.

I bought a sawyer mini for my new bag and let the wife keep the larger Sawyer in her bag. She really liked the vertx bag I had been using and gladly took it once I swapped the gear out. Plus the vertx bag has great cushion in the backplate and straps which work better for her and her back.

I got a trauma kit/IFAK as a Christmas gift and after swapping out some oddball stuff with stuff I would rather have I fastened it to the molle on my new bag. For the most part it was a pretty even swap. I had to leave my folded tarp in the old bag as it would not fit in my new one so I’ll have to look into getting a suitable replacement for a smaller bag. All in all I love the gearslinger type of bag So far and I believe it will do well.

Edit: Forgot to mention that I also put a life straw and a water container in the new pack as well. The container in my old bag would not fit in the pouch on the new maxpedition.
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Old 12-29-2019, 06:50 PM
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Walking with a pack isn't the same as walking without. Make sure your pack fits and is light enough for you to manage easily, because grams add up to ounces, ounces add up to pounds, and pounds = pain [IMG class=inlineimg]https://www.survivalistboards.com/images/smilies/eek.gif[/IMG]

If you have to sleep with what you have in BOB/GHB, make sure you can rest/sleep well. Not everyone can do a hamock and tarp thing. I had to have a sleeping bag, pad, and tent with no-see-um netting and a floor to get the sleep I needed. I also sleep cold and have a hard time in a sleeping bag, so I needed a warm sleeping bag that I could modify into a quilt-type thing, that I could haul to cover 150 miles or more. So, I got the lightest stuff I could (titanium, ultralight tent, ultralight down sleeping bag, etc.). Fortunately, I no longer have to worry about such distances, or commuting at all for that matter [IMG class=inlineimg]https://www.survivalistboards.com/images/smilies/upsidedown.gif[/IMG]

Make sure everything is packed to stay dry.

Learn skills to collect and filter/purify water. Learn where resupply places are between work and home. If you need a silcock key and/or knob, get it/them.

The only way for you to know what works for you is to try it out. Sleep in your back yard with whatever shelter and sleeping system... you might be surprised. The good thing is you have the safety of your house/apartment/condo to retreat to if the need arises.

Try walking the same route you drive without a pack. A sustained walk over distance isn't the same as the walking/intermitent walking done in most work situations.

Here's an SB thread you may find useful

Your BOB Probably Weighs Too Much
https://www.survivalistboards.com/sh...d.php?t=406660
Yes. The wife and I both are very much wanting to test run our bags just to see how quickly life will “critique” our efforts.
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Old 12-29-2019, 08:16 PM
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Yes. The wife and I both are very much wanting to test run our bags just to see how quickly life will “critique” our efforts.
Since it's not SHTF...safety first.

Dry run your stuff in the back yard.
Dry run your stuff on a short walk (maybe around the block, or take to a park (OPSEC) and walk some. You'll likely have to adjust some stuff).
Dry run your stuff on a longer hike, preferably someplace fun that you can drive to and near where you're going to overnight.

Always have at least one fully charged cell phone and with you and when you ovenight away from the house, make sure you have someone arranged to come get you if need be.

The first time you walk from work, do it without your pack and have your wife nearby with the car to bail you out, provide water/food, etc. so you're not walking that far the first time with a pack...

If anyone asks, you're getting ready to hike AP. etc., or some other "non=prepper" excuse
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Old 12-30-2019, 04:20 AM
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Yes. The wife and I both are very much wanting to test run our bags just to see how quickly life will “critique” our efforts.
Since it's not SHTF...safety first.

Dry run your stuff in the back yard.
Dry run your stuff on a short walk (maybe around the block, or take to a park (OPSEC) and walk some. You'll likely have to adjust some stuff).
Dry run your stuff on a longer hike, preferably someplace fun that you can drive to and near where you're going to overnight.

Always have at least one fully charged cell phone and with you and when you ovenight away from the house, make sure you have someone arranged to come get you if need be.

The first time you walk from work, do it without your pack and have your wife nearby with the car to bail you out, provide water/food, etc. so you're not walking that far the first time with a pack...

If anyone asks, you're getting ready to hike AP. etc., or some other "non=prepper" excuse [IMG class=inlineimg]https://www.survivalistboards.com/images/smilies/smile.gif[/IMG]
I like that lol hike the AP.
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Old 01-02-2020, 10:57 AM
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You need a bicycle as a backup. Even if you're not in the greatest shape, you should be able to get home from work in about 6 hours, give or take, on a bike. Walking, you're talking 3 days minimum but realistically probably more.

3-4 days is a long time to get home and a lot of opportunity for something to go wrong. You need to get home within 48 hours to limit your risk. The shock of the event will take some time to set in, and once it does, you become vulnerable.
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Old 01-02-2020, 02:43 PM
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my commute (fairly new job) is 80 miles each way. right now... I'm screwed. I have no other plans. I am on an AF base, so if something goes wrong they tend to lock down the base almost immediately. I probably wouldn't get off the base for a while. I could bring a bike in and keep it at work. I actually thought about this the other day when I was at Tractor Supply and saw a cheap mini-bike there. That seems like a great idea if I could find a place to keep it here. 20-40mph sounds a LOT better than hoofing it, better than a bike too. I'm going to look into that. I have a friend who lives about 15 miles away and in-between work and home. I could keep a bike here and bike to his house. Keep a mini-bike in his garage for the rest of the trip. I could manage that. Just 2-3 years ago I could have hiked it with no probs but now with back issues, I can't walk too far at all especially with a pack.
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Old 01-02-2020, 05:00 PM
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I have heavily been considering a bike as a means of travel especially a folding one that could store in the trunk of the car. Keeping it in my truck is a lot less hassle for obvious reasons.

The more I think about it, the more logical it keeps sounding. I’m gonna keep doing some research on affordable versions and I’ll post what I come up with.
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Old 01-02-2020, 05:01 PM
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https://www.amazon.com/Eurobike-Susp...a-727530990921
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Old 01-02-2020, 05:05 PM
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https://www.amazon.com/adult-folding...8&node=3405101

Reviews on certain models seem decent. The price point being very much in favor for the wife and I.

Some models I have seen are as far north as $1500! Honestly a couple hundred bucks should get a good one. Make sure to get spare tubes and other regular maintenance items as well!
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Old 01-02-2020, 05:08 PM
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The ones with smaller tires will most likely store more easily with the downside of being less comfortable? I think mileage achieved overall in the midst of an event will negate that creature comfort.
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Old 03-08-2020, 11:16 PM
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Do you guys/gals commute for work? If so, what preps do you have in place should the shtf while you are at work?



I ask because I am always looking to better my preps and foresight with my commute and always hoping for the best while preparing for the worst.



My situation and preps in place: I have a 108 mile round trip drive to work 5-7 days a week. I keep a ghb that is setup for a possible(worst come to worst) 54 mile walk home. The majority of my drive is highway with no city miles. I plan on hand railing on the trek home and then breaking off and cross cutting in areas that are fully wooded and unsettled that I have researched over time. I have multiple ways of obtaining water as well as good foot wear and If unimpeded, I feel that my time until I get home will be approximately 24-40 hours. The time frame will obviously be up in the air and it‚Äs mostly my confidence speaking.



I have considered strategically placing caches along the way, but haven‚Ät made up my mind on that yet. We each prep for different reasons from one another for the most part so my reasons may be different from yours and my loadout is tailored as such.



What concerns do you have for a shtf situation when your far away?


I commute 50 miles each way now. I actually keep my mountain bike on the back of my truck in the warmer months and ride at work on lunch. If I need it in a bad situation, itís there.

I keep my bag locked up in the truck along with a braced AR pistol in a Truckvault safe. I also have a bin in back with some semi-expendable goodies. If I need to ditch the truck I can grab a few waters and clif bars, toss them in my bag, and hit the road.

A bike, as many have already noted, can make such a trip achievable in a day as opposed to several days or a week. No matter what your means of transportation, always have an actual idea of what the path home may entail. You might not be able to take the road, and you may need to be avoiding people.

Thinking worst case, and I am on the road for a week or longer, my bag provides me with some key essentials to get me home. If I need to bug out of the city I work in now, I have about 10 miles to clear on foot/bike that would actually be kind of dicey. Then itís cornfields for 35 or so miles, then back into a similar dicey area south of the city I live, then suburbs and home.

A map and compass is key, but so is having already traveled some alternate paths. Know them via car and on foot. If something ever happens that necessitates people all wanting to get home immediately, you best know back roads.


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Old 03-09-2020, 04:11 PM
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You need a bicycle as a backup. Even if you're not in the greatest shape, you should be able to get home from work in about 6 hours, give or take, on a bike. Walking, you're talking 3 days minimum but realistically probably more.

3-4 days is a long time to get home and a lot of opportunity for something to go wrong. You need to get home within 48 hours to limit your risk. The shock of the event will take some time to set in, and once it does, you become vulnerable.
The bicycle is a wonderful invention!
On level ground you move farther and faster than walking with the same effort.
Downhill is free~!
You can push it uphill and it's hardly any more effort than walking.
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