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Old 04-06-2007, 04:40 PM
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Check this posting regularly, because I plan to add more herbs to the post!
Peppermint (Mentha Piperita)

USE: Peppermint is one of the best all around herbs going. It has antispasmodic qualities that help cramps and stomach pain. It aids digestion and lessens the amount of time food spends in the stomach by stimulating the gastric lining, and it also relieves gas. It is good for stomachache, nausea, heartburn and vomiting. Anyone who has had the flu knows how bad your mouth starts to taste after a while. We, sometimes, mix a drop or two of peppermint oil into water, stir and sip it when we have been sick. It makes your mouth taste better, and it helps calm your upset stomach. This herb calms the body, and it even works on coughs. A strong cup of tea and lying down for a bit can reduce migraine symptoms. It works on colic in kids and babies, and I had read in an old Herb book called Culpeper's Herbal, which was written back in the 1700's, that it can reduce fevers. A friend of mine, who had a daughter of 4 yrs., had been battling a fever with the child for over three days. They were alternating between tylenol and some other fever reducer, so that they could give it to her every two hours. She was running between 102 and 103 degrees, and my friend was afraid the doctor would put her in the hospital. I remembered reading that it could help, so I suggested it to my friend. She made a cup of hot peppermint tea for her daughter, and within three hours the fever broke. I have never seen anything about that in more modern herbals, but it worked. Peppermint has a very refreshing quality about it, so drinking it as cold tea can give you a mental pick-me-up, and amazingly, it can help with insomnia. Lastly, you can mix peppermint essential oil into a carrier oil to help relieve sore muscles by stimulating blood flow to a problem area or injury. An example of carrier oils would be, Almond Oil, Sesame Oil, and even Mineral Oil, but that one goes rancid quicker. Most essential oils are too strong to put directly on your skin, because they are highly concentrated and will burn or cause irritation, so it is necessary to mix ten or so drops into 2 or 3 ounces of the carrier oil, and use that way.
GROWING: It is very easy to grow. It loves all soil types, but especially rich soil that gets lots of water. It is a perennial, so it comes back every year with little or no effort. Cut stems as they get long and dry thoroughly. Crunch the leaves off the stems, once dried, into a large paper bag, so you have room to work. Then put them in smaller bags and label. To use, simply put leaves in a tea ball, place in your cup and pour boiling water over them.
Let them steep for about 5 minutes, and you have your tea. Adding sugar or honey helps to take the herb straight into your system, because the herb piggy-backs the sugar and is absorbed directly.


Garlic (Alluim Sativum)

Garlic has been called the herbal world's version of a wonder drug. One of the main ingredients in garlic is Allicin, which works like an antibiotic, and reacts by changing itself into many sulfides and sulfur compounds. Boiling, and I believe cooking at all, will weaken or kill the allicin, and cause the garlic to actually benifit bacteria. Throughout the history of the world, Garlic has been used, even as far back as the Egyptians, who fed it to their slaves to give them stamina and keep them healthy. (An interesting side bar here ... I read an article in which they did research on garlic using hunting dogs, and half the pack was fed garlic in their food, the other half wasn't. To exercise the animals they use to get them to run behind a farm truck, chasing a decoy inside, for a couple of miles. After three months, the dogs that had been fed the garlic were able to stay with the truck, and were much less exhausted, while the half who did not get the garlic, were about 150 yards behind the truck and very tired.) Dr. Schweitzer treated amebic dysentery, cholera and typhus, back in the 50's, when he was a missionary in Africa with Garlic, and it was widely used on the battlefields during the 1st and 2nd World War, before antibiotics became readily available. Today, one of the main uses of Garlic, is as a preventive for heart disease. Scientists have found that it opens blood vessels and thins the blood, as well as lowering levels of cholesterol. Garlic is known to kill some harmful fungi and bacteria, and works like an broad range antibiotic on minor health problems like: bronchitis, laryngitis, sinusitis, sore throat, coughs, colds, Candida, and even athlete's foot fungus. During the 1st World Was it was used with sphagnum moss that had been sterilized and soaked in garlic oil, to cover infected injuries, and it had much success in preventing gangrene. I have seen an article somewhere, though I can't find it, stating that Garlic juice was used as a disinfectant, and I think the ratio stated a few parts per million, would kill virus and surface bacteria. At the very least, I would be confident that three or four severely mashed up cloves in a bucket of water, would do the trick. Modern science has even seen evidence that it can destroy some cancer cells and research is currently being done in that area. It works as a digestive aid, relieves gas, and heats the body to help promote sweating, thereby expelling toxins from the system. CAUTION: Eating 10 or more raw garlic cloves in a day can be toxic. According to "Earl Mindell's Herb Bible", two or three cloves a day will give optimum benefits. Personally, eating the cloves raw was a little harsh for me, until my dad taught me to cover the clove in peanut butter. Makes it a lot easier to chew up and swallow, and I have no problems doing it that way. When I feel a cold coming on, I reach for the garlic cloves! I can't begin to cover all the things garlic benefits here, but if you are interested in learning more, get a copy of the book, "The Garlic Book ... Nature's Powerful Healer", by Stephen Fulder, Ph.D. , and read up! It is available for about $8.95 from Avery Publishing Group.
Growing: They grow well in containers or gardens, and like rich, free draining soil. Plant single clove buds 3-4 inches apart and 1 inch deep. They take 6-8months to grow to harvest size and planting can vary. There are many varieties to coincide with varied climates. Some plant in early November to be harvested in July, others plant in September for a summer crop, or plant in February for a fall harvest. It depends on the type of garlic, so read up! Additionally, the growing shoots can be cut for salads or cooking, and they can be planted in with fast growing salads to maximize your growing space.


Catnip (Nepeta Cataria)

Catnip, which is in the mint family, is a wonderful herb. Some of you are familiar with it, because you have cats, and like to watch them act crazy when they are around it, but Catnip has the opposite effect on people. When taken by humans, it has a calming action, because it is a mild sedative, that can relax and bring about sleep. It isn't like a drug sedative that makes you groggy, but it relaxes naturally. A hot cup of Catnip tea with some cream and a bit of honey can really be great after a stressful day, and Catnip has a very pleasant flavor. In Europe, the herb is used to treat diarrhea and bronchitis, and because it has a warming effect on the body, it can promote sweating. Another use for this herb is for cramps and stomach upset, as it can ease gas and indigestion.
Growing: Catnip is very easy to grow, just like most mints, it will grow like crazy just about anywhere it has some moisture, and it is a perennial, so it comes back year after year. I harvest it throughout the growing season, once the stems get some height to them. See my other post on "Harvesting Herbs and Making Tinctures and Syrups".


Lungwort (Pulmonaria Officinalis)

This herb, in a combined tincture with Marshmallow Root is my remedy of choice for chest congestion, bronchitis and upper respiratory infections. Lungwort works to break up lung congestion, as it has good expectorant qualities, and helps with coughs and hoarseness. It is very soothing to the throat, and as an added benifit, can cure diarrhea. This works well on a stomach virus that has a cough with it. One caution here, I said above that I mix the Lungwort and Marshmallow Root together, but I would suggest that if you are interested in trying these herbs, harvest and tincture them out seperately, and try each seperately, before you attempt to mix them, to make sure your system isn't sensitive to them. Then only mix a portion of your herb or tinctures, about what you think you will use for the illness. I have said previously, I am not a doctor, but am relating to you information I have learned by my own trials. It is always best if you see an herb you want to try, to do some research on your own, and learn all you can about the herb in question.
Growing: I can't give you much advise on growing this herb, as I have always bought the dried herb and made my own tincture out of it. I have, however, purchased seed this year, and I intend to start a crop to go with my Marshmallow, so hopefully I can update this part by mid summer. The leaves are the part used, and I can tell you that Lungwort is a perennial, so once planted, it will return every year.


Marshmallow (Althea Officinalis)

Marshmallow has a variety of applications. It is used to treat ulcers, colitis and enteritis, because when combined with water, it's high mucilage content makes a gel-like substance that is very soothing on irritated mucous membranes thus helping to relieve the pain. It also works great on a sore, raw throat and chest, caused by coughing and bronchitis. It is a wonderful expectorant for coughs, and it helps to calm the body. I use the root of this plant to tincture out, and mix equal amounts of Marshmallow and Lungwort tincture for my upper respiratory infections. Works great for me, and I will take about half a dropper full, four or five times a day of the tinctured liquid, until I am better.
Growing: This is an easy plant to grow, and it is another perennial, so it returns every year. The stalks get about three and a half feet high, and the roots increase yearly. I have it planted in my back border, which gets a medium amount of afternoon sun, and it flourishes.

Dandelion (Taraxacum Officinale)

Dandelion is a truly remarkable herb, although most people look at is as being a weed, but then again, most herbs are weeds ... at least to those, ignorant of their true value. To begin with, Dandelion greens are totally edible, although the younger leaves tend to be more tender for that purpose. Cut the leaves off close to the ground, but don't damage the heart of the plant. In the summer, the leaves have a slight bitter taste, but in the winter they are mild and smooth. They cook up like salad greens, and with a little seasoning, ham bouillon cubes maybe, are quite good, especially if you are hungry ... and they are good for digestion! Additionally, they have a cleansing effect on the blood, which helps to detox your body. These pesky little "weeds" are rich in minerals, Vitamin C, silicic acids, tannins, aklaloids, iron, potassium, and lecithin. The iron may be enough to prevent iron-deficiency anemia. The lecithin helps lower cholesterol, and it is believed by researchers that lecithin can protect against cirrhosis of the liver. It is a natural diuretic, which unlike prescription fluid pills, contain large amounts of potassium, which it puts into your body. One of the harmful side effects of fluid pills, is that they deplete the body's levels of potassium, which is needed in conjunction with sodium, to regulate your body's water balance, which in turn normalized the heart rhythms. Lowering the body's fluid levels may also aid in lowering blood pressure, by reducing the amount of fluid the heart has to pump. Dandelion has been found to enhance gallbladder and liver function, and has been used on patients with liver disorders and jaundice. Eating the fresh stalks for a couple of weeks can help with skin rashes, diabetes, rheumatism and kidney stones ... or drink a cup of the tea to achieve the same effect. The root of the plant can be taken, washed, cut into small pieces and roasted in the oven for between 10 and 15 minutes at a temperature of 450-480 degrees, and then ground to produce a caffeine-free coffee substitute. Digging the root for this purpose is best done in the spring and fall. (One note here - some people are allergic to dandelion)
Growing: Duhhh! Look out your back door! (Sorry, I just couldn't resist joking for a second there) One tip though, don't gather them from road sides or places where they could have come in contact with pesticides, fertilizer, or contaminents. There are some species that you can grow on purpose, a couple being the "Vollherziger", "Lyonel" and the "Nouvelle". These last two grow well in winter, and all in this group have been grown for vegetable gardens, with a less bitter taste. They grow well in full sun to part shade, with rich, deep, loose soil > or anywhere you don't want them to grow!

Milk Thistle (Cardus Marianus)

Here is an interesting herb that is fairly unknown in this country, which is more the pity, but in Europe it is a well known tonic for the liver. It contains something called, Silymarin, which is a flavonoid that has a direct effect on liver cells. These substances work with Vitamin C. Now basically, your liver is what cleans and filters the poisons out of your body, and that is critical to maintaining good health. The liver produces bile, which your body needs to break down fats, and it detoxifies the poisons in our bloodstream, like alcohol, nicotine, pollutants, etc. Basically, it takes substances that are lethal, and converts them into less harmful substances. Vitamins A, D, E and K are also stored in the liver. Now the liver is the only organ that can regenerate itself, and if part of the liver is removed, it will grow back. How cool is that? Milk Thistle detoxes the liver and improves overall liver function, along with helping stimulate the production of new liver cells. This is especially helpful in people who have inflammation of the liver, hepatitis, cirrhosis or are around pollutants or smoke. When my dog's got sick over the Diamond Dog Food Recall a year ago, I lost two of them. Their liver was so poisoned that it killed them. The vet told me there was nothing that could be done, and that it would have to run it's course. I was frantically doing research trying to find a way to save them. Sadly, I lost the two females, and even sadder, I learned about the Milk Thistle too late. According to the Homeopathic Vet books, it is advisible to put dogs over 5 or 6 years old, on Milk Thistle for one month out of the year to clean out the poisons that are in the commercial dog foods. I believe this is true of humans as well. I think the longer you live, the more toxins your liver absorbs, and once our bodies are full of toxins, cancer and a million other terrible things follow. I, personally, take Milk Thistle in capsule form, for at least a week or so out of every month. I haven't found seed for Milk Thistle, so currently, unless I buy the commercial capsules or find it in the wild, I don't have it. Milk Thistle is also being used as a treatment for Amanita Mushroom poisoning, which kills you by destroying your liver. According to the information, the treatment only works if you give if shortly after the poisonous mushrooms have been ingested. I can't say for sure, but I would imagine that this herb would be helpful in most poisoning situations where the liver was involved. I am still searching for the seed, so I really can't advise you on growing this herb. If and when I find more info, I will update this posting.

Last edited by Graywolf; 05-13-2007 at 10:20 PM.. Reason: Updated Milk Thistle
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Old 04-06-2007, 06:26 PM
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Excellent start for this topic. Would you mind if others posted to this topic in your thread, or would you perfer for them to start another?
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Old 04-06-2007, 07:33 PM
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Excellent start for this topic. Would you mind if others posted to this topic in your thread, or would you perfer for them to start another?
It's fine if they want to add to this thread.
I was planning to edit the first installment, so I can group them all together in one post, and that way, all of my stuff will be in one place! Really glad you liked it. A very special lady got me hooked on herbs about 20 years ago, when I was 30ish and she was 60 something. Her name was Margarette, and she had been diagnosed with cancer about 12 years before I met her. They gave her a year. LOL When I met her, she had already had a partial mastectomy on each side, and then radicals on both sides. She told me that no one in this world was going to paddle your boat for you, so you better learn to take care of yourself. She had gotten off almost all meat, except fish occassionally, but nothing fried, any fruit or veggie that was acidic, drank a full gallon of water every day and totally cut out any sugar and all processed white flour, ate mostly stone ground wheat bread, dark green and orange veggies, and did what they called a microbiotic diet ... which I am sure she modified a bit. She said she was lucky to have had the cancer where it was as lumps, because when she would eat something like sugar, the pain would really increase. I think most of her doctors died before she did! She was also the person who told me that up to that time in the 1980's the largest consumer of phamaldahyde in the country was the lunch meat companies.(you know, the stuff they embalm with) Scary, huh? Anyway, the credit for me starting to learn about this stuff is thanks to a very great lady, whom I miss a lot, and telling you about her is my way of giving her honor. It's a Native thing! Besides, I love to learn more about herbs. Sometimes people come up with things that the books don't tell you about. I don't want to make this too long, but I will tell you another interesting thing Margarette told me. She use to take a walk every day around the block, and just as she would leave her back yard, she would walk past this big Weeping Willow tree. She would always grab one of the slender limbs and chew on it while she walked. This went on for about six months, and one day when she was mending socks, her husband came in and looking at her, asked, "Margarette, where are your glasses?". Now she hadn't been able to read or do close work without her glasses for years, but she said she could see fine. Ironically, that old book "Culpepper's Herbal" mentioned that Weeping Willow trees helped eyesite. A young friend of mine, who works in a plant nursery said Weeping Willow has something in it that causes it to regenerate rapidly, which is why a cut piece will grow roots into the ground. It is the same thing they use in "Root-tone" to get cuttings to grow. Now I have no scientific evidence to support this, but I believe that Weeping Willow caused something in her eyes to regenerate. Who knows, maybe it was named that because it worked on eye problems, instead of what people say today, that the tree will bring sorrow. At any rate, that is one tree I am planning to plant this spring, but you can't plant them anywhere near sewer lines or water lines, because they seek moist soil and will grow through pipes.
Anyway, thanks for asking if it was okay, and I say, "Have at it!" --Graywolf
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Old 04-15-2007, 03:03 PM
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Default New Herbs added

New Herbs added to original post!
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Old 04-26-2007, 09:48 PM
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Default Two New Herbs Added

Just added Dandelion and Milk Thistle to the herb posting!
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Old 05-13-2007, 10:22 PM
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Default Mushroom Poisoning

Just updated the Milk Thistle info to include mushroom poisoning, and this herbs usefulness as an antidote.
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Old 05-14-2007, 03:53 AM
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Wow! Great info, Greywolf, thanks!
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Old 05-14-2007, 06:55 AM
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good info, thanks
always knew dandelion could be eaten, just didn't know it was good for you, being loaded with all the good stuff.
thanks again.
BTW....can you post color photos along with the descriptions, i am printing some of the questions/replies now that i have a printer
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Old 08-16-2008, 02:30 PM
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I would like to say thank you for your information. I am new to this site and am trying to catch up on all the articles that are in this forum
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Old 08-16-2008, 11:06 PM
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I would like to say thank you for your information. I am new to this site and am trying to catch up on all the articles that are in this forum
I am doing the same thing. Glad I found this thread, thanks Graywolf
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Old 08-20-2008, 07:09 PM
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It's not an herb per se, but it is very useful for bee stings: take a leaf of plaintain [yep, that weed in the yard], mash it up, and spread over the sting after you get the stinger out.
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Old 08-20-2008, 11:38 PM
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I just learned and still learning about this annual Herb from a book I bought titled "The Secret Garden" by Miles & Bette Stair. I also researched it on the internet and still need to research who sells the seeds. It was listed in the book because Most people wouldn't recognize this plant as being edible. When in fact, both the leaf (vegetable) and the seeds (grain) can be eaten and have medicinal uses too.

The two species of amaranth commonly grown in the U.S. are Amaranthus cruentus and Amaranthus hypochondriacus. When mature, this plant is 5' to 7' tall. It can be taken internally for diarrhoea, bleeding from the bowels, and excessive menstruation. In additon, a daily dose of 2 cups of herb tea can improve health and immunity (to control allergies, diabetes, pain, arthritis and to improve memory). The tea can also be gargled for sore mouth/throat and used as a skin wash for rashes.

Use 1 tablespoon of fresh chopped leaves and infuse with 1 cup boiling water, steep 3-5 minutes.

The seeds are a strong antioxidant, reducing or removing harmful effects of pollution in the body caused by toxic substances from the environment.

Once established, it is drought resistant and is a very easy plant to grow.

Amaranth can be cooked as a cereal, ground into flour, grains popped like popcorn or flaked like oatmeal, sprouted, or toasted. The seeds can be cooked with other whole grains, added to stir-fry or to soups and stews as a nutrient dense thickening agent.
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Old 08-21-2008, 08:01 AM
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Aloe Vera for burns and sunburns
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Old 09-02-2008, 01:05 AM
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Prunella
Also known by the common nick name "Self Heal"




This plant grows roughly 1-3" off the ground and are found in moist areas, especially grassy locations. (it grows all over up here in Vermont)

It can be used to treat a wide range of common ailments especially injuries and infections of the mouth, and can work well as a remedy for food poisoning

It is reported to have an antiseptic and antibacterial effect, and to be particularly good in cases of food poisoning. (as well as treat high blood pressure)

In it's raw form the sap can be applied to cuts and other superficial wounds to speed their healing process.

Once dried it can be made into a tea to help treat food poisoning, and can be used as a mouth rinse/gargle to speed the healing of canker/cold sores, recently removed teeth and other mouth related illnesses/injuries. (including Thrush afaik)
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Old 09-02-2008, 01:13 AM
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Default Greater plantain



Although commonly considered a weed of no practical use, the large flat leaves can be used as a dressing/compress for a wound and if gathered in sufficient quantity, as temporary filler for a pillow or other piece of bedding. (Or in place of toilet tissue for personal hygiene)

It's mucilaginous sap can also be used to treat sore feet.

It contains a low level of oxalic acid and has a moderate calcium content and can also be fed to grazing animals/livestock without difficulty. Given it's heartiness and diverse rapid growing conditions/rate (they can flower and set seed just 6 weeks after germination.) it makes an ideal "crop" to raise (on a small scale) for feeding a single farm animal.

Last edited by Silveressa; 09-02-2008 at 01:15 AM.. Reason: elaboration
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Old 09-22-2008, 10:48 AM
orlfab orlfab is offline
 
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Wow...very excellent thread
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Old 09-22-2008, 11:48 AM
SpiritHorses SpiritHorses is offline
 
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GreyWolf, this is awesome information. I am new here but this was very useful information. Thank you so much.
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Old 11-09-2008, 08:51 AM
Krealix Krealix is offline
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awesome thread i learned alot
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Old 12-29-2008, 09:37 PM
Primal Spartan Primal Spartan is offline
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I hope no one minds but i'd like to take the time to add to this with just a few for starters.

Valerian- Valerian has been used for the treatment of restlessness and sleep disorders, Valerian is classified as generally recognized as safe (GRAS) in the US for food use. Extracts and the root oil are used as flavoring in foods and beverages.

Valerian is primarily used for the treatment of occasional insomnia. It appears to be more effective than other herbs for insomnia, such as skullcap, hops, and passionflower, but less effective than pharmaceutical drugs for insomnia.
(Side note I by this in bulk herb form already dried it smells very bad but works wonders, you will have very vivid dreams after drinking in tea. You sleep for about 4 or 5 hours and wake up feeling like you slept for days very well rejuvenated and wide awake.)

Echinacea- There is some evidence that echinacea (purpurea and pallida species) is effective in shortening the duration of symptoms of URIs, including the common cold, but it has not been shown to be effective as a preventative. The variation in available products makes specific recommendations difficult to determine. (Side Note Echinacea comes in different types depending on where you get i've tried several and cannot determine which is better.)

Side Effects of Echinacea-Side effects are rare. Patients with allergies, specifically allergies to daisy-type plants (Asteraceae/Compositae family) might be more susceptible to reactions. Nausea and other mild GI effects have been reported in clinical trials.



Licorice-Used historically for gastrointestinal complaints, licorice is used today as a flavoring and in shampoos.

In Chinese medicine it is used to revitalize the heart, while treating palpitations, strengthening the spleen and lungs - specially for wheezing, easing respiratory illnesses, coughing and phlegm while also protecting the stomach.

Another plus point for licorice is the useful effect it may have with minor menstrual problems and menopause, since it exerts a mild estrogenic effect.

Creams made from licorice have a calming effect on the skin and is useful in eczema.

Side Effects of Licorice

Licorice products that include glycyrrhizin may increase blood pressure and cause water retention . Large amounts of licorice taken daily for a long time can cause a range of side effects from lethargy to quadriplegia (body paralysis). Do not over-consume licorice.

SKullcap-Skullcap is not recognized as having therapeutic activity although recent studies suggest that it might have anti-inflammatory activity.

Today skullcap is commonly used in connection with anxiety, nervous tension, muscle spasms, PMS-related symptoms, tension headaches, restless legs syndrome, insomnia, and mild Tourette's syndrome.

Side Effects of Scullcap

* If taken in a normal dose, scullcap does not seem to exhibit any adverse effects.
* Avoid taking American skullcap if you are pregnant or nursing.


Mullein-Properties

It is a bitter, cooling, mucilaginous herb that promotes healing and soothes the tissues. It has diuretic, analgesic, expectorant, and antiseptic properties.

It contains triterpene saponins (including verbascosaponin), mucilage, iridoid glycosides (aucubin, catalpol) flavonoids and phenolic acids.

* Internal use
o The saponins contained in the herb help to loosen and remove mucus from the lungs, while the mucilage soothes the mucus membranes and the iridoid glycosides help to fight inflammation.
o Internally, it is used for coughs, whooping cough, bronchitis, laryngitis, tonsillitis, tracheitis, asthma, influenza, tuberculosis, urinary tract infections, nervous tension, and insomnia.
o Although it is particularly effective to loosen mucus in the lungs it also shows some success with reducing water retention.
o Historically it was also used for genito-urinary tract infections.
* External use
o Externally, mullein is used to treat earache, specifically chronic otitis media (the flowers are macerated in olive oil), sores, eczema (especially around the ear), wounds, boils, rheumatic pain, hemorrhoids and chilblains.
* Aromatherapy and essential oil use
(Side Note I've smoked mullein when i've had a chest cold it was cleared up in a night after smoking i was hacking up stuff for about 30 minutes after smoking and could breath better within an hour. Don't smoke to much you become allergic to it if used to often.)


All these herbs i've tried and some people may have different reactions to them, please use caution and research each herbal property before use and get to learn side effects.

Sorry if i doubled up on any of these, i've got many more to add if anyone is interested instead of a medicine cabinet..i've got an Herbal cabinet in my kitchen..Filled with dried bulk herb...Please feel free to ask questions if you have any.
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Old 01-09-2009, 11:59 AM
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alergyfree alergyfree is offline
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Default Cayenne

Cayenne
One of the best styptics (stops bleeding)
Used for stomach ulcers
one teaspoon in 8oz water followed by 8oz water will all but stop a heart attack
"Increases circulation and reduces stress on the heart" If a heart attack should occur, it is suggested that a teaspoon of extract be given every 15 minutes or a teaspoon of Cayenne in a glass of hot water be taken until the crisis has passed http://www.shirleys-wellness-cafe.com/cayenne.htm
I had one guy that was drinking 1 heaping teaspoon (the hot stuff as there are different levels of heat) in water for his arthritis. He bought the stuff by the lb.
Used as snuff
high in vit. c
Best of all you can eat it.
And the list goes on...
Alergyfree
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