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Old 11-14-2014, 08:30 AM
Vlasco Vlasco is offline
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Default Get Home Bag (Need Help - from work to home via foot)



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So, winter's here in Lancaster County, PA. I work roughly 2hrs from home (by foot with good weather) and am trying to get a bag put together for the off chance everyone gets snowed in and I end up with two options: 1; Stay at my work site or 2; ruck it home. Since it would be dark out during a "ruck it home" scenario, I do have appropriate visibility items (listed below), and some items are specifically for my work environment (janitorial at a warehouse.)

Some information about my path to/from work when traveling by foot:
I normally take the roadway as it's the most direct, accessible route. It is however curvy (sharp, blind corners), hilly and by a river. This is my first winter in the area, and I've been told that this road ices over very quickly (which I would expect due to the proximity of the river.) There is also one train bridge underpass (single lane, though wide enough for a vehicle to safely pass a pedestrian - I've done it before as the pedestrian, though I expect it to be hazardous if this section ices over) and one automotive bridge (sized to allow for pedestrian traffic/shoulder - this bridge passes over the river and is roughly 2 yards long, though as I have a poor sense of distance, it may be longer)

Some information about me:
I'm 30yrs old, in less than ideal physical condition (caused largely by a lack of work for the last year)

Clothing wise, I have almost everything:
  • 2 pairs extra socks
  • 1 pair vapor barrier socks
  • 1 pair polypropylene sock liners (Hey, those VB socks are uncomfortable against bare skin.)
  • 1 Balaclava (Head, neck, upper chest/back - no face coverage)
  • 1 Neoprene mask (for the face)
  • 1 Pair Snow goggles with interchangeable lenses (in case of blizzard conditions)
  • 1 pair polypropylene glove liners
  • 1 pair cotton glove liners
  • 1 pair mid-weight gloves
  • 1 pair glove shell (snow boarder's gloves)
  • Pair of rain pants
  • Windbreaker (to act as a vapor barrier for core)
  • Lightweight polypropylene top
  • 2 pairs latex gloves (vapor barrier for hands)
  • shoulder brace (bum shoulders due to bulging cervical disk)
  • high-vis vest

I'm forgetting an item or two on that list, I just can't remember what atm (hey, I've been up for a while.)

I also have:
  • one 450pc first aid kit
  • 1 stick deodorant/antiperspirant (I occasionally work 12+ hours)
  • chapstick (1 tube blistex creme stuff, 1 tube of the solid stuff that's supposed to help protect against wind - can't remember the brand)
  • 1 small jar-like thing carmax
  • 1 bic lighter (plus my zippo that's always on me since I'm a dummy and smoke)
  • 3 knives (one quick-blade box cutter from a previous job, one fold-able box cutter and a Stanley quick point knife)
  • a mini-mag light
  • a headlamp
  • 2 small notepads
  • 2 (sometimes more) pens
  • 1 Backpack with molle webbing on the back and the straps, and a D-ring on either strap (I've had this thing for over a decade. It -had- a second pack that attached to it and a kidney belt )
  • Belt (tourniquet purposes, black military dress belt)

Things I need but currently don't have:
  • Snow cleats (the type that attach to boots)
  • Some manner of tinder (thinking empty TP roll with lint in it - though I'm not sure what good this will do me if all the wood is wet.)
  • Boot covers (To keep the snow/moisture out of my boots - soft toe combat boots size 9, btw)
  • Canteen(s) with molle compatible pouch(es) (insulated, leaning towards going with two)
  • Some manner of easily portable saw to cut firewood (I have a couple variants bookmarked, though I'll need to pick one that won't be an issue with being on my job site)
  • Possibly a couple tampons in the FA kit for puncture wounds
  • Some manner of snack/food (probably crackers that'll get rotated daily)

Aside from what I have listed, does anyone have any suggestions to add or suggestions on where to get my need list from?

Please forgive anything that doesn't make much/any sense. I have been awake for nearly 24 hours and recently finished a 12 hour shift.
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Old 11-14-2014, 08:39 AM
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Possum-Pie Possum-Pie is offline
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I live about an hour from you and we had some snow showers yesterday! I'm not seeing food...power bars, peanut butter, something for energy b/c cold weather will zap your energy. I'd smear some vasaline on dryer lint and put it in a baggie. You can find dry wood even if it's raining by finding dead logs, and tearing off pieces from underneath. You have to have a pyramid of dry tinder on small twigs, bigger pieces, and put the biggest damp pieces nearby to dry after the fire is lit. It's hard but possible.
Tampons are not really good for puncture wounds. I see them recommended everywhere on this site, but trauma surgeons will tell you use a big ABD pad and gauze wrap.
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Old 11-14-2014, 08:50 AM
Vlasco Vlasco is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Possum-Pie View Post
I live about an hour from you and we had some snow showers yesterday!
We actually got some snow here as well, though it didn't stick (thankfully.) The roads available to me via car (not that I currently have one - been getting a ride from a friend or my sister) are not passable if it snows and sticks.

(Edit) Thank you for mentioning the ABD pads, btw. They're actually rather inexpensive at roughly $0.30/ea. (for the wet-pruf ones) on the first site I looked at.

Last edited by Vlasco; 11-14-2014 at 08:53 AM.. Reason: I'm almost dead on my feet and forgot something... :-/
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Old 11-14-2014, 08:54 AM
homelandsecurityham homelandsecurityham is offline
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Some visquene (tarp), maybe a SOL emergency bivvy, some para cord, tiny Esbit stove, maybe a Crisco candle with several wicks (with one wick, these last for like a month). Up north a Crisco candle might be the difference between life and death.

If you have a suv, van, or truck with a topper you might be able to bug in if you need to, if you cant stay at work till it is safe.

Fyi my favorite Crisco candle is kept, and used in a cheap new paint can from home depot (to prevent a fire if it tips or gets too close to anything (like if it is used in a car, with adequate ventilation). Wicks are cheap at the local crafts stores. They are basically a string with a washer at the end. You just pass the wick through a piece of a drinking straw, Push the washer end of the wick / straw assembly to the bottom of the tub of Crisco, withdraw the straw (leaving the wick in the tub) and tap on the side of the tub of Crisco until the Crisco fills back in around the wick. You can space the tub in the center of the paint can with a couple of rocks.

You won't run out of emergency heat with this set up, it is cheap and like I stated it can burn for like a month with a single wick. You can also space and set a clay flower pot over the paint can with the Crisco candle inside it for more radiant heat with like 4 wicks you are probably still good for a week on only one tub of Crisco.

These set ups should be in every car emergency kit up north to prevent hypothermia (just remember to leave the window or door cracked for ventilation).
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Old 11-14-2014, 08:56 AM
Pilot1030 Pilot1030 is offline
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If you are only a 2 hour walk from home you probably have too much. I agree with the food suggestion. I also carry a very small AM/FM radio with waether bands so I can get news, not to mention a little entertainment while you walk.
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Old 11-14-2014, 09:02 AM
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I would add snow shoes, some kind of 1-person pop-up shelter, emergency blanket, wet weather gear (it will replace your wind breaker and provide more protection) and if you don't have some already, get you a good pair of waterproof, extreme cold weather boots and a good pair of cold weather mittens (not gloves because keeping your fingers together holds more heat in... ask any motorcycle rider). Also, keep a couple of MRE's in your bag. You'll need the calories if your hiking in extreme weather. Also, make note of any buildings along the way now and mark them using the terrain. If you remember where they are at by terrain, you can use them as stop points along the way. Maybe even take shelter until the weather provides better conditions for travel.
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Old 11-14-2014, 09:28 AM
bltjr1951 bltjr1951 is offline
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How long for "snowed in" and how cold a wind chill?
Why would you have to travel in dark?
If its too deep for vehicles, stay at work with your food/water preps till road crews show up.
If no help arrives and you "have" to walk home, use snow shoes (good ones, not home made tennis rackets) or cross country skis.
With snow, skis would be fast travel.

Or keep a snowmobile/trailer on vehicle all during winter time.

Here's PA's winter site:
http://www.dot.state.pa.us/Internet/...e?OpenFrameset


Geez, what is up with these damn crisco candles?
Two sterno cans or 100hr candles should work and be less space/messy.
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Old 11-14-2014, 10:10 AM
arleigh arleigh is offline
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Default May I suggest a few things,,

[QUOTE=Vlasco;7094763]So, winter's here in Lancaster County, PA. I work roughly 2hrs from home (by foot with good weather) and am trying to get a bag put together for the off chance everyone gets snowed in and I end up with two options: 1; Stay at my work site or 2; ruck it home. Since it would be dark out during a "ruck it home" scenario, I do have appropriate visibility items (listed below), and some items are specifically for my work environment (janitorial at a warehouse.)

Some information about my path to/from work when traveling by foot:
I normally take the roadway as it's the most direct, accessible route. It is however curvy (sharp, blind corners), hilly and by a river. This is my first winter in the area, and I've been told that this road ices over very quickly (which I would expect due to the proximity of the river.) There is also one train bridge underpass (single lane, though wide enough for a vehicle to safely pass a pedestrian - I've done it before as the pedestrian, though I expect it to be hazardous if this section ices over) and one automotive bridge (sized to allow for pedestrian traffic/shoulder - this bridge passes over the river and is roughly 2 yards long, though as I have a poor sense of distance, it may be longer)

How hard is it to get to the river ?

Some information about me:
I'm 30yrs old, in less than ideal physical condition (caused largely by a lack of work for the last year)

Start walking with your pack, get your body accustomed to the load.
Maintain your health and rest ,add vitamin C.
I add a shot of cider vinegar once a week or so as winter arrives, cold resistant.
Clothing wise, I have almost everything:
  • 2 pairs extra socks
  • 1 pair vapor barrier socks
  • 1 pair polypropylene sock liners (Hey, those VB socks are uncomfortable against bare skin.)
  • 1 Balaclava (Head, neck, upper chest/back - no face coverage)
  • 1 Neoprene mask (for the face)
  • 1 Pair Snow goggles with interchangeable lenses (in case of blizzard conditions)
    I recommend wool gloves and ski mittens, far more effective in wet snow
  • Pair of rain pants
  • Windbreaker (to act as a vapor barrier for core)
  • Lightweight polypropylene top
  • 2 pairs latex gloves (vapor barrier for hands)
  • shoulder brace (bum shoulders due to bulging cervical disk)
  • high-vis vest

I'm forgetting an item or two on that list, I just can't remember what atm (hey, I've been up for a while.)

I also have:
  • one 450pc first aid kit
  • chapstick (1 tube blistex creme stuff, 1 tube of the solid stuff that's supposed to help protect against wind - can't remember the brand)
  • 1 small jar-like thing carmax
  • 1 bic lighter (plus my zippo that's always on me since I'm a dummy and smoke) stop smoking , it will improve your circulation and you will be warmer in the winter.
  • 3 knives (one quick-blade box cutter from a previous job, one fold-able box cutter and a Stanley quick point knife)
  • a mini-mag light
  • a headlamp
    Match your battery needs to all being the same ,radio flash lights, signaling devices. you might include a flasher like the ones those on bicycle use.
  • 2 small notepads
  • 2 (sometimes more) pens ,a pencil doesn't dry up while not in use.
  • 1 Backpack with molle webbing on the back and the straps, and a D-ring on either strap (I've had this thing for over a decade. It -had- a second pack that attached to it and a kidney belt )
  • Belt (tourniquet purposes, black military dress belt)

Things I need but currently don't have:
  • You might consider Shurpa snow shoes or cross country skis; post holing in snow long distances, with out help, can drag you down fast.
    Shurpas have ice cleats on them.
  • Some manner of tinder (thinking empty TP roll with lint in it - though I'm not sure what good this will do me if all the wood is wet.)
    the best so far is cotton balls and Vaseline . It only takes a pinch and spread it out well ,there is enough in a 35mm film can to start fires for a month.
  • Boot covers (To keep the snow/moisture out of my boots - soft toe combat boots size 9, btw)
    Gaters work great
  • Canteen(s) with molle compatible pouch(es) (insulated, leaning towards going with two)
    one should be metal so you can melt snow in it over a fire. Stainless is preferred
  • Some manner of easily portable saw to cut firewood (I have a couple variants bookmarked, though I'll need to pick one that won't be an issue with being on my job site)
    I keep a rolled up bow saw blade and pins . if there is wood to burn there is wood to make a saw handle .
  • Possibly a couple tampons in the FA kit for puncture wounds
  • Some manner of snack/food (probably crackers that'll get rotated daily)
I cary breakfast bars

I didn't see a water filter , I cary a Sawyer and pouches.
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Old 11-14-2014, 11:06 AM
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MREs are good, but I take some cheeze crackers, can sardines, bite size candy bars, etc, and put them in a mylar bag with an O2 Absorber, and seal it up. costs $1.50 per instead of like $8 for the MRE. They stay good for years, and it is easy to rotate them if they are old.
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Old 11-14-2014, 02:55 PM
Shekels Shekels is offline
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I have lived in Lancaster County my whole life. In a weather related emergency you would be better off staying at your work site. Most roads are cleared within in a day if not sooner.
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Old 11-14-2014, 05:47 PM
Vlasco Vlasco is offline
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I'll start by rephrasing my "snowed in" statement, as it's not entirely my concern.

I have two roadways that lead towards my jobsite; neither of which receive the attention they need before, during, or after a snowfall as they are backroads and evidently considered non-consequential by the county/state. As a result, I would either be stuck on my jobsite until the snow on those two roadways melted enough to allow safe vehicular travel (which, depending on temperatures following the snowfall, could possibly be a couple days), or ruck it home.

I also do not have my own vehicle, as a result, I rely on others for transportation to/from work unless I feel like walking to/from. I'm not about to ask someone to take the risk of driving me home when those two roadways ice over when it snows, and the snow accumulates. Hence the GHB, that way I have whatever I need (or as much of it as I've been able to get at that point in time) so I can safely walk home, as opposed to being stuck at work possibly for days before the roadways clear.

Now to respond to those that have posted so far, please forgive me if I miss your question/comment/suggestion.

@homelandsecurityham
I don't anticipate the effects of the snow causing me to be out for more than 5 hours at the worst, so I don't think I'll need camping gear, and with the limited space in my bag, I wouldn't be able to carry any of it, and if it were to come down to me feeling that I was too tired at the end of my shift to make the treck home, I think I would be wiser to find somewhere at work to take a nap before leaving. The paracord is a great idea though, as I can use that and maybe some D-rings or something to help pulley a fallen tree out of my way if the snow manages to knock any down and I can't practically navigate around it. (There are a couple bends with shear cliff on one side, and the river on the other, so going around won't always be possible and I'd rather not intrude on anyone's property if avoidable.)

@Pilot1030
I'll look into AM/FM radios, though I do carry my (inactive) android phone, so I'll have music. Only concern there is the battery dying, as I don't anticipate having a way to charge it (not a high enough priority, imo) so the battery operated AM/FM radio will likely find it's way into my bag, if not a battery operated MP3 player.

@America's Patriot
- Rain jacket, definitely adding that one to my list, if not simply for a hood if it's still snowing when I leave work to get home. Rain pants I already have, as I found them to be an excellent way to keep my legs warm when I was cycling to/from work at my previous job, where the roads were actually tended to for snow response.
- I'm not sure about snow-shoes though. Again, I find myself worrying about the spacial restrictions of my bag in regards to that item. I will eventually be getting a larger bag (I'm looking at this one: http://www.harrysarmysurplus.net/56-...ring-pack.html) which I hope to be able to afford in maybe 3-4 more weeks (going to try to pick up some OT, which will help me get all this gear). Though I'll probably look at the Shurpa's that Arleigh suggested and take care of both snow, and ice concerns.
- The boots are 'taken care of' by way of the VB socks. I've made use of these with the polypropylene sock liners between my feet and the VB socks with a pair of cotton socks over the VB socks in sub-zero temperatures while cycling, so they're tested and meet my approval for keeping my feet warm (they prevent my sweat from soaking my socks/boots, and as a result, keep the sweat from freezing on my feet.) though I may add winter boots anyway once I get my larger bag.
- As for mittens, personally, I detest them. I know they've been proven to keep fingers warmer than gloves, but I don't like sacrificing finger dexterity. The latex gloves should behave in the same fashion as the VB socks, though I honestly haven't tested that in sub-zero temps as I didn't think to get latex gloves for the VB until almost March of this year; they wound up only being tested in rainy weather with the temperature around the 20's (I think that was the temp range, I could be mistaken.)
- In regard to the MRE's...too bulky, and I hope to not be out long enough to need to eat that much. I'm likely to lean towards smaller stuff (crackers, maybe candy as suggested by Possum-Pie, and other small items that don't take up too much space.)
- I've managed to familiarize myself with the terrain and the buildings along the route rather well, I think. But all of the buildings are owned by someone and likely occupied, and again, I would much rather not trespass on anyone's property if avoidable. Though there is what looks like an abandoned tunnel of some kind that I don't believe to be on private property, I don't expect it to be accessible if the snow is deep and still falling - I would risk getting myself buried in snow (though that is actually a good way to insulate, I believe.)

@bltjr1951
I misspoke when I said "snowed-in", as the one road I'm most familiar with is the main concern due to road crews simply not giving it any attention (even after snow fall, which means waiting for the snow to melt before the road is remotely safe to drive on; this is admittedly, second-hand information at this point, and may well be incorrect.)
- Wind chill: I didn't pay this any mind last winter, so I'm not sure how to gauge that. Though anyone living in Lancaster/York counties should have a good idea if they paid any attention to it last winter.
- As for traveling in the dark, my shift ends between 2:30am and 4:30am, depending on how long of a shift I'm working.
- Snow shoes have been mentioned by others, and I mentioned above that I'll likely look into the Sherpa's. While faster travel would be great, the roadway bends too often and too sharply for me to think skis to be a good idea, especially as I have no skiing experience.
- Snowmobile/similar, not going to be possible as I don't have my own vehicle with which to transport said motorized snow vehicle. Would make life much easier if I could do that. Though I also have the issue of not being able to afford to make a purchase of that magnitude, so even if I had my own vehicle, I couldn't see myself getting a snowmobile.

@arleigh
- First, I'm saying this with the intention of it being constructive criticism, but as I've been up for roughly 32 hours at this point, it's going to come across far more harsh than constructive criticism should, and I apologize for that. To the point, please try to make your text stand out from the text you're responding to when you quote the whole post. I almost missed your suggestions/input as I simply scrolled down to the bottom of your post, thinking you posted your response after the quote. It wasn't until I caught a snippet that I knew I hadn't typed that I thought to skim through the entire quote looking for to see what input you had hidden amongst the quote.
- The only practical path to the river is the roadway, as any straight-cut path would take me through private properties, including a couple farms and as I said elsewhere, I would rather not trespass. I should mention that the river follows the roadway once past the first farm along the roadway, and prior to the vehicular bridge, at which point it actually veers away from the roadway, though I'm not sure how far away the river moves from the roadway and I'm not sure what the distance is between the river coming within eyesight of the road, and the bridge. I do know that during fair weather, it takes me roughly an hour to travel from my home to the automotive bridge.
-
Quote:
Start walking with your pack, get your body accustomed to the load.
Maintain your health and rest ,add vitamin C.
I add a shot of cider vinegar once a week or so as winter arrives, cold resistant.
I will definitely try to get some time in walking with my pack, as you are quite right that it's a good idea to get my body accustomed to the added weight. As for the VitC, I'll need to do a bit of research to figure out what I (as a smoker) should be introducing to my system in order for it to have the desired effect. And the cider vinegar is something I haven't heard of before, so I'll definately look into that, though I'm not sure if any stores in my area carry it. Do you think Giant/Martin's (technically the same company, as they are both owned by the same parent company) would carry it, or should I look more towards an Amish/Mennonite vendor?
- The smoking. Admittedly, definitely amongst my top 3 biggest mistakes. And the hardest to correct. The biggest issue here, for me, is my current living arrangement and my tendency to become unreasonably hostile when I start to go through nicotine withdrawal. At this point, even with the large negative impact smoking has on my physical health, it is likely wiser for me to not attempt to stop smoking. At least not until I find something that works to help ease the effects withdrawal has on my personality (I'm currently hoping to try licorice root, though that's going to be a week or two before I have the $20-ish to spend on a pack to try. I have previously tried e-cigs, and the patch - neither of which had the desired effect of helping me stop smoking.)
- As I mentioned above, I will definitely be looking into the sherpa's. I'll also be looking into the gators, and will likely get a canteen camping set (should come with a stainless steel cup, which would be perfect for melting snow in, as you suggested.)
- The saw: I believe I'm going to hunt down a hand-operated chain saw. Should be nice and compact and hopefully very easy to use.
- Personally, I haven't found any breakfast bars I care for.
- With the way the atmos (in theory, at any rate) purifies the precip, and the high probability of the river being frozen (freezing temps purify as well as heat, IIRC) I honestly can't justify a Sawyer for my current needs, though I do intend to eventually have one in my BOB.

@Possum-Pie
The $1.50 to a pack that lasts for a couple years vs the $8 to a MRE is definitely favorable. I also have a preference to keep moving when it's cold to help keep my body temp up, so the smaller items you've suggested feel more practical than a MRE to me as they will allow me to keep moving and eat, and that on top of the price point.

@Shekels
Most roads are indeed cleared within a day or two, but back roads seem to never get the attention they need. I saw that in MD as well as here in PA. This is, of course, where the concern comes in, as I have no intention of sticking around work and waiting for the snow on the back roads to melt.

I do thank all of you (Shekels' post is the last one that I currently see) for your input.
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Old 11-15-2014, 03:46 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Shekels View Post
I have lived in Lancaster County my whole life. In a weather related emergency you would be better off staying at your work site. Most roads are cleared within in a day if not sooner.
Heading out on foot into deteriorating weather is a pretty dangerous option.

If you have to do it, I'd recommend an emergency bivy or emergency blanket, spare clothing and getting the fire kit sorted out pretty solidly -- basically you should be ready to have to overnight between point A and B. A couple hours walk isn't a big distance, but in severe winter weather an injury may leave you with limited mobility and EMS or other help delayed enough hypothermia could kill you before they get there or similar scenarios.

If wet wood is potentially a major issue, you can get an emergency candle that will give you hours of some heat out put -- pair that with an emergency blanket or some contractor bags or whatever and you can survive a rough night.
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Old 11-15-2014, 09:01 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Pilot1030 View Post
If you are only a 2 hour walk from home you probably have too much. I agree with the food suggestion. I also carry a very small AM/FM radio with waether bands so I can get news, not to mention a little entertainment while you walk.
I had kind of the same reaction--and it's not necessarily a negative one, just that a 2-hour walk sounds like six miles or so. But through significant snow? Lots longer. Lots.

It's actually a pretty complete list, but IMO you're lacking one huge item: shelter. You need a tent or a tarp or SOMETHING you can use to get out of the weather.

Suppose you badly sprain an ankle to where you simply cannot proceed? You're stuck and in big trouble. You have to have something to get you out of the wind, maybe a tube tent, maybe something else.
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There actually is an official survival guide, but you have to write it yourself - and edit it as the situation changes - and revise it as you learn from your mistakes - and start all over again when things change again. (AceScanner)
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Old 11-15-2014, 09:28 AM
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sarge912 sarge912 is offline
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snowshoes or cross country skis an option?
How many actual miles? Is the road totally desolate or is there any stores or homes on the route?
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Old 11-15-2014, 12:22 PM
flashman flashman is offline
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drop the High-Vis vest
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Old 11-15-2014, 01:36 PM
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annaraven annaraven is offline
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Try Quest Bars. They're actually pretty good. I don't remember seeing handwarmers on your list (may have missed it). .
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Old 11-15-2014, 01:46 PM
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Levant Levant is offline
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Two hours could easily become two days in some scenarios. You need to plan for that.

I, on the other hand, often work 120 miles from home. I probably don't get home if I can't drive home. I was looking at my gethome ammo stash and I can never decide if I have enough, or too much.
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Old 11-15-2014, 02:04 PM
Dexx Dexx is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Vlasco View Post
Clothing wise, I have almost everything:
  • 2 pairs extra socks
  • 1 pair vapor barrier socks
  • 1 pair polypropylene sock liners (Hey, those VB socks are uncomfortable against bare skin.)
  • 1 Balaclava (Head, neck, upper chest/back - no face coverage)
  • 1 Neoprene mask (for the face)
  • 1 Pair Snow goggles with interchangeable lenses (in case of blizzard conditions)
  • 1 pair polypropylene glove liners
  • 1 pair cotton glove liners
  • 1 pair mid-weight gloves
  • 1 pair glove shell (snow boarder's gloves)
  • Pair of rain pants
  • Windbreaker (to act as a vapor barrier for core)
  • Lightweight polypropylene top
  • 2 pairs latex gloves (vapor barrier for hands)
  • shoulder brace (bum shoulders due to bulging cervical disk)
  • high-vis vest

I'm forgetting an item or two on that list, I just can't remember what atm (hey, I've been up for a while.)

I also have:
  • one 450pc first aid kit
  • 1 stick deodorant/antiperspirant (I occasionally work 12+ hours)
  • chapstick (1 tube blistex creme stuff, 1 tube of the solid stuff that's supposed to help protect against wind - can't remember the brand)
  • 1 small jar-like thing carmax
  • 1 bic lighter (plus my zippo that's always on me since I'm a dummy and smoke)
  • 3 knives (one quick-blade box cutter from a previous job, one fold-able box cutter and a Stanley quick point knife)
  • a mini-mag light
  • a headlamp
  • 2 small notepads
  • 2 (sometimes more) pens
  • 1 Backpack with molle webbing on the back and the straps, and a D-ring on either strap (I've had this thing for over a decade. It -had- a second pack that attached to it and a kidney belt )
  • Belt (tourniquet purposes, black military dress belt)

Things I need but currently don't have:
  • Snow cleats (the type that attach to boots)
  • Some manner of tinder (thinking empty TP roll with lint in it - though I'm not sure what good this will do me if all the wood is wet.)
  • Boot covers (To keep the snow/moisture out of my boots - soft toe combat boots size 9, btw)
  • Canteen(s) with molle compatible pouch(es) (insulated, leaning towards going with two)
  • Some manner of easily portable saw to cut firewood (I have a couple variants bookmarked, though I'll need to pick one that won't be an issue with being on my job site)
  • Possibly a couple tampons in the FA kit for puncture wounds
  • Some manner of snack/food (probably crackers that'll get rotated daily)

Aside from what I have listed, does anyone have any suggestions to add or suggestions on where to get my need list from?

Please forgive anything that doesn't make much/any sense. I have been awake for nearly 24 hours and recently finished a 12 hour shift.
Are the boots waterproof?

Food?
Water? You will need at least 2 liters. If there is clean snow available, you could put some in a half filled canteen and let it melt - repeat as needed.

I think you need to consider freezing rain.

You need to be thinking fast and light. The things I underlined I would question you needing.

If it is 2 hours in good weather - what is the worst case - 6 to 8 hours? You shouldn't be preparing for an overnight in the woods.
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Old 11-15-2014, 02:07 PM
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farmboy 33051 farmboy 33051 is offline
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A pair of Muck brand boots and a couple pairs of wool socks and you should be good to go for foot wear. I would go heavy on the energy/heat generating food and water. If you can keep up your energy and stay warm and dry you have a chance getting home. Go heavy on a fire kit a good flashlight with extra batteries and a whistle to signal with. Don't forget a good (fixed blade) knife. a road flare or two might come in handy. All that being said I would stay where I was if I could. PS, Does a friend or co-worker live closer to where you work than you do? Maybe a motel? Good luck.
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Old 11-15-2014, 03:03 PM
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amy5708 amy5708 is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by arleigh

I didn't see a water filter , I cary a Sawyer and pouches.
Water filters will break when exposed to below freezing temps. Better off with Aquamira or a Steri-Pen for the winter...
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