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Old 06-03-2020, 11:28 AM
Slclarry Slclarry is offline
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Originally Posted by neiowa View Post
Anything useful to be done with farm pond catfish? I've been feeding of/on with farm store catfish food. Have at least 100 in the 9-12" length.
I’ll second the fried catfish nugget recommendation. With catfish soaking it in buttermilk for 20 minutes before breading works wonders for the muddy taste.
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Old 06-03-2020, 11:51 AM
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I’ll second the fried catfish nugget recommendation. With catfish soaking it in buttermilk for 20 minutes before breading works wonders for the muddy taste.
I have heard that soaking in salt water overnight helps also, but I haven't tried it.
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Old 06-03-2020, 12:31 PM
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That works on taking the gamey taste out of animals. Soaking calamari in milk in the fridge overnite makes it cook really tender. I wonder if the buttermilk trick would work on carp too. They are both bottom dwellers.
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Old 06-03-2020, 01:05 PM
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Originally Posted by Rural Buckeye Guy View Post
That works on taking the gamey taste out of animals. Soaking calamari in milk in the fridge overnite makes it cook really tender. I wonder if the buttermilk trick would work on carp too. They are both bottom dwellers.
The only thing I have seen really work for carp is to cut the throat, then put them on a stringer and drop them in the water for a few hours. It will bleed them them out and turn the meat white.

To me it's still not worth it since I can catch a dozen sheepshead (freshwater drum) to each carp and I don't have to do anything special to them since they are already a nice white meat that is mild to bland. Takes seasonings very well though. I only keep the 3-5 pounders. Smaller isn't worth it and larger isn't as firm.
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Old 06-03-2020, 03:06 PM
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Originally Posted by dmas View Post
Any recipes for cooked frozen shrimp?..
+1 for Zeke's observation on them, but.. Do-find that 'DIY shrimp fried rice' comes out fine.. You Want 'smallish shrimps' for that, anyway (saves a boatload of 'dicing'..

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Originally Posted by IamZeke View Post
Pollack might work. Halibut would definitely.
Well, data point: Pollack - Flavor-wise, would definitely work, but.. Way-too 'delicate', falls apart really easily, so.. (tried a 'test-fillet' last nite while frying up some other fish for Din, and ya.. Not gonna 'survive the rollin') Bummer, as the flavor is a perfect-pairing..

..Anyhoo, call me crazy (well, ok, or just 'Verify'.. but thinking about yer 'spread', there (and, yeah, I hear ya on the Red onion..) I'm thinking a nice long strip of "regular" Bacon (nothing Too-seasoned, and mostly-cooked, so doesn't Need much more to be 'done', herein) layed on the fillet, Under the spread, and rolled-up / grilled, etc... Might be a winning 'wild card' (?)

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Old 06-03-2020, 03:42 PM
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Any recipes for cooked frozen shrimp? Had a sale on 31 count i think 2# bag. Was just going to heat in garlic butter, maybe a tomato cream sauce on pasta. I have never bought pre cooked shrimp but it was really cheap.
Cooked frozen shrimp I usually reserve for shrimp cocktails or salads but since they are peeled I don't see why you couldn't add them at the last minute to almost any dish.

Also lumpia or egg-rolls would be a good way to use them and tasty!
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Old 06-03-2020, 03:54 PM
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Originally Posted by dmas View Post
Any recipes for cooked frozen shrimp? Had a sale on 31 count i think 2# bag. Was just going to heat in garlic butter, maybe a tomato cream sauce on pasta. I have never bought pre cooked shrimp but it was really cheap.
We keep a package of the small ones in the freezer and we always have chopped up veggies in the refrigerator. Pop a handful of both in the last min or two of cook time for ramen. A meal in 5 minutes.
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Old 06-03-2020, 04:11 PM
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Originally Posted by Cat wrangler View Post
Aren't catfish and carp similar? Like bottom feeders?
Nope catfish like live (or freshly killed baitfish , once they get much size to them) not to say they won't eat other things because they will. But like many critters they'll feed on what they prefer whenever they can .
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Old 06-03-2020, 04:15 PM
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Originally Posted by Slclarry View Post
I’ll second the fried catfish nugget recommendation. With catfish soaking it in buttermilk for 20 minutes before breading works wonders for the muddy taste.
Take the mud vein out of the fillets and that will eliminate the "muddy taste" though I do like to soak in buttermilk to make it even whiter and the acid seems to help the texture. Also on bigger fish (> 10 lbs) the flesh near the skin is quite bloody IME, I don't fillet right at the skin on those (when we keep them that large which is rare as these are usually breeding females) The chickens don't seem to mind the bloody meat LOL

Just my opinion.
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Old 06-03-2020, 05:47 PM
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Originally Posted by Jojo View Post
We keep a package of the small ones in the freezer and we always have chopped up veggies in the refrigerator. Pop a handful of both in the last min or two of cook time for ramen. A meal in 5 minutes.
Don't have any right now, but step daughter always liked them on homemade pizza so I used to keep a couple rings on hand.
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Old 06-03-2020, 06:35 PM
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My fish tacos:

You'll need any filet that's thin enough to cook through without being flipped.

Scale and filet the fish, but DON'T skin the filets. The skin has beneficial fats, tastes good, and most importantly holds the filets together. Brush both sides with a mix of soy sauce and citrus juice of your choice, and lightly season with whatever strikes your fancy. Get the grill to 400 or hotter and lay the filets skin side down, and brush with the sauce/juice mix every few minutes until it's done.

Put the whole cooked filets, some pickled red onion, yellow rice, salsa, and a little cheese on a tortilla and enjoy.
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Old 06-04-2020, 01:56 AM
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^ Don't ferget the fresh Cilantro! And Definitely +1 on the 'skin is Good fats'..

OK, so here's one more Family-Fav, then I'll shutup.. We call this 'Vomito de Chucho' (colloquial-Spanish for 'Dog Barf'.. which is the name my Wife gave it, first time I made it / served it to her (LMAO!!) And, visually, she's not wrong, but.. Whence eaten, man, it's Quite the yummy-opposite..

- Thinnish (~3/8-1/2" thick) Tilapia fillets (skin-on, or off, yer choice, but skin On, is yummier..) Quantity, as-per serving-size of yer particular House Sharks..

- 1x 14-16 oz can Black Beans, 1x same-size (or, volume if you grow yer own..) White / Sweet Corn, 1x 12 oz package of Shredded 'Mexi-Blend cheese' (or, sure, DIY..) and 2-3 Ripe Avocados... (sorry, Jojo.. Also get together: Salt/Pepper, Butter / Olive-oil 'spread', your favorite 'Mexi-style spice' (ie: we Love McCormick's 'Mexican Seasoning', or just DIY..) small bouquet of fresh Cilantro, and 1x fresh Lime..

Prep some 'foil burritos' (See Post#12, Recipe #1 for 'instructions'..) for each fillet, Pre-heat oven to 400˚ (Ps, this can even be done in a Toaster-oven or on the Grill.. Yet 'another great reason' we Always do these 'foil burritos' when Baking fish.. Incredible-flavor, never dry, easy 'cleanup', etc..)

..Lay-out each fillet in center of its' foil-shuttle, and Butter, salt/coarse-pepper, and seasoning-sprinkle each, to-taste. Add an ample-covering of the black beans, corn and cheese. Sprinkle with a bit of cilantro, and drizzle Lime, to-taste. Fold-up / put in oven, as-per the Instructions in Post#12.

Now, normally, most fillets (under 3/4" thick) will nicely steam-cook thru in foil in ~10-12 mins, but Because this is a rather 'wet' dish (and there's nowhere for the juices to 'escape' in these foil-burritos..) you'll need to adjust the cooking-time a Bit.. Maybe ~14-15 mins if ~1/2" thick fillets, ~12-14 mins if under 1/2".. But, rarely will you Ever go more than 16 mins - this is a Really Quick way to cook fish, also..

When "done" (yes, you can sack-out the 'burritos' / unfold a bit, and carefully peak / fork each fillet / put-back if not cooked-thru yet - just be super-careful the juices don't escape the ends - been there / done that.. Carefully extricate from the foil, and transfer to serving-plate, then Top with thin-slices of Avocado / serve with fav side - Rice, whatever..

Now, if you're Really Good at moving delicate / sloppy foods, it'll 'present well', but.. If these fall apart during the 'transfer' (as these usually do, they're So moist / flakey..) well... You'll quickly understand How this dish 'earned its name'..

..Though, have to say (for those that have Kids..) when they enthusiastically ask 'What's for Dinner??!!' and your answer is "Dog Barf!".. the 'shock and awe-value' is... Priceless.

Enjoy..
jd

PS - Yes, this recipe works Great as a basis for "fish tacos", whether soft or hard-shell.. Just prep / add for serving: diced red onion / tomatoes / more fresh cilantro, and lime to squeeze.. Yummz..
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Old 06-04-2020, 02:25 AM
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Originally Posted by SoJ_51 View Post
I'm thinking a nice long strip of "regular" Bacon (nothing Too-seasoned, and mostly-cooked, so doesn't Need much more to be 'done', herein) layed on the fillet, Under the spread, and rolled-up / grilled, etc... Might be a winning 'wild card' (?)

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jd
You are asking if adding bacon to something might make it taste better?

Is this a rhetorical question? In America?




Good to see the answers starting to spread out a bit in this thread. Seemed in the beginning like the thread was going to end up mostly a suggestion to drench, dredge, and fry fillets. If that's all you know then I'm pretty sure we all knew that already. Same for baking it in the oven with lemon and butter.


Seafood lovers should look to something in southern Louisiana called courtbouillon. It's a rich seafood stew. But be careful as everywhere else in the cooking world courtbouillon is just a poaching liquid. It has to be a Louisiana recipe. There are gobs of variants online, but it is basically a seafood and tomato soup thickened with a light roux. It's a bit complicated but also very flexible. It will work for about any fish. It typically calls for some shrimp as swell, but you can get away with one of those little pouches of dried shrimp. The fish is the real meat. The shrimp is just for adding more flavor. Inlanders can keep a pouch or two in the cupboard and crank out a Cajun courtbouillon facsimile with any fish you can get your hands on.

A pouch like this would cover one pot: https://www.amazon.com/Bolners-Fiest.../dp/B01AR4ZOQ8
That link is for 4 pouches. They are find sitting in the pantry for a couple years.

Lots of stores sell those little pouches, typically in the section where you buy those little bags of dried spice. It's usually tucked into an odd little bit of vertical hanging space. You might need to ask a manager where the spice pouches are stashed. Many ethnic stores will sell those tiny dried shrimp from a jar you scoop from, especially Asian stores. Not cheap but they pack a lot of flavor and are extremely shelf stable. Definitely a candidate for LTS mylar storage.
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Old 06-04-2020, 05:36 AM
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One of my Alaskan favorites, and can be prepped ahead of time.

Great for lower fat fish that can tend to be dry after freezing, think halibut. Not exact recipe but you’ll get the idea.

Place fillet in baking dish
Add splash of wine and some butter
Salt / pepper
Liberally cover with “seasoned mayonnaise”
Sprinkle with bread crumbs
Sprinkle with Parmesan cheese

“Seasoned mayonnaise”:
Mayonnaise
Fresh dill
Thyme
Garlic
Hot sauce
Salt / Pepper
Old Bay seasoning (or similar)

Bake, then broil last couple minutes to brown cheese (careful will burn quickly)

Beginners tip: DO NOT overcook the fish. Remove form heat prior to being fully cooked. It will continue to cook from retained heat. (Just like a beef roast or steak). Take off heat when still slightly opaque in center.
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Old 06-04-2020, 07:29 AM
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or as a sushi chef would suggest, cut a thin slice of raw fish and eat it.

(Might be another couple steps to that recipe.
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Old 06-04-2020, 11:54 AM
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or as a sushi chef would suggest, cut a thin slice of raw fish and eat it.

(Might be another couple steps to that recipe.
That would be sashimi. And there is nothing else to it.
When the tuna runs, the fish market always offers free samples to customers they know will make a purchase.
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Old 06-04-2020, 12:05 PM
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Yep, sometimes LESS is more.

You won’t put ketchup on a fine Japanese Wagyu NY Strip Steak.

So don’t put heavy sauces, roux, or mayonnaise on a great piece of fish. Think of fresh Alaskan Copper River King Salmon, or even just fresh wild caught red salmon. It would be a shame to bury it with sauces.

Skin on
Salt fillet
Light sprinkle of tamari
Light sprinkle of olive oil
Course pepper

Bake.

Remove from heat while still slightly opaque in center. Do NOT overcook.
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Old 06-04-2020, 12:19 PM
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Since Sushi was mentioned I will throw this one out there.
Technically called roll in a bowl, we call it it hillbilly sushi.
No raw fish or skill needed for this one.

2 cups dry California Calrose Sushi Rice
5 Tbsp rice vinegar , divided
2 Tbsp granulated sugar
1/2 tsp salt
1/4 cup light mayonnaise
1 1/2 Tbsp sriracha
1/4 cup low-sodium soy sauce
10 oz imitation crab or lump crabmeat , torn or chopped into small bite size pieces
1 1/2 cups diced English cucumber
3/4 cup roughly chopped matchstick carrots
1 nori (seaweed) sheet crumbled into small pieces (optional - this is the only recipe I would use it in, so I don't keep it)
1 1/2 Tbsp chopped pickled sushi ginger
1 large avocado , peeled and diced
Toasted sesame seeds , for garnish

Place rice in a fine mesh strainer and rinse under cold water until water runs clear (it will take about 2 minutes of rinsing). Tap bottom of strainer with palm of your hand until water no longer falls from strainer (it should be well drained). Transfer rice to a medium saucepan along with 2 1/4 cups water. Bring mixture to a full boil then reduce heat to low, cover with lid and simmer 15 minutes. Remove from heat, keep covered and let rest 15 minutes.
Meanwhile, in a small saucepan combine 4 Tbsp of the vinegar with the sugar and salt. Heat over medium heat, cook and whisk until sugar has dissolved. Remove from heat, let cool while rice is resting then pour vinegar mixture over rice and toss to evenly coat.
In a small mixing bowl whisk together mayonnaise with sriracha. Thin with 1 1/2 tsp of water if desired. Transfer to a sandwich size resealable bag. Set aside.
In a small mixing bowl whisk together soy sauce and remaining 1 Tbsp vinegar, set aside. In a large mixing bowl gently toss together crab meat, cucumber, carrots, nori, ginger and avocado. Divide prepared rice among 4 or 5 bowls. Top with crab mixture then spoon soy sauce mixture over top of each serving. Cut a small tip from one corner of the resealable bag holding the sriracha mixture, drizzle over each serving. Serve immediately.
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Old 06-04-2020, 01:37 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by IamZeke View Post
...adding bacon to something might make it taste better? Is this ...rhetorical ..
Heh, well I certainly know what a Texan would say, but.. Was only querying feedback in Context of Yer recipe, there, since you've got the 'flavor memory' stored in Zeekrom and can, thus, answer In-context.. I think it'd likely work well, because.. Bacon.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Justme11 View Post
..cut a thin slice of raw fish and eat it..
Mmmm, 'Lox' w/ cream cheese, capers, onion-slices and fresh dill on toasty-bagel chunks..

Quote:
Originally Posted by Jojo View Post
...Technically called roll in a bowl, we call it it hillbilly sushi. ...

1 nori (seaweed) sheet crumbled into small pieces (optional ..
..or how about: 'California Roll that stepped on a Landmine'? jk.. I assume the 'option' for the nori is simply sprinkle as-garnish? I could also see roller-dicing a sheet into a size that would fit into a 'cupcake pan' (to use one as a 'liner'..) and dump yer mix onto / into them (maybe chill a bit, then use an ice cream scoop to 'form' / pack..) Sort of a 'sushi cupcake'... Ish.

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Old 06-05-2020, 12:10 AM
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Originally Posted by Texas23 View Post
Beginners tip: DO NOT overcook the fish.
This can't be repeated enough. Fish isn't like a big pork roast that gets better if you cook it to death.

No fish gets better being overcooked.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Justme11 View Post
or as a sushi chef would suggest, cut a thin slice of raw fish and eat it.
So if people wonder why sushi seems safe to eat, but you see all those warnings about raw seafood, there are some hidden facts.

First, all the fish used in sushi are salt water ocean fish. These fish are inherently less victim to parasites. Next is almost all is wild caught. The few sushi species that are farmed are farmed the way we do salmon on the West Coast, as opposed to Atlantic salmon farming. Pacific farming is more like farmed birth, wild release to grow, and then a close facsimile to wild catching. Whereas Atlantic salmon farming uses actual farm pens. So sushi fish farming is a whole lot more like wild caught, other than raising fingerling spawn to release into the ocean. Also, all sushi fish farming is done by the Japanese, who are fanatical about quality and purity.

Also, a lot of the sushi fish are cold water varieties, which is also less likely to be infested with parasites.

Next, proper sushi fish have been usually been flash frozen first. This too greatly reduces parasite risk. It has the added bonus of tenderizing the fish a bit. Sorry, your freezer at home isn't up to the task. (cue the one crazy fool who sasses me by saying they have a nitrogen pumped ice cream freezer in their garage)

And finally after all those precautions the fish gets inspected by experts at several spots along its journey from ocean to plate.

So don't be thinking you can started hacking raw slabs off that perch you just hung on your stringer at the lake.


Btw, most sushi consumed is either partially or fully cooked. Novices can have a great time enjoying sushi if they visit a better quality sushi house and make the chef understand they only want cooked and veggie offerings. Most novices that get turned off typically get dragged to a sushi place by another novice who has hit the fanatic phase and pushes their reluctant partner into food they are not comfortable with trying so soon. Either go alone or with a long term aficionado who won't rush you and takes you to a better quality establishment. You'll love everything except the bill. A serious sushi habit is like a drug habit when it comes to cost.


Jojo, the name you are looking for is called churashi, or "scattered sushi".
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sushi#Chirashizushi

Though the Hawaiians made a derivative that is now a national craze called poke.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Poke_(Hawaiian_dish)
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